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LibreOffice 7.2.2 for Slackware-current is available

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LibO
Slack

LibreOffice Community Edition 7.2.2 was released yesterday and I have uploaded a new set packages for Slackware-current.

The document conversion libraries have been split off and made available via the Document Liberation Project : documentliberation.org . It is the home for a growing community of developers ‘united to free users from vendor lock-in of content‘. Software like Calligra, Inkscape and Scribus also make good use of the document format conversion capabilities these libraries offer.

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liveslak-1.3.10 and new ISO images for Slackware Live Edition

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Slack

The previous batch of ISOs for Slackware Live Edition is already a few months old, so I decided to generate new images.
The ISO files are based on Slackware-current of “Wed Sep 8 18:07:38 UTC 2021” and using the liveslak-1.3.10 scripts, where passwordless login is a new feature.

Slackware-current has the label “15.0 Release Candidate 1” since August 16th but considering the amount of non-trivial updates since that date, I wonder whether the phrase “release candidate” has any relevance here. No sign that we are anywhere nearer to a final 15.0 release.

Let’s hope for the best, and in the meantime fresh ISOs for the Slackware Live Edition can be obtained at download.liveslak.org .

I refreshed he ‘bonus‘ section as well. There you find several squashfs modules you can use with your persistent liveslak USB stick. Copy these module into the ‘addons’ directory on the USB drive. They expand the functionality of the Live OS and allow me to keep the ISO file size within reasonable bounds.
Among these you’ll find the binary nvidia driver (already contained in the CINNAMON, DAW and MATE ISOs by the way); Wine 6.12, multilib, the DAW package collection, and a set from my own repository (chromium, libreoffice, veracrypt, vlc etc).

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Easy-Slackware 15.0 RC1 experiment

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Slack

A couple of intense days getting there, finally booted "Easy Slack" to a desktop, built from Slackware 15.0 RC1 binary packages. A snapshot:

After all that effort, have decided to take it no further. Various reasons...

Slackware is supposed to be "lean and mean" and I expected the final easy-*.img.gz file to be small, at least smaller than the Easy-Buster Debian-based build. But, it is 610MB, bigger.

The Slackware repository is quite small. SalixOS have some extras, but important packages are missing, such as LibreOffice and Inkscape. Perhaps they intend to add them?

To fill the gaps of missing packages, I used some from Easy Dunfell-series, those compiled by me in OpenEmbedded. But ran into library version hell. Simply creating symlinks to libraries of a different version is very iffy.

Anyway, got a desktop, wifi works. Sakura terminal works, but the "back arrow" key deposits strange characters on the screen. Perhaps because sakura is from Dunfell and vte is from Slackware repo, with a vte library version mismatch.

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Slackware 15.0 Coming Soon With RC1 Released

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Slack

Not only did Debian 11 make it out this weekend, but Slackware 15 is finally up to its release candidate phase as the next major installment of this long-running Linux distribution.

While Slackware is one of the oldest still-maintained Linux distributions out there, it doesn't often see new updates and doesn't have nearly the manpower of more modern alternatives. It's been nearly one decade since Slackware 14 but Slackware 15 is about to ship.

Back in February marked the release of Slackware 15.0 Alpha and then in April was the Slackware 15.0 Beta. Now in August is the first release candidate of Slackware 15.0 while the stable release shouldn't be too far out.

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Direct: Current (pre-release) ChangeLog for x86_64

Is Slackware the Right Linux Distribution for You? What You Need to Know

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Slack

Debian might be the oldest popular distribution but it's tied with Slackware as the oldest one still in existence. The Slackware project started in 1992, a year after Linux was initially released, as a way to install a Linux system that already included some core packages: the kernel, the X Window System, and other utilities.

Since then, the distribution honestly hasn't changed much. Its maintainers seem to have an "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality in their design decisions.

Patrick Volkerding created Slackware out of his frustrations with what was the most popular early Linux distro, Softland Linux System (SLS). SLS was widely used among the early Linux community, but it was buggy. Volkerding, a computer science student at Minnesota State University Moorhead, decided to start his own distribution.

Debian and OpenSUSE have similar roots in their founders becoming frustrated with SLS, so SLS in some way may be a common ancestor to most modern Linux distros.

Volkerding was a member of the parody religion, Church of the SubGenius, and decided to name his new distro "Slackware" in reference to the SubGenius concept of "slack," and the rest is history. The SubGenius connection furthered with the logo of Tux with SubGenius mascot J.R. "Bobb" Dobbs' iconic pipe.

Volkerding still exerts a lot of influence over the project to this day as its BDFL or Benevolent Dictator For Life. The pace of releases slowed down in the 2000s owing to Volkerding's health issues. The current LTS release as of this writing is 14.2, released in 2016.

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Slackware 15.0-beta is out now

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Slack

  • Current (pre-release) ChangeLog for x86_64
  • Slackware 15 Beta Process Begins - Phoronix

    Back in February Slackware 15.0 went into alpha, nine years since Slackware 14.0 made its debut or even five years since Slackware 14.2. Now Slackware 15.0 is up to its beta phase.

    In the two months since the alpha start, Slackware 15.0 has seen many package updates and is ready enough to be called beta. Slackware 15.0 Beta is using the GCC 10.3 compiler, a newer revision of the Linux 5.10 LTS kernel, and many other package updates like the newest KDE desktop components are available.

  • Slackware Linux 15.0 Beta, The Legend Is Back

    Is Slackware dead? The answer is no! Patrick Volkerding has announced that Slackware 15 moved to stage of beta testing.

    Slackware is a Linux distribution created by Patrick Volkerding in 1993. For many early Linux users, Slackware was their introduction. After more than a quarter century and 30-plus versions later, Slackware is the oldest actively maintained Linux distribution, but now it is not nearly as popular as it was a decade or more ago. The features of the distribution are the lack of complications and a simple system of initialization in the style of classical BSD systems.

    We haven’t had any Slackware news since the release of Slackware Linux 14.2 in July 2016. Till now.

  • Phew! The Oldest Active Linux Distro, Slackware, is Not Dead Yet

    Slackware is one of the earliest distributions before any mainstream option was popular. You will be surprised to know that this year marks its 28th year. It is mostly suitable for experienced Linux users who want the stability and ease of use.

    Slackware hasn’t seen a new release in years, the last release being in 2016. That left people guessing if the oldest maintained Linux distribution was on the verge of being discontinued.

How to ‘un-google’ your Chromium browser experience

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Google
Slack

On March 15th 2021, Google is going to block non-Google chromium-based browsers from accessing certain ?private Google Chrome web services? by unilaterally revoking agreements made with 3rd parties in the past.
Meaning, every Chromium based product not officially distributed by Google will be limited to the use of only a few public Google Chrome web services.
The most important service that remains open is ?safe browsing?. The safe browsing feature identifies unsafe websites across the Internet and notifies browser users about the potential harm such websites can cause.

The most prominent feature which will be blocked after March 15th is the ?Chrome Sync?. This Chrome Sync capability in Chromium based browsers allows you to login to Google?s Sync cloud servers and save your passwords, browsing history and bookmarks/favorites to your personal encrypted cloud vault inside Google?s infrastructure.
Extremely convenient for people who access the Internet using multiple devices (like me: Chrome on a few Windows desktops, Chromium on several Slackware desktops and laptop and Chrome Mobile on my Android smartphone) and who want a unified user experience in Chrome/chromium across all these platforms.

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Absolute64-20210302 released

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Slack

Based on Slackware64-current.
Slack recompiled everything due to gcc update...
Stuff that I did NOT recompile still works, go figure.
SpaceFM and ROX-Filer (arox) get me occassional complaints
due to their age/ lack of updating...
but they work for me and I still don't even use gvfs or udisks,
like a default Slackware install.
[But Slackware still resists systemd, YEAH!]

Pulled Kodi and GMT from the installer --
Kodi I never use, so timely updating becomes an issue.
GMT (generic mapping tools), no one besides me ever uses.
These ommissions trimmed the ISO filesize a bit.
Still a lot of development libraries included
so the download is not small.
But remember, although the distro has lots of files -- it runs lite Smile

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Slackware 15.0 alpha1

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Slack

Hold the press! There’s good news on Slackware development front.
Slackware 14.2, the last stable release, saw the light on 30 June 2016. Since then, it has received many security patches but nothing has changed functionally and although 14.2 is super stable, it is also getting stale, in particular its default KDE desktop.
In all that time since the release of Slackware 14.2, the distro has been heavily worked on, and the slackware-current development release is a joy to work with, containing the latest tools and desktop environments.

The frequent and sometimes intrusive updates to -current are keeping the less knowledgeable Slackware users at bay, they prefer 14.2 since that requires minimal maintenance and won’t break after a careless upgrade.

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A Long Wait Will Soon be Over: Slackware 15.0 Coming Up

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Slack

As Slackware fans will have duly noted the team around the BDFL are finally one step, actually untold steps, closer to nearing the long awaited 15.0 release. And high time it is as outdated as 14.2 now is something like 4.5 years into its life. Is anyone actually still running this, except on servers? On 7 December 2020 it was announced that alienBOB's latest Plasma 5 packages made it into the Slackware-current branch for testing and with that they finally fully replaced KDE 4. Shortly after XFCE 4.16 followed and now even includes the Whisker menu.

That was soon followed by a mass rebuild against glibc-2.32 which is a pain of you're running current or just installed somenthing like Slackel which is tracking Slackware-current. Never mind, that's why it's called a testing ground. Currently the kernel is Linux 5.10.12. With such a modern base that seems like a good position for an upcoming release.

I have to admit that with stable getting so old I have switched to other distributions years ago and which are also running nicely. Mostly based on another old favorite, Debian/Devuan, but also Mageia and openMandriva for testing. They didn't make the cut though. Until recently I got my Slackware fix only via alien's LiveSlak project, the Plasma edition, which is in all honesty a good way to run Slackware and almost a distribution in itself. You get a ready made vanilla Slackware enhanced by a few choice packages from alienBOB. In between some quick testing of where Slackware development was at with a quick install from a Slackware FTP server and since recently the release of the aforementioned Slackel 7.4 with Openbox, a perfect base to add Plasma packages.

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Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

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    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.