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BSD

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

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KDE
BSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button.

Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those.

All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update.

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Project Trident 19.08 Now Available

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BSD

This update includes the FreeBSD fixes for the “vesa” graphics driver for legacy-boot systems. The system can once again be installed on legacy-boot systems.

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OpenBSD and FreeBSD Updates

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD -stable binary packages

    The OpenBSD base system has received binary updates for security and some other important problems in the base OS through syspatch(8) for the last few releases.

    We are pleased to announce that we now also provide selected binary packages for the most recent release. These are built from the -stable ports tree which receives security and a few other important fixes: [...]

  • FreeBSD Around the World

    One of our major goals this year is to increase FreeBSD awareness around the world. I’m excited about upcoming events, like the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit, where we are giving a talk on FreeBSD. But first, I wanted to highlight some of the events we’ve attended over the past few months. I have been pretty bad about writing event reports, so I’m summarizing some of them here. It’s a good thing our Marketing Director isn’t local, otherwise she would be camping in our office forcing me to write the reports.

Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200059.3

Filed under
Security
BSD

HardenedBSD-12-STABLE-v1200059.3

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Instant Workstation

Filed under
KDE
BSD

Some considerable time ago I wrote up instructions on how to set up a FreeBSD machine with the latest KDE Plasma Desktop. Those instructions, while fairly short (set up X, install the KDE meta-port, .. and that’s it) are a bit fiddly.

So – prompted slightly by a Twitter exchange recently – I’ve started a mini-sub-project to script the installation of a desktop environment and the bits needed to support it. To give it at least a modicum of UI, dialog(1) is used to ask for an environment to install and a display manager.

The tricky bits – pointed out to me after I started – are hardware support, although a best-effort is better than having nothing, I think.

In any case, in a VBox host it’s now down to running a single script and picking Plasma and SDDM to get a usable system for me. Other combinations have not been tested, nor has system-hardware-setup. I’ll probably maintain it for a while and if I have time and energy it’ll be tried with nVidia (those work quite well on FreeBSD) and AMD (not so much, in my experience) graphics cards when I shuffle some machines around.

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DragonFly 5.6.2 released

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BSD

Because of the recent tcp keepalive change and some other updates, DragonFly 5.6 has been updated to 5.6.2. See my release email, and update the normal way. You will need to update your installed dports.

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Also: DragonFlyBSD 5.6.2 Released With Disruptive Change To Help Chromium, Ported Apps

DragonFly 5.6.2 tagged

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BSD

I tagged 5.6.2 and built it this morning:

http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/commits/2019-August/719259.html

It includes the recent tcp keepalive changes and some other work.
You'll want to update dports, too.

I'm uploading the 5.6.2 image as I type. You can rebuild using the
normal process on an existing 5.6.0 or 5.6.1 system:

> cd /usr/src
> git pull
> make buildworld
> make buildkernel
> make installkernel
> make installworld
> make upgrade

and of course

> pkg upgrade

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Porting wine to amd64 on NetBSD

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BSD
  • Porting wine to amd64 on NetBSD, second evaluation report

    As getting Wine to work with WoW64 support was of foremost importance, my focus was on compat32 dependency packages without which Wine's functionality would be limited and more importantly untestable. Initially, being unaware of what to expect, I just wanted Wine to run, at the earliest. So, with outmost support from mentors, the consensus was to install libs from 32-bit packages to ${PREFIX}/lib/32 and ignore everything else that came with the respective packages.

    I had most of the compat32 packages ready after a couple of days. And it was time we gave Wine a whirl. Well, the build was successful. However, I had problems with 32-bit Xorg. The applications which came packaged with Wine worked fine, but, other Microsoft Windows applications like notepad++, Mario etc had a hard time running. Additionally, I noticed that fontconfig went wild and crashed spewing errors symptomatic of Wine (32-bit) not playing nice with the fontconfig lib that came with 32-bit Xorg package. On top of this, I found that build failed on certain machines due to unavailability of headers. This made us reconsider our decision to install 32-bit libs to ${PREFIX}/lib/32 and ignore everything else which included headers and binaries.

  • Wine On 64-bit NetBSD Is Now In Much Better Shape Thanks To GSoC

    One of the many interesting Google Summer of Code (GSoC) projects this year has been to improve the Wine support on NetBSD. Thanks to student developer Naveen Narayanan, that is becoming a reality.

NetBSD 9.0 release process has started

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BSD

If you have been following source-changes, you may have noticed the creation of the netbsd-9 branch!

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Also: NetBSD 9.0 Prepping For Release With AArch64 Support, Kernel ASLR & Better NVMe Perf

BSD: OpenBSD for Security, DragonFlyBSD's New Server

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BSD
  • Need a Secure Operating System? Take a Look at OpenBSD

    The Unix-like OS offers support for a wide range of hardware platforms, third-party tools and an active, supportive community.

  • DragonFlyBSD Replacing Their 48-Core Opteron Infrastructure With Ryzen 9 3900X CPUs

    DragonFlyBSD is replacing their 48-core Opteron server named "Monster" with two of the new AMD Ryzen 9 3900X "Zen 2" processors as well as a spare Xeon server. DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon continues to be mighty impressed by AMD's latest processor offerings.

    Last year Matthew Dillon professed his love for the performance of AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs while in recent weeks he's been quick to get Ryzen 3000 CPUs working on DragonFlyBSD and has been impressed by their performance.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, Screwed Drivers, and Voting Machines

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 157 - Backdoors and snake oil in our cryptography

    Josh and Kurt talk about snakeoil cryptography at Black Hat and the new backdoored cryptography fight. Both of these problems will be with us for a very long time. These are fights worth fighting because it's the right thing to do.

  • Screwed Drivers – Signed, Sealed, Delivered

    Our analysis found that the problem of insecure drivers is widespread, affecting more than 40 drivers from at least 20 different vendors – including every major BIOS vendor, as well as hardware vendors like ASUS, Toshiba, NVIDIA, and Huawei. However, the widespread nature of these vulnerabilities highlights a more fundamental issue – all the vulnerable drivers we discovered have been certified by Microsoft. Since the presence of a vulnerable driver on a device can provide a user (or attacker) with improperly elevated privileges, we have engaged Microsoft to support solutions to better protect against this class of vulnerabilities, such as blacklisting known bad drivers.

  • Most states still aren’t set to audit paper ballots in 2020

    Despite some progress on voting security since 2016, most states in the US aren’t set to require an audit of paper ballots in the November 2020 election, according to a new report out this week from the Brennan Center for Justice.

    The report notes that experts and government officials have spent years recommending states adopt verifiable paper ballots for elections, but a handful still use electronic methods potentially vulnerable to cyberattacks. In 2016, 14 states used paperless machines, although the number today is 11, and the report estimates that no more than eight will use them in the 2020 election.

Linux Candy: WallGen – image generator tool

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!! Linux Candy is a new series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We’re only going to feature open-source software in this series. I’m not going to harp on about the tired proverb “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. But there’s a certain element of truth here. If you spend all day coding neural networks, mastering a new programming language, sit in meetings feeling bored witless, you’ll need some relief at the end of the day. And what better way by making your desktop environment a bit more memorable. Let’s start our candy adventure with WallGen. It’s a small command-line utility that generates HQ poly wallpapers with only a few text arguments for inputs. Depending on these arguments, you can create shape-based patterns, randomly filled surfaces, and even image-based patterns. Read more

Richard Brown: Changing of the Guard

After six years on the openSUSE Board and five as its Chairperson, I have decided to step down as Chair of the openSUSE Board effective today, August 19. This has been a very difficult decision for me to make, with reasons that are diverse, interlinked, and personal. Some of the key factors that led me to make this step include the time required to do the job properly, and the length of time I’ve served. Five years is more than twice as long as any of my predecessors. The time required to do the role properly has increased and I now find it impossible to balance the demands of the role with the requirements of my primary role as a developer in SUSE, and with what I wish to achieve outside of work and community. As difficult as it is to step back from something I’ve enjoyed doing for so long, I am looking forward to achieving a better balance between work, community, and life in general. Serving as member and chair of the openSUSE Board has been an absolute pleasure and highly rewarding. Meeting and communicating with members of the project as well as championing the cause of openSUSE has been a joyous part of my life that I know I will miss going forward. openSUSE won’t get rid of me entirely. While I do intend to step back from any governance topics, I will still be working at SUSE in the Future Technology Team. Following SUSE’s Open Source policy, we do a lot in openSUSE. I am especially looking forward to being able to focus on Kubic & MicroOS much more than I have been lately. As I’m sure it’s likely to be a question, I wish to make it crystal clear that my decision has nothing to do with the Board’s ongoing efforts to form an independent openSUSE Foundation. The Board’s decision to form a Foundation had my complete backing as Chairperson, and will continue to have as a regular openSUSE contributor. I have absolute confidence in the openSUSE Board; Indeed, I don’t think I would be able to make this decision at this time if I wasn’t certain that I was leaving openSUSE in good hands. On that note, SUSE has appointed Gerald Pfeifer as my replacement as Chair. Gerald is SUSE’s EMEA-based CTO, with a long history as a Tumbleweed user, an active openSUSE Member, and upstream contributor/maintainer in projects like GCC and Wine. Read more

An introduction to bpftrace for Linux

Bpftrace is a new open source tracer for Linux for analyzing production performance problems and troubleshooting software. Its users and contributors include Netflix, Facebook, Red Hat, Shopify, and others, and it was created by Alastair Robertson, a talented UK-based developer who has won various coding competitions. Linux already has many performance tools, but they are often counter-based and have limited visibility. For example, iostat(1) or a monitoring agent may tell you your average disk latency, but not the distribution of this latency. Distributions can reveal multiple modes or outliers, either of which may be the real cause of your performance problems. Bpftrace is suited for this kind of analysis: decomposing metrics into distributions or per-event logs and creating new metrics for visibility into blind spots. Read more