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KDE

KTorrent: An Incredibly Useful BitTorrent Application by KDE

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KDE

There are a variety of BitTorrent applications available for Linux. But finding a good application that offers many features should save you some time.

KTorrent by KDE is one such BitTorrent app built for Linux.

While there are several torrent clients for Linux, I recently found KTorrent interesting for my use-case.

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KDE: Akademy, KNewStuff, and digiKam

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KDE
  • On conflating Reviews and Comments

    One of the other issues I see with the store and stores in general is that putting content on there means there’s yet another place where an author needs to manage comments. And that can be quite a deal breaker.

    I spend some time on getting OPDS 1 implemented into KNewStuff, because it’s a really simple way of representing available content, and I am thinking that for comments I am going to let people link in an rss/atom feed with comments. All the major content management systems have the ability to generate feeds for the comments of a single article, so authors can just link the comment feed for a blogpost, and then on our end we should direct the user to go to the blog if they want to comment.

    I think it would be pretty valuable if people could disable comments and instead point at the feed where they keep their comments. There’s some side effects there we need to keep track of, like making sure it’s clear these comments are on that blog and not on the store, as well as some vetting of the comment feed in general, but at the least it’d be in a place where the author can actually control.

    This kinda ends up making commenting on the store somewhat pointless at first glance. We could try to see if some of the distributed/federated stuff is useful for assisting people to comment on the author’s comment-feed, but that’s also something that needs investigation.

    Conclusion

    I’ve been thinking about this all a lot of the past few years. On Saturday there was an Akademy talk by leinir about distributed app stores, and there’s going to be a birds-of-a-feather about that on Friday morning. I might not be available then, so I just wanted to get my thoughts about reviews and comments out there.

    In general, I think my adjustments tend to come from a place where I have experience sitting in the author chair, as well as consuming a whole lot of indie stuff, and when looking at those, the approach of the big stores seems really weird.

  • digiKam: GSoC 2021 Week 2 | Anjani's blog

    Another week has just passed and I have new things to share. This week was more maintenance work and getting ready before we try to build digiKam with Qt6.

    In the last week, I ported a lot of code to Qt 5.15, however we need to maintain compatibility with at least Qt 5.12 LTS. I wrote several pre-processor checks and macros to maintain the required compatibilty.

  • My Akademy 2021 | [bobulate]

    The Akademy conference weekend (schedule) is almost over already. I was unavoidably detained for saturday and haven’t been able to reserve much time for it this weekend or the rest of the week. On sunday morning I hopped off my bicycle 15 minutes before the start of the KDE e.V. board report, so I’ll let you know that I was wearing bike shorts while looking .. um .. boardly up top. Thanks Tomaz for noticing my long flowing blonde hair. Beside the KDE e.V. AGM and KDE e.V. board office hour I only have one thing going on, my only thing that isn’t administrative in nature: Qt6 on the BSDs; giving it some love and bringing the packaging up-to-date on FreeBSD (catching up with OpenBSD). That’s thursday at 1600 UTC (1800 CEST, so I’m skipping dinner for it). Join us for some ports hacking.

KDE: Akademy, Kalendar (GSoC 2021)

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KDE
  • Akademy 2021 – II

    I was able to see a few more presentations than anticipated. The most inspiring was the one given by Patricia Aas I Can’t Work Like This. Based on a fictive story (with a lot of real background) she explained the Cynefin framework No, this is not a new UI or Qt based framework. The idea of the Cynefin framework is that it offers decision-makers a “sense of place” from which to view their perceptions. Unfortunately, I missed Nicolas Fella’s What’s cooking for KDE Frameworks 6. Coincidentally, I was preparing dinner at the time. This also cost me the first minutes of Dan Vratil’s C++ Coroutines and Qt. I compensated that by watching Dave Edmundson’s talk about Wayland for Qt application developers. Until yesterday, I thought Qt will abstract everything away from the application and we don’t have to do anything within KMyMoney, but now I know better. Thanks Dave. Guess I have to start playing with Wayland then in the near future just to avoid surprises in the future.

  • KDE Akademy 2021 Video Streams As Developers Discuss Wayland, Frameworks 6, Qt

    The virtual KDE Akademy 2021 conference kicked off on Friday and runs through the 25th. This annual summertime event of the KDE desktop community is attended by hundreds but again carried out online due to the pandemic.

    For those wishing to enjoy the recordings from this KDE developer conference, there is a YouTube playlist for all Akademy 2021 content.

  • Week 2 on Kalendar (GSoC 2021)

    This week’s MR involved a big refactor of the linkage between the front-end of the reminder and attendee addition UI and the back-end stuff going on.

    All this stuff now happens with models, and changes in each of the fields gets added to the models. This means that anything that you see in the UI should directly reflect whatever is present in the actual event — you won’t see a reminder and attendee that isn’t actually in the event. The benefits of having a single source of truth!

    The UI for each attendee’s details has also changed, and it now allows you to select the attendee’s status (i.e. have they RSVPed?) and it also lets you request an RSVP from the attendee.

This week in KDE: Expandable tooltips and more

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KDE

This week we have yet another interesting new user interface feature to talk about. The old “What’s This?” feature has been re-worked as a shiny and new user interface convention we’ve come up with: expandable tooltips! Many tooltips in KDE apps that use the KXMLGui and Kirigami frameworks now have a little label saying “Press Shift for more”, and if you do so, it will show you the longer text. This makes the feature much more useful since it’s invokable right at the point where you would need it. Big thanks to Felix Ernst for this work! It will land in Frameworks 5.84.

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GCompris and KDE Neon

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KDE
  • GSoC’21 Week 1: The Beginning

    GCompris is a high quality educational software suite, including a large number of activities for children aged 2 to 10, some of the activities are game orientated, but nonetheless still educational.

    Currently GCompris offers more than 100 activities, and more are being developed. GCompris is free software, it means that you can adapt it to your own needs, improve it, and most importantly share it with children everywhere.

    The GCompris project is hosted and developed by the KDE community.

  • KDE neon now on Linux 5.8

    Here at KDE neon we pride ourselves on giving you the latest from KDE built pronto and QAed and shipped to you with no questions asked. We also base on the stable Ubuntu LTS 20.04 release giving a generally stable system. If you want an updated version of an app which isn’t from KDE we advise you to use a non-distro package from the Snap store, AppImage or Flatpak. But Linux has one property which is still inconvenient for the end user even the more nerdy of end users, which is that drivers are shipped with the Linux version you get and there’s no stable programmer interface for them so they can’t easily be shipped externally. That means if you use Linux 5.4 which is what comes with KDE neon and Ubuntu 20.04 you will get drivers which are a few years old, which is no good for those shiny new AMD Radeon graphics chips. So we’ve now switched the installable images to the HWE build which brings in Linux 5.8. Neon installs should just install it on upgrade and use it on the next boot. Chat on our forum and report bugs on bugs.kde.org as ever.

KDE: Akademy, Bug Triaging, Packaging Work by Norbert Preining, and Krita on Simplifying Grammar Checks for Manual

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KDE

  • Akademy 2021 at Home

    Once again I plan to be at Akademy. I almost silently attended last year edition. OK… I had a talk there but didn’t blog. I even didn’t post my traditional sketchnotes post. I plan to do better this year.

    I’ll try to sketchnote again, we’ll see how that works out. Oddly enough, I might do the 2020 post after the 2021 one.

  • KDE's Nate Graham: Bug triaging is the foundation of quality and we need more of it

    Bug triaging is a largely invisible and often thankless task. But it’s the foundation of quality in our software offerings. Every day, our users file between 30 and 50 bug reports on https://bugs.kde.org, and often up to 100 right after a big release! Many will be duplicates of pre-existing issues and need to be marked as such. Quite a few will be caused by issues outside of KDE’s control and this also needs to be marked as such. Many will be crash reports with missing or useless backtraces, and their reporters need to be asked to add the missing information to make the bug report actionable. And the rest need to be prioritized, moved to the right component, tagged appropriately, and eventually fixed.

  • Debian's Cinnamon desktop maintainer quits because he thinks KDE is better now

    Norbert Preining, the maintainer of the Cinnamon desktop packages for Debian is quitting as he no longer uses it - though others have volunteered to take his place.

    The origins of the Cinnamon desktop go back to 2011 and the release of the controversial GNOME 3 desktop, which introduced radical changes. Some Linux users preferred the desktop metaphor offered by GNOME 2.x, including the Linux Mint team. The MATE desktop was a fork of GNOME 2, while the Linux Mint folk made Cinnamon, a fork of GNOME 3 designed to retain the design of GNOME 2, using the Mint Gnome Shell Extensions (MGSE). Cinnamon later became a full fork of GNOME 3.

    Cinnamon remains the default desktop for Linux Mint (which also offers MATE and Xfce editions), but is also available for other distributions including Debian. Mint itself is based on Ubuntu, though there is also a Linux Mint Debian edition (LMDE).

  • Simplifying Grammar Checks for Manuals.

    Like most online manuals, the Krita manual has a contributor’s guide. It’s filled with things like “who is our assumed audience?”, “what is the dialect of English we should use?”, etc. It’s not a perfect guide, outdated in places, definitely, but I think it does it’s job.

    So, sometimes I, who officially maintains the Krita manual, look at other project’s contributor’s guides. And usually what I find there is…

KDE Plasma 5.22.1, Bugfix Release for June

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KDE
Security

Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.22.1.

Plasma 5.22 was released in June 2021 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

This release adds a week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important and include...

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First KDE Plasma 5.22 Point Release Improves the Wayland Session for NVIDIA/AMD Systems

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.22.1 is here just one week after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.22 desktop environment series, and it includes improvements for the Plasma Wayland session to detect additional screens on NVIDIA/AMD multi-GPU setups, as well as to blur the transparent background behind task switchers.

This first point release to KDE Plasma 5.22 also improves the new Plasma System Monitor app to open the “Get New Pages” view in an overlay instead of a narrow column, and makes the Network Speed widget, Weather widget’s BBC weather data source, and custom shortcuts for “Walk through applications” work correctly.

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Kdenlive 21.04.2 released

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KDE

The second maintenance release of the 21.04 series is out bringing missing keyframing support to effects (like glitch0r. scratchlines and charcoal) as well as the usual batch of bug fixes and usability improvements.

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Also: digiKam: GSoC 2021 Week 1

KDE Framework 5.84 - Expandable Tooltips

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KDE
Software

Starting with the KDE Frameworks 5.84 release, KXMLGUI based applications will feature expandable tooltips per default.

The matching merge request by Felix Ernst got merged today after 3 months ;=)

What are expandable tooltips at all?

Good question ;=)

In short: for stuff like menu & toolbar actions, it provides an easy way to access the “What’s This?” help.

Unlike before, where you need to manually trigger that via the “Shift-F1” shortcut and click around to try out which GUI elements provide at all this additional help, you will now first get a small tooltip with the normal tooltip content (if any) and a hint that with “Shift” you are able to get more help displayed.

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More in Tux Machines

Tiny i.MX8M Mini module also ships on dev kit with Digi XBee

Digi’s rugged “ConnectCore 8M Mini” module runs Linux or Android on an i.MX8M Mini with Digi TrustFence security, up to 2GB LPDDR4 and 8GB eMMC, and 802.11ac/Bluetooth 5.0. A dev kit offers mini-PCIe and Digi XBee expansion. Digi has launched a Digi ConnectCore 8M Mini module and development kit that feature NXP’s i.MX8M Mini and support for Digi XBee modules including cellular add-ons. The ConnectCore 8M Mini has the same 45 x 40 x 3.5mm dimensions as the i.MX8X based Digi ConnectCore 8X module from 2018. We missed a similarly sized, i.MX8M Nano based ConnectCore 8M Nano from 2019, which has many of the features of the ConnectCore 8M Mini but is limited to 1GB RAM instead of 2GB. Read more

Most Beautiful Linux Distributions

Today there is Linux distribution for every type of computer user present on this planet irrespective of their work. From a kid studying in school to a professional working in a multinational company, there is Linux distribution available for every user. Linux is an open-source operating system; developers worldwide use various open-source technologies to develop a new surprising fork of Linux. Everyone gets tired of looking at the same desktop every day; we need something refreshing at a fixed interval of time to keep ourselves fresh and focused on work. Especially if you’re working on Windows or Mac OS, you get tired of the same look and layout because they generally possess the same look and feel even after some major updates. Read more

Best OCR Apps for Linux

This article will cover a list of useful “Optical Character Recognition” software available for Linux. An optical character recognition (OCR) software attempts to detect text content of non-text files whose content cannot be selected or copied but can be viewed or read. For instance, an OCR software can identify text from images, PDF or other scanned documents in digital file formats using various algorithms and AI based solutions. These OCR software are especially useful for converting and preserving old documents as they can be used to identify text and create digital copies. Sometimes the identified text may not be 100% accurate but OCR software removes the need for manual edits to a great extent by extracting as much text as possible. Manual edits can be made later to improve accuracy further and create one-to-one replicas. Most OCR software can extract text into separate files, though some also support superimposing a hidden text layer on original files. Superimposed text allows you to read content in original print and format but also allows you to select and copy text. This technique is specially used to digitize old documents into PDF format. Read more

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