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BSD

GhostBSD 21.11.24 ISO is now available

Filed under
BSD

This new ISO contains kernel, OS, and software updates. In addition, I added a new command-line software called ghostbsd-version that gives you the GhostBSD version, FreeBSD version, kernel version, and OS version. At the date of this release, if you run ghostbsd-version or ghostbsd-version -v, it should output 21.11.24. This version number will be increment by the date of new packages built on packages every update performed. The ISO version is now following the last package's build version instead of an ISO's build date in the hope of removing confusion about the ISO version.

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Where in the Stack?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

For one of my projects – not KDE-related – I have a parser, written in YACC / bison. To build the project, the bison grammar needs to be compiled (by the bison command) to C, and then the C can be compiled to the final executable. On my workstation, the bison step would fail when the build was run one-process-at-a-time in KDE konsole. Workarounds were really weird: build with a -j flag to build with more processes at once, or pipe the build-output to cat, or run the build in xterm instead of konsole. So where is the bug? In konsole, in bison, or in something underneath? It’s definitely something to do with the terminal emulator: here’s a screenshot of bison compiling a sample file successfully in xterm, and crashing in konsole, roxterm and alacritty. It crashes in cool-retro-term as well, but leaves the terminal itself in a messed-up-state. It also crashes on the FreeBSD text console.

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TrueNAS SCALE Goes Far Beyond a Simple Network Storage

Filed under
BSD

Built on the shoulders of TrueNAS CORE, TrueNAS SCALE adds Docker Containers, VMs (KVM), and scale-out ZFS storage capabilities.

TrueNAS SCALE is an exciting new addition to the TrueNAS software family. If you are unaware with TrueNAS CORE, it’s probably the best known and powerful free and open source NAS software out there.

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FreeBSD 12.3-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD


The second RC build of the 12.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.3-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.3-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.3-RC2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.3-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.3-RC2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.3-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.3-RC2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.3" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.3-RC1 includes:

o Updates to the igc(4) driver.

o BEAGLEBONE and RPI3 SoC images have been removed, due to late
  discovered issues.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.3
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.3R/relnotes/

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.3-RC2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

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FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report 3rd Quarter 2021

Filed under
BSD

This report covers FreeBSD related projects for the period between July and September, and is the third of four planned reports for 2021, and contains 42 entries.

The third quarter of 2021 was quite active in lots of different areas, so the report covers a bunch of interesting work including but not limited to boot performance, compile-time analysis, hole-punching support, various drivers, ZFS raidz expansion, an update to the sound mixer, and many more.

Regrettably, the status report got a bit delayed, but we hope that the aphorism better late than never can apply here.

Yours,
Daniel Ebdrup Jensen, with status hat on.

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FreeBSD 12.3-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The first RC build of the 12.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.3-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.3-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.3-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.3-RC1 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 RPI2
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.3-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.3-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.3-RC1 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.3-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.3-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.3" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.3-BETA3 includes:

o A fix to the cd(4) driver to improve TOC access validation.

A list of changes since 12.2-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.3
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.3R/relnotes/

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.3-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now, TLLTS, and LinusTechTips

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • BSD Now 428: Cult of BSD

    OpenBSD Part 1: How it all started, Explaining top(1) on FreeBSD, Measuring power efficiency of a CPU frequency scheduler on OpenBSD, CultBSD, a whole lot of BSD bits, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 930

    3d printing, joel gets callled out, what tech gifts

  • You had ONE JOB, Linus! | Reacting to the Daily Driver Challenge - Invidious

    LinusTechTips, if you're not aware, is one of the most popular tech YouTube channels out there... yet somehow, Linus has never daily-driven Linux. Never even tried to! With the advent of the Steam Deck, though, Linus has come around to the idea of "Linux Gaming" and challenged his friend Luke to use Linux on their home rigs. Somehow Linus had a pretty rough go of it but ultimately they were (mostly) able to complete the first task of their challenge.

wayland 1.19.91

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD
This is the alpha release for wayland 1.20.

This release contains the following major changes:

- FreeBSD support has been entirely upstreamed and has been added to
  our continuous integration system.
- The autotools build system has been dropped. Meson has replaced it.
- A few protocol additions: wl_surface.offset allows clients to update
  a surface's buffer offset independently from the buffer,
  wl_output.name and description allow clients to identify outputs
  without depending on xdg-output-unstable-v1.
- In protocol definitions, events have a new "type" attribute and can
  now be marked as destructors.
- A number of bug fixes, including a race condition when destroying
  proxies in multi-threaded clients.

Full commit history below.

Alex Richardson (17):
      Use MAP_FAILED instead of (void *) -1
      os-wrappers-test.c: Correctly forward arguments to fcntl
      Change wl_os_dupfd_cloexec minfd to be int
      os-wrappers-test: Handle fcntl() being declared as a macro
      Use epoll-shim to emulate epoll(7) on FreeBSD
      gitlab-ci: update ci-templates to the latest commit
      gitlab-ci: remove duplicated lines in ci-templates include
      gitlab-ci: Fix copy-paste error in a comment
      gitlab-ci: add junit reports to the debian builder
      Support reading ucred from the socket on FreeBSD
      shm: Add mmap+memmove fallback if mremap() does not exist
      Use /dev/fd instead of /proc/self/fd
      test-runner: Implement is_debugger_attached() for FreeBSD
      test-helpers: use sysctl() to count open fds on FreeBSD
      Detect FreeBSD versions with broken MSG_CMSG_CLOEXEC
      Allow event-loop signal tests to pass on FreeBSD
      gitlab-ci: add a FreeBSD test job

Alexander Dunaev (1):
      cursor: add one more directory to XCURSORPATH

Damian Hobson-Garcia (1):
      server: stop wl_display event loop from any context

Daniel Stone (10):
      ci: Add comments, rename build stages
      ci: Parameterise and template build
      ci: Add AArch64 build
      ci: Add ARMv7 build
      ci: Only run ci-fairy on MRs
      ci: Use consistent YAML indendation
      ci: Add release builds
      ci: Use appropriate concurrency level
      ci: Use Werror
      ci: Sanitise build and install paths

Derek Foreman (6):
      client: Refactor wl_proxy_destroy critical section
      client: Add new proxy marshalling functions with flags
      scanner: Use the new atomic marshal/destroy function
      connection: Rename wl_buffer
      tests: Destroy custom global object
      debug: Fix printing of new ids

Duncan McIntosh (1):
      wayland-shm: Check the size of sealed memory if ignoring SIGBUS handlers

Fergus Dall (6):
      connection-test: Encode size in message headers correctly
      connection: Handle non-nullable strings in wl_connection_demarshal
      util: Avoid undefined behaviour in for_each_helper
      server: Fix undefined behavior in wl_socket_init_for_display_name
      connection-test: Pad out strings with null bytes
      os-wrappers-test: Make syscall intercepts work with sanitizers

James Hilliard (2):
      meson: only require cpp for tests
      build: add option to disable tests

James Legg (2):
      scanner: Use descriptions in entries
      tests: Test wayland-scanner with a description in an entry

Jonas Ådahl (2):
      ci: Use ci-fairy to check for Signed-off-by
      protocol: Add wl_surface.offset

Manuel Stoeckl (3):
      client: print discarded events in debug log
      connection, client: Avoid locale-dependent float printing
      client: handle fcntl error on bad fd in wl_display_connect

Marius Vlad (1):
      src: Add missing new lines to log messages

Matt Hoosier (1):
      protocol: mention that buffers with alpha are assumed premultiplied

Michael Weiss (1):
      meson: Only require expat when building wayland-scanner

Nick Diego Yamane (1):
      Document serial param usage in wl_pointer.set_cursor

Olivier Fourdan (1):
      shm: Relax shm_pool_create_buffer() validity check

Olivier Tilloy (1):
      cursor: Try to fall back to a default xcursor theme first

Pekka Paalanen (2):
      CI: turn on ASan and UBSan
      wayland-util: avoid memcpy(NULL) in wl_array_copy()

Simon McVittie (1):
      build: Include the Wayland minor version in libraries' ABI versions

Simon Ser (18):
      build: re-open master for regular development
      client: assert queue display matches proxy
      build: drop autotools
      build: replace assembly embedding with Python script
      protocol: drop reference to wl_drm
      shm: remove wl_shm_buffer.pool NULL checks
      protocol: allow immediate wl_buffer.destroy if not re-used
      shm: add safety assertions
      protocol: clarify wl_seat.name description
      shm: document wl_shm_buffer
      connection: print array size
      cursor: rename load_default_theme to load_fallback_theme
      cursor: remove unused wl_cursor_theme.name
      protocol: mention that keymap mapping must be read-only
      protocol: add note about wl_output.done in events
      protocol: add wl_output.{name,description}
      protocol: wl_shm uses pre-multiplied alpha
      build: bump to version 1.19.91 for the alpha release

Tadeo Kondrak (2):
      protocol: Add type attribute to events
      protocol: Specify wl_callback::done to be a destructor event

Tobias Stoeckmann (2):
      cursor: fix CVE-2013-2003
      cursor: fix crash with weird input files

Vlad Zahorodnii (1):
      server: add wl_display getter for wl_global

sheepwall (1):
      server: remove duplicate include

git tag: 1.19.91

Read more

Also: Wayland 1.20 Alpha Released With Upstreamed FreeBSD Support, Autotools Nuked

FreeBSD 12.3-BETA3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD
The third BETA build of the 12.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.3-BETA3 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.3-BETA3 i386 GENERIC
o 12.3-BETA3 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.3-BETA3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.3-BETA3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.3-BETA3 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.3-BETA3 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 RPI2
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.3-BETA3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.3-BETA3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.3-BETA3 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.3-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.3-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.3/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.3" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.3-BETA2 includes:

o A fix for use after free in combination with EVDEV_SUPPORT has been
  added to the usb(4) stack.

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.3-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.3-BETA3/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-0474575e4743c09ef
  eu-north-1 region: ami-086d14e67901fbe18
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0070d860537d0ded8
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0b3dc01c43c0912fe
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0980e2d73f5d45dde
  eu-south-1 region: ami-0e7f23b4407ea2984
  eu-west-1 region: ami-07e6a1fef7da32d00
  ap-northeast-3 region: ami-05abadc5c531ee229
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0d19b72fb447f1351
  me-south-1 region: ami-04594b13da5f816c8
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0a22abde412c924dd
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0b1c3ebd4e3c3d110
  ca-central-1 region: ami-00a7cbd0c72d71f34
  ap-east-1 region: ami-04764a6d430eee081
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0eeeacb4006f6c3dc
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-090d2e10d03f4e7e2
  eu-central-1 region: ami-08b58933a7123b517
  us-east-1 region: ami-01c2add58c60cdaa0
  us-east-2 region: ami-089ef8724c5788778
  us-west-1 region: ami-09675dff8007c2120
  us-west-2 region: ami-04dcf23effaa07fa2

These AMI IDs can be retrieved from the Systems Manager Parameter Store
in each region using the keys:

	/aws/service/freebsd/amd64/base/ufs/12.3/BETA3

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  af-south-1 region: ami-0ddb2ab71276a1cd2
  eu-north-1 region: ami-067904d4b39b13b52
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0914a27f72a3defcb
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0a067d26bbb475270
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0445d628b7727bbc0
  eu-south-1 region: ami-0f0c5ab6ae5a0222e
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0fe3c1f09940fc2a5
  ap-northeast-3 region: ami-041c97971472b0b2a
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0dc899119ea13ebbe
  me-south-1 region: ami-01aba86d507b0caad
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0177cd37b15b7cf32
  sa-east-1 region: ami-00d3752ace91695cc
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0092b0802c7929b82
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0c14a86ca5234df3f
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-09b5c8e04397b1a0c
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0bd853e50e9cbd099
  eu-central-1 region: ami-079e8694c2b8b9b71
  us-east-1 region: ami-0006ee96beca8fec2
  us-east-2 region: ami-0de58b11cdcc18d5b
  us-west-1 region: ami-0c96f66557b5771af
  us-west-2 region: ami-025360ab398d1f77a

These AMI IDs can be retrieved from the Systems Manager Parameter Store
in each region using the keys:

	/aws/service/freebsd/arm64/base/ufs/12.3/BETA3

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.3-BETA3
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.3-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt/Fear-mongering/Dramatisation From ESET Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
BSD
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: Linux Stuff and GPUs

  • Facebook/Meta Tackling Transparent Page Placement For Tiered-Memory Linux Systems - Phoronix

    Back during the Linux 5.15 cycle Intel contributed an improvement for tiered memory systems where less used memory pages could be demoted to slower tiers of memory storage. But once demoted that kernel infrastructure didn't have a means of promoting those demoted pages back to the faster memory tiers should they become hot again, though now Facebook/Meta engineers have been working on such functionality.  Prior to the Linux 5.15 kernel, during the memory reclaim process when the system RAM was under memory pressure was to simply toss out cold pages. However, with Linux 5.15 came the ability to shift those cold pages to any slower memory tiers. In particular, modern and forthcoming servers with Optane DC persistent memory or CXL-enabled memory, etc. Therefore the pages are still accessible if needed but not occupying precious system DRAM if they aren't being used and to avoid just flushing them out or swapping to disk. 

  • Linux 5.17 To Boast Latency Optimization For AF_UNIX Sockets - Phoronix

    Net-next has been queuing a number of enticing performance optimizations ahead of the Linux 5.17 merge window kicking off around the start of the new year. Covered already was a big TCP optimization and a big improvement for csum_partial() that is used in the network code for checksum computation. The latest optimization is improving the AF_UNIX code path for those using AF_UNIX sockets for local inter-process communication.  A new patch series was queued up on Friday in net-next for improving the AF_UNIX code. That patch series by Kuniyuki Iwashima of Amazon Japan is ultimately about replacing AF_UNIX sockets' single big lock with per-hash locks. The series replaces the AF_UNIX big lock and also as part of the series has a speed-up to the autobind behavior. 

  • Nvidia Pascal GPU, DX12 and VKD3D: Slideshow time! - Boiling Steam

    So Horizon Zero Dawn had a sale recently on Fanatical, and I thought… OK I’ll grab it! It’s time. I first installed it on my workstation that only has a GTX1060 3GB GPU – not a workhorse but a decent card nonetheless for low-to-medium end gaming. I knew very well that Horizon Zero Dawn is a DX12 game and that Pascal architecture (Nvidia 10xx basically) and earlier versions do not play very well with DX12 games running through vkd3d-proton, the DX12 to Vulkan translation layer. Still, I could imagine getting somewhere around 30 FPS on low-to-medium settings, and use FSR if necessary to get to better framerates. Nothing prepared me for the performance I was about to experience.

Linux 5.16-rc3

So rc3 is usually a bit larger than rc2 just because people had some
time to start finding things.

So too this time, although it's not like this is a particularly big
rc3. Possibly partly due to the past week having been Thanksgiving
week here in the US. But the size is well within the normal range, so
if that's a factor, it's not been a big one.

The diff for rc3 is mostly drivers, although part of that is just
because of the removal of a left-over MIPS Netlogic driver which makes
the stats look a bit wonky, and is over a third of the whole diff just
in itself.

If you ignore that part, the statistics look a bit more normal, but
drivers still dominate (network drivers, sound and gpu are the big
ones, but there is noise all over). Other than that there's once again
a fair amount of selftest (mostly networking), along with core
networking, some arch updates - the bulk of it from a single arm64
uaccess patch, although that's mostly because it's all pretty small -
and random other changes.

Full shortlog below.

Please test,

             Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.16-rc3 Released With Alder Lake ITMT Fix, Other Driver Fixes - Phoronix

Audiocasts/Shows: Endless OS 4.0.0, GIMP, BSD, KDE, and Elementary

today's howtos

  1. How to install FreeOffice 2021 on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux

    One of the best free alternatives to Microsoft Office is FreeOffice, developed by a German software company- SoftMaker. Recently, they have upgraded their Office suite to version 21. And here we learn the steps to install FreeOffice 2021 version on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux using the command terminal. This free office suite is a part of the commercial one from the same developers known as SoftMaker Office 21 (also available for Linux), of course, the premium will have more features but that doesn’t mean the free version- FreeOffice 2021 deprives to full fill all daily office documents (MS-Word alternative) related requirements. It offers a Microsoft office ribbon-like interface and three modules- TextMaker 21 to create documents; PlanMaker 21 to create sheets (Excel alternative) and Presentations 21 for making slides like MS-Powerpoint.

  2. Pin Custom Folders to Left Panel ‘Files’ Icon Context Menu in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    In Windows 10, user may right-click on the ‘File Explorer’ icon on panel to access pinned folders (e.g., Desktop, Downloads and Documents) quickly. Ubuntu has first implemented this feature in Ubuntu 21.10, though it seems to be not working properly due to bug. Ubuntu 20.04 may manually add the context (right-click) menu options so user can right-click on the ‘Files’ icon to choose open favorite folders quickly.

  3. How To Install Perl on AlmaLinux 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Perl on AlmaLinux 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Perl (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language) is a general-purpose programming language originally developed for text manipulation and now used for a wide range of tasks including system administration, web development, network programming, GUI development, and more. The major features of Perl are easy to use, supports object-oriented and procedural programming languages, and has built-in support for processing text. The most impressive feature of Perl is that it supports a large collection of third-party modules. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Perl programming language on AlmaLinux 8. You can follow the same instructions for Rocky Linux.

  4. How to play Total War: WARHAMMER on Linux

    Total War: Warhammer is a turn-based real-time tactics video game developed by Creative Assembly and published by Sega. It takes place in the War Hammer 40K universe. Here’s how you can play it on your Linux PC.

  5. How to install Funkin' Vs. Camellia on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' Vs. Camellia on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.