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Slackware Linux 15.0 RC2: Current (pre-release) ChangeLog for x86_64

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Slack

Clearly we're going to have to trend more carefully for things to settle down,
so consider this RC2 and a much harder freeze. A test mass rebuild was done
here and there are no more "fails to build from source" remaining (thanks to
nobodino for some amazing and relentless testing).

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Also: Slackware 15.0 Takes Another Step Closer To Release - Phoronix

Operating Systems: Ubuntu, Slackware, NemoMobile, Sailfish OS

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OS
Slack
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 708

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 708 for the week of October 31 – November 6, 2021.

  • October ’21 updates for OpenJDK 7 and 8 | Alien Pastures

    The newly released icedtea 2.6.28 and 3.21.0 build OpenJDK 7u321_b01 and OpenJDK 8u312_b07 respectively. These releases include the October 2021 security fixes for Java 7 and 8 from Oracle.

    [...]

    My Java 7 and Java 8 packages (e.g. openjdk7 and openjdk… or openjre7 and openjre) can not co-exist on your computer because they use the same installation directory. You must install either Java 7 or Java 8.

    Remember that I release packages for the JRE (runtime environment) and the JDK (development kit) simultaneously, but you only need to install one of the two. The JRE is sufficient if you only want to run Java programs (including Java web plugins). Only in case where you’d want to develop Java programs and need a Java compiler, you are in need of the JDK package.

  • Secure Boot support landed in liveslak 1.5.0

    Secure Boot is part of the UEFI specification and first appeared in the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) 2.3.1 specification (Errata C). It is meant to prevent the execution of unauthorized code upon boot of a computer. Most modern Personal Computers will have a way of enabling Secure Boot in UEFI, but it is common to leave it disabled if you are not running a Microsoft OS on it since Microsoft controls Secure Boot.

    For dual-boot scenario’s the story is different however. Microsoft Windows 8 and 10 advise to have Secure Boot enabled but don’t enforce it, but as far as I know, for Microsoft Windows 11 enabling Secure Boot will be a requirement to get full upgrade support.

  • Nemomobile in November/2021

    NemoMobile 0.6 was released. Horay! What else? We have new boot splash, reworked device lock, new policy kit agent and old-new package manager, updates of bluetooth, pulse audio, the translations was updated. PineTab initial support.

  • [Release notes] Suomenlinna 4.3.0

    Jolla Phone is not supported anymore. OS release 3.4.0 was the last one for this device launched 7 years ago. The lowest supported kernel version of Sailfish 4 in the remaining Sailfish OS devices is 3.10. It is in Jolla C, Jolla Tablet and Xperia X.

    The instructions for installing Sailfish OS to Sony Xperia X, Xperia XA2, Xperia 10, and Xperia 10 II (mark 2) devices are here - covering Windows, Linux, and macOS computers.

liveslak-1.4.0 and new ISO images are available

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Slack

It’s that time again for a fresh batch of ISOs for Slackware Live Edition.
The ISO files are based on Slackware-current of “Sat Oct 23 18:57:30 UTC 2021” and using the liveslak-1.4.0 scripts.

The Slackware-current snapshot on which the Live ISOs are based contains a Linux 5.14.14 kernel.
This is not yet the pre-emptive variant of 5.14.14 which you can find in “./testing” inside today’s Slackware-current mirrors. However, you can use liveslak’s “upslak.sh” script to easily upgrade the kernel on your persistent USB Live if you want.
It’ll be interesting to see how it improves real-time performance on the DAW Live platform.

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LibreOffice 7.2.2 for Slackware-current is available

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LibO
Slack

LibreOffice Community Edition 7.2.2 was released yesterday and I have uploaded a new set packages for Slackware-current.

The document conversion libraries have been split off and made available via the Document Liberation Project : documentliberation.org . It is the home for a growing community of developers ‘united to free users from vendor lock-in of content‘. Software like Calligra, Inkscape and Scribus also make good use of the document format conversion capabilities these libraries offer.

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liveslak-1.3.10 and new ISO images for Slackware Live Edition

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Slack

The previous batch of ISOs for Slackware Live Edition is already a few months old, so I decided to generate new images.
The ISO files are based on Slackware-current of “Wed Sep 8 18:07:38 UTC 2021” and using the liveslak-1.3.10 scripts, where passwordless login is a new feature.

Slackware-current has the label “15.0 Release Candidate 1” since August 16th but considering the amount of non-trivial updates since that date, I wonder whether the phrase “release candidate” has any relevance here. No sign that we are anywhere nearer to a final 15.0 release.

Let’s hope for the best, and in the meantime fresh ISOs for the Slackware Live Edition can be obtained at download.liveslak.org .

I refreshed he ‘bonus‘ section as well. There you find several squashfs modules you can use with your persistent liveslak USB stick. Copy these module into the ‘addons’ directory on the USB drive. They expand the functionality of the Live OS and allow me to keep the ISO file size within reasonable bounds.
Among these you’ll find the binary nvidia driver (already contained in the CINNAMON, DAW and MATE ISOs by the way); Wine 6.12, multilib, the DAW package collection, and a set from my own repository (chromium, libreoffice, veracrypt, vlc etc).

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Easy-Slackware 15.0 RC1 experiment

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Slack

A couple of intense days getting there, finally booted "Easy Slack" to a desktop, built from Slackware 15.0 RC1 binary packages. A snapshot:

After all that effort, have decided to take it no further. Various reasons...

Slackware is supposed to be "lean and mean" and I expected the final easy-*.img.gz file to be small, at least smaller than the Easy-Buster Debian-based build. But, it is 610MB, bigger.

The Slackware repository is quite small. SalixOS have some extras, but important packages are missing, such as LibreOffice and Inkscape. Perhaps they intend to add them?

To fill the gaps of missing packages, I used some from Easy Dunfell-series, those compiled by me in OpenEmbedded. But ran into library version hell. Simply creating symlinks to libraries of a different version is very iffy.

Anyway, got a desktop, wifi works. Sakura terminal works, but the "back arrow" key deposits strange characters on the screen. Perhaps because sakura is from Dunfell and vte is from Slackware repo, with a vte library version mismatch.

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Slackware 15.0 Coming Soon With RC1 Released

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Slack

Not only did Debian 11 make it out this weekend, but Slackware 15 is finally up to its release candidate phase as the next major installment of this long-running Linux distribution.

While Slackware is one of the oldest still-maintained Linux distributions out there, it doesn't often see new updates and doesn't have nearly the manpower of more modern alternatives. It's been nearly one decade since Slackware 14 but Slackware 15 is about to ship.

Back in February marked the release of Slackware 15.0 Alpha and then in April was the Slackware 15.0 Beta. Now in August is the first release candidate of Slackware 15.0 while the stable release shouldn't be too far out.

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Direct: Current (pre-release) ChangeLog for x86_64

Is Slackware the Right Linux Distribution for You? What You Need to Know

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Slack

Debian might be the oldest popular distribution but it's tied with Slackware as the oldest one still in existence. The Slackware project started in 1992, a year after Linux was initially released, as a way to install a Linux system that already included some core packages: the kernel, the X Window System, and other utilities.

Since then, the distribution honestly hasn't changed much. Its maintainers seem to have an "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality in their design decisions.

Patrick Volkerding created Slackware out of his frustrations with what was the most popular early Linux distro, Softland Linux System (SLS). SLS was widely used among the early Linux community, but it was buggy. Volkerding, a computer science student at Minnesota State University Moorhead, decided to start his own distribution.

Debian and OpenSUSE have similar roots in their founders becoming frustrated with SLS, so SLS in some way may be a common ancestor to most modern Linux distros.

Volkerding was a member of the parody religion, Church of the SubGenius, and decided to name his new distro "Slackware" in reference to the SubGenius concept of "slack," and the rest is history. The SubGenius connection furthered with the logo of Tux with SubGenius mascot J.R. "Bobb" Dobbs' iconic pipe.

Volkerding still exerts a lot of influence over the project to this day as its BDFL or Benevolent Dictator For Life. The pace of releases slowed down in the 2000s owing to Volkerding's health issues. The current LTS release as of this writing is 14.2, released in 2016.

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Slackware 15.0-beta is out now

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Slack

  • Current (pre-release) ChangeLog for x86_64
  • Slackware 15 Beta Process Begins - Phoronix

    Back in February Slackware 15.0 went into alpha, nine years since Slackware 14.0 made its debut or even five years since Slackware 14.2. Now Slackware 15.0 is up to its beta phase.

    In the two months since the alpha start, Slackware 15.0 has seen many package updates and is ready enough to be called beta. Slackware 15.0 Beta is using the GCC 10.3 compiler, a newer revision of the Linux 5.10 LTS kernel, and many other package updates like the newest KDE desktop components are available.

  • Slackware Linux 15.0 Beta, The Legend Is Back

    Is Slackware dead? The answer is no! Patrick Volkerding has announced that Slackware 15 moved to stage of beta testing.

    Slackware is a Linux distribution created by Patrick Volkerding in 1993. For many early Linux users, Slackware was their introduction. After more than a quarter century and 30-plus versions later, Slackware is the oldest actively maintained Linux distribution, but now it is not nearly as popular as it was a decade or more ago. The features of the distribution are the lack of complications and a simple system of initialization in the style of classical BSD systems.

    We haven’t had any Slackware news since the release of Slackware Linux 14.2 in July 2016. Till now.

  • Phew! The Oldest Active Linux Distro, Slackware, is Not Dead Yet

    Slackware is one of the earliest distributions before any mainstream option was popular. You will be surprised to know that this year marks its 28th year. It is mostly suitable for experienced Linux users who want the stability and ease of use.

    Slackware hasn’t seen a new release in years, the last release being in 2016. That left people guessing if the oldest maintained Linux distribution was on the verge of being discontinued.

How to ‘un-google’ your Chromium browser experience

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Google
Slack

On March 15th 2021, Google is going to block non-Google chromium-based browsers from accessing certain ?private Google Chrome web services? by unilaterally revoking agreements made with 3rd parties in the past.
Meaning, every Chromium based product not officially distributed by Google will be limited to the use of only a few public Google Chrome web services.
The most important service that remains open is ?safe browsing?. The safe browsing feature identifies unsafe websites across the Internet and notifies browser users about the potential harm such websites can cause.

The most prominent feature which will be blocked after March 15th is the ?Chrome Sync?. This Chrome Sync capability in Chromium based browsers allows you to login to Google?s Sync cloud servers and save your passwords, browsing history and bookmarks/favorites to your personal encrypted cloud vault inside Google?s infrastructure.
Extremely convenient for people who access the Internet using multiple devices (like me: Chrome on a few Windows desktops, Chromium on several Slackware desktops and laptop and Chrome Mobile on my Android smartphone) and who want a unified user experience in Chrome/chromium across all these platforms.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux, and More

Kernel: Slowdown, CephFS, and FS-Cache / CacheFiles

  • How a performance boost in Linux kernel for one family of Intel chips slowed its latest Alder Lake processors

    The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel’s 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn’t just been causing problems for some Windows gamers – it almost led to complications for Linux. Phoronix’s Michael Larabel noticed a performance hit in the kernel a fortnight ago – in a work-in-progress release candidate, we should stress – and a fix for the scheduling code landed a little later. It turned out the kernel suffered on Alder Lake chips due to a performance-enhancing tweak for another Intel processor family: the multiple-Atom-core-based Jacobsville. This year, Intel officially canned its Lakefield chips. These consisted of a performance core called Sunny Cove as well as Atom-class efficiency cores dubbed Tremont. Crucially, there are still multi-Tremont-core embedded processors out there, such as Snow Ridge. These are server and infrastructure-oriented components with up to 24 cores. The first proposed cut of kernel 5.16, specifically 5.16-rc1, contained a revision to the scheduler that makes it aware that some clusters of cores share a block of L2 cache – as seen in Snow Ridge and Jacobsville.

  • Testing the Linux Kernel CephFS Client with xfstests

    I do a lot of testing with the kernel cephfs client these days, and have had a number of people ask about how I test it. For now, I’ll gloss over the cluster setup since there are other tutorials for that.

  • Major Rewrite Of Linux's FS-Cache / CacheFiles So It's Smaller & Simpler - Phoronix

    As part of David Howells of Red Hat long-term work on improving the caching code used by network file-systems, he today posted a big patch series rewriting the fscache and cachefiles code as the latest significant step on that adventure. Howells posted a set of 64 patches for rewriting the kernel's fscache and cachefiles code. Linux's fsache is a general purpose cache used by network file-systems while cachefiles is for providing a caching back-end for mounted local file-systems. The Red Hat engineer has been working on this rewrite for more than the past year.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu Desktop on Google Clown

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 711

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 711 for the week of November 21 – 27, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud

    This tutorial shows you how to set up a Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud. If you need a graphic interface to your virtual desktop on the cloud, this tutorial will teach you how to set up a desktop environment just like what you can get on your own computer.

Open Hardware/Modding: ESP32, 3-D Printing, Raspberry Pi Pico, PocketBeagle

  • Wireless thermal printer kit features M5Stack ATOM Lite controller - CNX Software

    This is certainly not the first ESP32 thermal printer solution, as there are various implementations including bitbank2 thermal printer Arduino connecting ESP32 and nRF52 boards to the printer over Bluetotoh LE, or a Arduino sketches to print bitmaps over serial or MQTT.

  • Generate Fully Parametric, 3D-Printable Speaker Enclosures | Hackaday

    Having the right speaker enclosure can make a big difference to sound quality, so it’s no surprise that customizable ones are a common project for those who treat sound seriously. In that vein, [zx82net]’s Universal Speaker Box aims to give one everything they need to craft the perfect enclosure.

  • Z80 Video Output Via The Raspberry Pi Pico | Hackaday

    Building basic computers from the ground up is a popular pastime in the hacker community. [Kevin] is one such enthusiast, and decided to whip up a video interface for his retro Z80 machine.

  • The Calculator Charm: Calculatorium Leviosa! | Hackaday

    Have you ever tried waving your hand around like a magic wand and summoning a calculator? We would guess not since you’d probably look a little silly doing so. That is unless you had [Andrei’s] cool gesture-controlled calculator. [Andrei] thought it would be helpful to use a calculator in his research lab without having to take his gloves off and the results are pretty cool. His hardware consists of a PocketBeagle, an OLED, and an MPU6050 inertial measurement unit for capturing his hand motions using an accelerometer and gyroscope. The hardware is pretty straightforward, so the beauty of this project lies in its machine learning implementation.