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Legal

GPL and GNU GIMP in the News

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GNU
Legal
  • ADA Finance Wins “Best DeFi Project of the Year”

    The code is released under the GNU General Public License. This means that anyone can fork the code, as long as they also make their own staking code public.

  • Best photo editing app 2021: From beginners to pros | ZDNet

    The GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is a bit different from programs like Canva and Adobe, allowing for enhanced, high-quality photo manipulation. GIMP considers itself a more sophisticated photo editor that is appropriate for more experienced users, like graphic designers, photographers, and scientists. This is an open-source image editor that allows for the change and distribution of its source code. Designed to work with both digital and printed media, GIMP allows for high-fidelity color reproduction. Additionally, users can enjoy the program for image composition, retouching, and authoring. With several options available for customization, GIMP serves as a framework for special programming algorithms, working with multiple languages to include C, C++, Perl, Python, and Scheme. As a cross-platform editor, it offers wide compatibility with several third-party plug-ins and a variety of systems, including Windows, macOS, and GNU/Linux. It is also recommended for workflows with other software like Scribus, Inkscape, and SwatchBooker.

  • Which Image Editor Is Better to Choose

    GIMP is the most powerful and well-known of the free and open-source graphic editors. It is developed by enthusiasts from all over the world. It can run on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, FreeBSD, and many other operating systems. There are many different add-ons for GIMP.

    The tools of GIMP are very similar to those of the well-known Adobe Photoshop, there is support for layers, animation, a large set of filters, gradient fills, etc., set by default. It’s also worth noting the set of tools – it has everything you need even for complex graphic processing. The program allows you to open images directly from the Internet – just give a link to the picture, and then edit it as you like.

NASA advised to study up on what open source, free software, and permissive licenses actually mean

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Legal

Houston, we've had a problem: our rocket scientists don't entirely understand the nuances of software licensing.

NASA, of course, is more than just rocket scientists. It's home to software engineers and other technical types, as well as those inclined to maintenance, management, and administration, and other less storied roles.

But among those at the US space agency who deal with software – writing it, requisitioning it, glaring at it – there's less understanding of open-source software requirements than there should be.

Or so say John Haiducek, Thom Edwards, Wade Duvall, Sarah Cannon, Kai Germaschewski, and Jason Kooi – a medley of boffins from the US Naval Research Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, University of New Hampshire, and others.

Haiducek et al. recently completed a short paper titled, "Recommendations to clarify NASA open source requirements," that was released via ArXiv. Therein the researchers observe that while NASA has a policy designed to encourage open source software development, its personnel continue to be confused about the specific meaning of terms like “open source software,” “free software,” and “permissive license.”

"Some NASA documents and policies have acknowledged the OSI and FSF definitions as widely accepted, but NASA does not always use and apply these definitions consistently," the paper explains.

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Breaking down Apollo Federation's anti-FOSS corporate gaslighting

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Legal

Gather around, my friends, for there is another company which thinks we are stupid and we enjoy having our faces spat in. Apollo Federation has announced that they will switch to a non-free license. Let’s find out just how much the Elastic license really is going to “protect the community” like they want you to believe.

Let’s start by asking ourselves, objectively, what practical changes can we expect from a switch from the MIT license to the Elastic License? Both licenses are pretty short, so I recommend quickly reading them yourself before we move on.

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Join the fight against software patents with the revamped campaign site

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GNU
Legal

There are many problems caused by the enforcement of patents in the software industry, but it is important to first understand how user and developer freedoms are affected. If you don't know what End Software Patents (ESP) is about, please read the recent article we posted on the issue of software patents. To support the continued fight against software patents, we are happy to announce that the ESP campaign pages have been completely revamped! In this brief post, we will go over the main changes that you should know about.

ESP has been active for many years, campaigning and influencing public policies around the world. The campaign has been extremely influential, and has become known as one of the most popular global campaigns against software patents, especially after publishing Patent Absurdity, a documentary that demonstrated the severity of the issue. So far, it has been able to influence important court rulings and policy decisions on software patents in a positive direction. However, a major challenge that ESP had to face was to attract people who were not familiar with the legal aspects of software. The main target audience consisted mainly of developers, lawyers, and people related to the software industry. But this wasn't optimal, because software patents ultimately affect every single software user.

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Digital Restrictions (DRM) and New DMCA Exemption Requests Granted

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Security
Legal
  • You shouldn’t buy a TPM for Windows 11. Here’s why

    By now, nearly everyone knows you need a Trusted Platform Module 2.0 for Windows 11. But many people still aren’t sure if you have to go out and buy a module to fulfill that requirement.

  • The new DRM-breaking exemptions just dropped [sic]

    That means that, every three years, these same volunteers and staffers will have to use their precious time to fight for this commonsense exemption. More importantly, it means they won't be able to use that time to produce cogent, evidence-based cases for more exemptions to benefit people with disabilities, including print-disabled people who aren't blind. Ebook DRM isn't just a problem for visual impairments – people with dyslexia, people who are paralyzed or missing limbs or have coordination and muscular impairments can call struggle with the arbitrary limitations of DRM.

    The triennial exemption hearings are frustrating for all concerned. Many Library of Congress/Copyright Office staffers (even lawyers!) have privately expressed their outrage over the statutory limitations of the triennials to me. Congress should fix this idiotic, symbolic kabuki and replace it with a better system.

    They could start by issuing a blanket exemption for all circumvention that doesn't result in a copyright infringement, and for all the tools needed to effect those circumventions. If you buy a gadget, you should be able to decide how it works, and you should be able to ask other people to help you make it do what you want. You bought it, it's yours. Period.

  • US Copyright Office Expands Jailbreaking Exemption to Roku and Apple TV

    The US Copyright Office has published a list of new exemptions to the DMCA's anti-circumvention rules. Several new freedoms were granted this round, including broader right to repair permissions. The right to jailbreak also expanded to include streaming TV devices such as Roku and Apple TV boxes, despite Hollywood fears that this will boost piracy.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy's DMCA Exemption Requests Granted for Alternate Router Firmware, Copyleft Compliance Investigation and More

    Software Freedom Conservancy is proud to announce that its efforts to stand up for the rights of FOSS developers have been successful and that it has been granted almost all of the exemptions that it requested in the Librarian of Congress' recent rule making, according to the final rule Exemption to Prohibition on Circumvention of Copyright Protection Systems for Access Control Technologies, which was published today. Effective today, the Librarian of Congress ("LoC") granted DMCA exemptions for installing alternate firmwares on routers and for investigating copyleft compliance, and the exemption that Software Freedom Conservancy previously applied for and received on Smart TVs was also expanded. While our formal request to extend the security research exemption to include privacy research was not granted, the Register clarified that privacy research is indeed included in security research. Our executive director, Karen Sandler, also participated as an individual in a request to expand the existing exemption for medical devices which was also successful.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy's DMCA Exemption Requests Granted

    Software Freedom Conservancy has had several exemptions granted that it requested to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) by the US Library of Congress for activities of interest to free-software developers...

Trump's Social Media Platform and the Affero General Public License (of Mastodon)

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GNU
Legal

Trump's Group has 30 days to remedy the violation, or their rights in the software are permanently terminated

In 2002, we used phrases like “Web 2.0” and “AJAX” to describe the revolution that was happening in web technology for average consumers. This was just before names like Twitter and Facebook became famous worldwide. Web 2.0 was the groundwork infrastructure of the “social media” to come.

As software policy folks, my colleagues and I knew that these technologies were catalysts for change. Software applications, traditionally purchased on media and installed explicitly, were now implicitly installed through web browsers — delivered automatically, or even sometimes run on the user's behalf on someone else's computer. As copyleft activists specifically, we knew that copyleft licensing would have to adjust, too.

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Vizio Sued for GPL Violations

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GNU
Legal
  • Complaint (direct link)
  • Software Freedom Conservancy files lawsuit against California TV manufacturer Vizio Inc. for GPL violations

    Software Freedom Conservancy announced today it has filed a lawsuit against Vizio Inc. for what it calls repeated failures to fulfill even the basic requirements of the General Public License (GPL).

    The lawsuit alleges that Vizio’s TV products, built on its SmartCast system, contain software that Vizio unfairly appropriated from a community of developers who intended consumers to have very specific rights to modify, improve, share, and reinstall modified versions of the software.

  • SFC files suit against Vizio over GPL violations [LWN.net]

    Software Freedom Conservancy has announced that it filed suit against TV maker Vizio over "repeated failures to fulfill even the basic requirements of the General Public License (GPL)". The organization raised the problems with Vizio in August 2018, but the company stopped responding in January 2020, according to the announcement.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy sues Vizio for GPL violations

    The SFC is suing Vizio because its SmartCast OS is based on Linux. Linux's source code is protected under the GPL version 2 (GPLv2). Besides the Linux kernel, the other GPL'd and Lesser GPL (LGPL)'d code in SmartCast includes U-Boot, bash, gawk, tar, Glibc, and FFmpeg. In short, Vizio is using the code without permission.

    This can't come as any surprise. Vizio has been made well aware of this problem. The company was first informed that it had violated the GPLv2 for not releasing SmartCast OS's source code by the SFC in August 2018. After over a year of diplomatic attempts to work with the company, the Conservancy declared that not only was the company still refusing to comply, but it had stopped responding to inquiries altogether as of January 2020.

Software Licence/Licensing in Russia and in EU (EUPL)

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Legal
  • The Ministry of Finance of the Russian Federation has developed an open license - itsfoss.net

    In the git repository of the software complex “Data showcases of the NSUD”, developed by order of the Ministry of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation, the text of the license entitled “State open license, version 1.1” was found. According to the explanatory text, the rights to the text of the license belong to the Ministry of Finance. The license is dated June 25, 2021.

    In fact, the license is permissive and close to the MIT license , but it was created with an eye on Russian legislation and is much more verbose. The terms of the license contain many clarifications, already following from the legislation of the Russian Federation. At the same time, the license contains controversial points in terms of definitions. Thus, the source code is defined as “a computer program in the form of text in a programming language that can be read by a person”, which does not necessarily imply the possibility of obtaining executable code from it, and also that this code is not generated from the real source code (that is, code in the preferred form for making changes).

  • Article from Krzysztof Żok, Faculty of Law - University of Poznań

    Krzysztof Żok, Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law and Administration of the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland), publishes in the Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology (volume 15, winter 2021) a well-documented article on the EUPL and in particular on the reference to “a work or software” as the factor determining the scope of the licence.

    Here are the summary notes that the author provides in conclusion: [...]

FSFE and EEF on Free Software Licensing

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Legal

WordPress (GPL) GPLKey and GPLPlus

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Software
Legal
  • GPLKey Offers Reliable And Affordable WordPress Themes For Businesses - Digital Journal

    Important keys for a business to be successful online is to have a professional and attractive, easy to navigate, and affordable website. The themes and plugins a business chooses are important as they directly impact its presence online.

    With thousands of satisfied customers, GPLKey is an online source for premium themes and plugins for WordPress websites that fit the needs of businesses looking to create a presence on the Internet. Each of the hundreds of products featured on the GPLKey.com website have a full list of features, customization tools and the included plug-ins.

  • GPLPlus Meets the WordPress Demand for Businesses Growth

    Companies around the world are increasingly realizing that they need not break the bank for a successful website. This realization has led many organizations into utilizing open-source solutions, with one of those being WordPress as a development model. All features demanded by customers are found on this software which uses an open-source license called GNU General Public License (GPL).

    The software industry continues to succeed in solving real world problems to individual users and customer-oriented cooperations. All the demanded features have been found to be open-source, which involves the utilization of WordPress as a development model. GPLPlus understands the fact that every web developer deserves the right website, even without breaking the bank. The company has offers WordPress users the ability to excel in their next project through perfect plugin and themes.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: RenderDoc, Mesa, and Vulkan

  • RenderDoc 1.17 Released For This Leading Open-Source Graphics Debugging Tool - Phoronix

    RenderDoc 1.17 released this week as the newest version of this leading cross-platform, cross-API graphics debugging utility. RendertDoc 1.17 continues to be a gem for developers working with Vulkan and OpenGL along with Direct3D 11/12. RenderDoc as the MIT-licensed frame-capture-based graphics debugger works extremely well for game/engine developers as well as GPU driver developers in working through different issues.

  • DMA-BUF Feedback Support For Wayland Lands In Mesa 22.0's EGL Code - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa on Black Friday was DMA-BUF Feedback support within the EGL code as another important step forward for Wayland. Introduced earlier this week was Wayland Protocols 1.24 and the primary addition to that collection of protocols is DMA-BUF feedback support. The DMA-BUF "feedback" support is important for Wayland multi-GPU systems where needing to know more information about the GPU device used by the compositor and for being able to efficiently exchange buffers between the secondary and primary GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Finally Adds VK_KHR_synchronization2 Support - Phoronix

    The Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has added support for the prominent VK_KHR_synchronization2 extension introduced earlier this year. Added back in February with Vulkan 1.2.170 was VK_KHR_synchronization2 for simplifying the core synchronization APIs of this industry-standard graphics API. VK_KHR_synchronization2 makes Vulkan synchronization handling easier to deal with Those interested in the changes with the "synchronization2" revision can see this Khronos blog post going over the Vulkan synchronization handling in detail along with the changes from this extension.

Kernel: Futex2, Fixes, and Other New Features for Linux 5.16

  • Futex2 Brings Linux Gaming To The Next Level - Invidious

    Futex2 has been a work in progress by Valve and collabora for a very long time and it seems like it's finally going to make it's way into the kernel.

  • Patch out for Alder Lake Linux bug that reminds of the Windows 11 Ryzen CPPC issue - Neowin

    Linux boss Linus Torvalds merged earlier today several important patches for Intel CPU generally related to performance states (P-states) on Linux.

  • Linux 5.16 Merges Fix For One Of The Intel Alder Lake Issues - Phoronix

    Merged this Friday afternoon into the Linux 5.16 development kernel is fixing a performance issue affecting some Intel Alder Lake motherboards. The fix merged a short time ago is the item previously covered within Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems. As explained in that prior article, TurboBoost Max 3.0 / ITMT (Turbo Boost Max Technology) code within the kernel isn't being enabled for some systems, particularly if overclocking or even any memory XMP / optimal settings. The ASUS Z690 board I've been primarily using for the i9-12900K was affected as are numerous other boards. I've also heard reports of some motherboards running purely stock are even having this issue.

  • Intel Preparing USI Stylus Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel open-source driver engineers have been working on USI stylus support for the Linux kernel. The Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) aims to offer interoperability of active styluses across touchscreen devices. The Universal Stylus Initiative has a goal of allowing all styluses that comply with USI to work across devices. USI is backed by the likes of Google who wants to see USI working uniformally across Chromebooks, Dell and other hardware vendors, Intel is also involved and leading the upstream Linux support patches, and peripheral vendors like Logitech are also supporting the standard. Other big names like Wacom, Samsung, and many other players from desktop to laptops to mobile.

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more