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Audiocasts/Show: RasPad, Ubuntu Podcast, BSDNow

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • The RasPad 3 - Unboxing and Assembly (Full review tomorrow!!!)

    The RasPad 3 is a neat project that enables you to turn your Raspberry Pi 4 into a full tablet! In this video, I'll unbox the RasPad 3 and I'll also show you the entire assembly process. Be sure to check out my full review as well.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E15 – Tanks Crash Clash

    This week we’ve been learning Davinci Resolve and instrumenting our house with DHT11 sensors. We round up the goings on from the Ubuntu community and discuss our favourite picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 15 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • BSDNow 407: The jail Detail

    Confining the omnipotent root, Jails with ZFS and PF on DigitalOcean, NomadBSD 130R is out, KDE Plasma Wayland on FreeBSD, Firefox under FreeBSD with Privacy, Using NetBSD’s pkgsrc everywhere, and more.

helloSystem - FreeBSD Based OS Brings another Promising Release 0.5.0

Filed under
BSD

The helloSystem team brings another promising release with its latest version 0.5.0. And gives hope to users as a free alternative to macOS.
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FreeBSD from a NetBSD user’s perspective

Filed under
BSD

I’ve been a NetBSD developer for three years and it’s been my primary operating system for a long time too - on everything: routers, laptops, Raspberry Pis, PowerPC mac minis, Vortex86 embedded boards, and servers.

I’ve recently been using FreeBSD a lot at work. We have a lot of servers and embedded boards running it, and I was given the option of installing anything I wanted on my workstation. I chose FreeBSD to maintain a separation of BSDs between my work and home life Wink

I thought I’d write a little bit about some differences that stand out to me. Since everyone that knows me well knows that typical use cases like web hosting aren’t really my jam, and I’m more of an embedded, audio, and graphics person, maybe I can offer a more uncommon perspective.

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DragonFlyBSD 6.0 Is Performing Very Well Against Ubuntu Linux, FreeBSD 13.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Earlier this month in our initial benchmarking of DragonFlyBSD 6.0 we found DragonFlyBSD 6.0 performing much better than DragonFlyBSD 5.8, but how does that put its performance up against FreeBSD 13.0 and Ubuntu Linux for reference? Here are such benchmarks in our latest benchmarking of DragonFlyBSD 6.0, FreeBSD 13.0 (with both GCC and Clang), and Ubuntu Linux.
Today's round of benchmarking is looking at the performance of:
- DragonFlyBSD 5.8.3
- DragonFlyBSD 6.0
- Ubuntu 21.04
- FreeBSD 13.0
- FreeBSD 13.0 + GCC (using the GCC 10.2 compiler from ports rather than the default LLVM Clang 11 compiler, so to have a run matching the other operating systems defaulting to GCC.)

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Audiocasts/Shows: Debian/KDE Neon, BSDNow, TLLTS, Slimbook and Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Back to Debian - Distrohop Week

    I installed KDE Neon on the main studio PC and not really liking it. Let's just go back to Debian and my first livestream install when I had 1,000 subs.

  • BSDNow 403: The Linuxulator Investment

    Why You Should Use BSD Licensing for Your Next Open Source Project or Product, Update on FreeBSD Foundation Investment in Linuxulator, OPNsense 21.1.5 released, FreeBSD meetings on the Desktop, Running FreeBSD jails with containerd 1.5, Markdown, DocBook, and the quest for semantic documentation on NetBSD.org, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 907

    replacing technology, 3d printing, grills

  • FINALLY an affordable LINUX LAPTOP? - Slimbook Essential 14

    today we FINALLY have an affordable Linux laptop to review! This here is the Slimbook Essential, basically the least expensive laptop you can get from this Spanish Linux hardware manufacturer, coming in at 550 euros, 20% Value added tax included. Let's take a look at what you get at that price point!

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E11 – Pigs Eating Shot

    This week we got a 65% keyboard and played Pokemon Snap. We round up the community news and events, then some picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 11 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

NetBSD 9.2 released

Filed under
BSD

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 9.2 "Nakatomi Socrates", the second update of the NetBSD 9 release branch.

As well as the usual bug, stability, and security fixes, this release includes: support for exporting ZFS filesystems over NFS, various updates to the bozotic HTTP daemon, improvements to ARM 32-bit and Linux compatibility, fread() performance improvements, support for the TP-Link TL-WN821N V6 wireless adapter, support for the Allwinner H5 cryptographic accelerator, Pinebook Pro display brightness fixes, new defaults for kern.maxfiles, and accessibility improvements for the default window manager configuration.

Read more

Also: Announcing NetBSD 9.2 (May 12, 2021)

DragonFlyBSD 6.0 Performance Is Looking Great - Initial Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

I am currently testing DragonFlyBSD 6.0 on multiple systems and will in turn compare DragonFlyBSD 6.0 against the recent FreeBSD 13.0 (the recent FreeBSD 13.0 also brings its own performance improvements) and various Linux distributions. Upon early testing though of DragonFlyBSD 5.8.3 as the prior stable release against the new DragonFlyBSD 6.0, there is nice uplift in many benchmarks.

Today's tests are on an Intel Core i9 10980XE workstation and the uplift found from DragonFlyBSD 6.0 even with still using the same GCC 8.3 compiler release and HAMMER2 on both releases is looking quite good.

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FreeBSD on the Pine H6

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
BSD

Pine makes a bunch of different bits of hardware. The Pine64 was a bit of a breakthrough in single-board-computing (SBC) – very different from the Raspberry Pi, and a lot more open-source. We could argue about just how open it is, but it did spawn the Pinebook and the Pinebook Pro. I hear the latter is really nice, and runs OpenBSD and FreeBSD too. Somewhat forgotten amongst all these is the Pine H6.

When the A64 came out originally (was that 2018?), closely followed by the H6, the H6 was clearly a more-capable board: more memory, even if you can’t access all 4GiB that is soldered on, eMMC, barrel power-connection. The Pine64-LTS remedied a lot of that, and the H6 was then also surpassed in compute-power by the Rock64 and RockPro. By that time, though, I had ordered a couple.

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NetBSD: aiomixer, X/Open Curses and ncurses, and other news

Filed under
BSD

aiomixer is an application that I've been maintaining outside of NetBSD for a few years. It was available as a package, and was a "graphical" (curses, terminal-based) mixer for NetBSD's audio API, inspired by programs like alsamixer. For some time I've thought that it should be integrated into the NetBSD base system - it's small and simple, very useful, and many developers and users had it installed (some told me that they would install it on all of their machines that needed audio output). For my particular use case, as well as my NetBSD laptop, I have some small NetBSD machines around the house plugged into speakers that I play music from. Sometimes I like to SSH into them to adjust the playback volume, and it's often easier to do visually than with mixerctl(1).

However, there was one problem: when I first wrote aiomixer 2 years ago, I was intimidated by the curses API, so opted to use the Curses Development Kit instead. This turned out to be a mistake, as not only was CDK inflexible for an application like aiomixer, it introduced a hard dependency on ncurses.

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NomadBSD 130R-20210508 is now available!

Filed under
BSD

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 130R-20210508.

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More in Tux Machines

Here’s Why Switching to Linux Makes Sense in 2021

Linux does have several benefits over Windows and macOS in certain areas. People are realizing it, and it is slowly gaining popularity in the desktop OS market. Of course, the majority of desktop users still swear by Windows or macOS, but a greater number of users are trying out new Linux distributions to see if they can switch to Linux. They may have heard good things about Linux as a desktop choice, or just want to try something different while confined to their homes. Who knows? Here, I will be presenting you all the good reasons why Linux makes more sense in 2021. Read more

today's leftovers

  • LHS Episode #416: The Weekender LXXIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Donation button removed

    Over the years, I have blown hot and cold over whether to have a donation button. Did take it down for awhile, about a year ago I think. I received an email asking if can send me a bank cheque, which reminded me about that donation button. I declined the offer. I really don't need donations. It is really my pleasure to upload blog reports about EasyOS, Puppy, DIY hiking gear, and all the rest that have posted about. Ibiblio.org is still very kindly hosting downloads, and I also went back to the Puppy Forum.

  • Akademy 2021 – I

    I am still digesting the load of information that Marc Mutz gave in his intense training session last night between 6 and almost 11 p.m. about C++/STL history, containers, iterators, allocators, the Non-Owning Interface Idiom and all that other good stuff. Great job Marc.

  • Stuck Updates Fix

    When rolling out a new feature that lets you skip (offline) updates on boot-up earlier this week we have messed up and also brought in a nasty bug that prevents updates from applying. Unfortunately we can’t automatically rectify this problem because, well, updates are never applied. In case you find Discover showing the same updates over and over again, even after rebooting to apply the update, you may be affected.

  • AWS SSM Parameters

    If you are not familiar with the Parameter Store it provides hierarchical storage for config data, strings, and other values. As well as being used for storing private information the parameter store provides a public namespace for SUSE, /aws/service/suse, which is now being leveraged to provide the latest image id’s for all active SUSE images.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Steam on ChromeOS: Not a Rumor Anymore - Boiling Steam

    If you follow us or other sources like Chrome Unboxed you are by now aware that there’s ample rumors about Google/Valve working on bringing Steam on ChromeOS. We know the technology pieces are there, as recently discussed with Luke Short in our recent podcast. However, we are still waiting for an official announcement that would turn the expected rumors into reality.

  • First American Financial Pays Farcical $500K Fine

    In May 2019, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that the website of mortgage settlement giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] was leaking more than 800 million documents — many containing sensitive financial data — related to real estate transactions dating back 16 years. This week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settled its investigation into the matter after the Fortune 500 company agreed to pay a paltry penalty of less than $500,000.

  • How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

    Estonia is no stranger to the cyber threat posed by Russia. Back in 2007, a decision to relocate a Soviet-era war memorial from central Tallinn to a military cemetery sparked a diplomatic spat with its neighbor and former overlord. There were protests and angry statements from Russian diplomats. And just as the removal works started, Estonia became the target of what was at the time the biggest cyberattack against a single country.

    The Estonian government called the incident an act of cyberwarfare and blamed Russia for it. Moscow has denied any involvement.

    The attack made Estonia realize that it needed to start treating cyber threats in the same way as physical attacks.

  • Most Businesses That Pay Off After Ransomware Hack Hit With Second Attack: Study [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The study surveyed nearly 1,300 security professionals around the world and found that 80 percent of businesses that paid after a ransomware attack suffered a second attack. Of those hit a second time, 46 percent believed it came from the same group that did the first attack.

    Censuswide, which performed the study on behalf of the international cybersecurity company Cybereason, found that 25 percent of organizations hit by a ransomware attack were forced to close. In addition, 29 percent were forced to eliminate jobs.

Kernel: Oracle, UPower, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Oracle Sends Out Latest Linux Patches So Trenchboot Can Securely Launch The Kernel - Phoronix

    Trenchboot continues to be worked on for providing boot integrity technologies that allow for multiple roots of trust around boot security and integrity. Oracle engineers on Friday sent out their latest Linux kernel patches so it can enjoy a "Secure Launch" by the project's x86 dynamic launch measurements code. The latest kernel patches are a second revision to patches sent out last year around the Trenchboot launch support for enhancing the integrity and security of the boot process. This kernel work goes along with Trenchboot support happening for GRUB.

  • Nearly A Decade Later, UPower Still Working Towards 1.0 Release

    For nearly one decade there has been talk of UPower 1.0 while in 2021 that still has yet to materialize for this former "DeviceKit-Power" project but at least now there is UPower v0.99.12 as the first release in two years. UPower 1.0 has yet to materialize and it certainly isn't advancing these days like it was in the early 2010s. With Thursday's UPower 0.99.12 release the key changes to land over the past two years are supporting more device types and power reporting for newer Apple iPhone smartphones like the iPhone XR, XS, and other newer models.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. Tracing in the Linux kernel is constantly improving. Tracing was officially added to Linux in 2008. Since then, more tooling has been constantly added to help out with visibility. The work is still ongoing, with Perf, ftrace, Lttng, and eBPF. User space tooling is expanding and as the kernel gets more complex, so does the need for facilitating seeing what is going on under the hood.