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FreeBSD 12.1-RC1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256

The first RC build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.1-RC1 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 i386 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.1-RC1 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.1-RC1 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 RPI2
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 PANDABOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.1-RC1 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.1-RC1 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.1/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.1" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA3 includes:

o A NULL pointer dereference that could lead to a system crash had been
  fixed.

o A fix to correctly implement pmap_page_is_mapped() on arm64 and riscv.

o A fix to tun(4) and tap(4) when destroying interfaces had been added.

o A fix to krping to notify sleeping threads of device removal had been
  added.

o Several updates to mlx5core, mlx5en(4), and mlx5ib(4).

o Several fixes in libusb(3) and xhci(4) have been added.

o Several SCTP and TCP fixes have been added.

A list of changes since 12.0-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.1
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.1-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.1-RC1/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0c2caa354f54dcc8e
  ap-south-1 region: ami-011f6d0b22b4179ae
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0e633b1e66b94dc5e
  eu-west-2 region: ami-06f77908c8875b5ce
  eu-west-1 region: ami-07d5b3d4ffa682d66
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0a0d9969831c99d3f
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-092398d1a41a67f27
  sa-east-1 region: ami-023dd6db41165f441
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0cf9fd10259cf4eb2
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0e255d1bb4a1f76f4
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0404212cff3236606
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0fea81c67debcba8b
  eu-central-1 region: ami-08e32f4e90fd250f4
  us-east-1 region: ami-0e6e401d0ffebd916
  us-east-2 region: ami-0d094195cae5bf901
  us-west-1 region: ami-04c1e10d06064e68d
  us-west-2 region: ami-02d0010139a9a494e

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-022e4644320e82ac1
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0e421a1864d53d226
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0bffb1c264a4b8d09
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0f596a538918dc9c8
  eu-west-1 region: ami-063c017d8b9086b55
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0b34ed283d7dd41ae
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0071602b3e78a8de0
  sa-east-1 region: ami-07986820662819e67
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0d9ee49739059957b
  ap-east-1 region: ami-00ae1e2b897eb6230
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0018127ce245410e0
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-02fa0380052cd268f
  eu-central-1 region: ami-01836dc7a9f273243
  us-east-1 region: ami-0018654c0af06d99d
  us-east-2 region: ami-06a4203b93836b927
  us-west-1 region: ami-09c5010072b44bd96
  us-west-2 region: ami-063fae5c2ec327807

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.1-RC1
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.1-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Announce: OpenSSH 8.1 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

OpenSSH 8.1 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

Read more

Project Trident 19.10 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

This is a general package update to the CURRENT release repository based upon TrueOS 19.10

Read more

FreeBSD 12.1-BETA3 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The third BETA build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.1-BETA3 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA3 i386 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA3 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA3 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.1-BETA3 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.1-BETA3 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA3 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 RPI2
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 PANDABOARD
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.1-BETA3 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.1-BETA3 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA3 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.1-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.1-BETA3 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.1/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.1" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA2 includes:

o An issue with imx6-based arm boards had been fixed.

o An issue with 64-bit long double types leading to link failures had
  been fixed.

o An overflow logic error had been fixed in fsck_msdosfs(8).

o An issue in destruction of robust mutexes had been fixed.

o Support for the '-vnP' flags to the zfs send subcommand had been
  added for bookmarks.

o The ixgbe(4) driver had been updated to prevent a potential system
  crash with certain 10Gb Intel NICs.

o A regression with the zfs send subcommand when using the '-n', '-P',
  and '-i' flags had been fixed.

o The freebsd-update(8) utility had been updated to include two new
  subcommands, updatesready and showconfig.

o Support for 'ps -H' had been added to kvm(3).

o An issue when compiling certain ports targeting Intel Atom CPUs had
  been fixed.

o A use-after-free in SCTP had been fixed.

o A regression that could lead to a system crash when using vmxnet3 had
  been fixed.

A list of changes since 12.0-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.1
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.1-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.1-BETA3/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-07085de4e26071c9e
  ap-south-1 region: ami-095bd806d8acfffb1
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0314542b8d7579bdd
  eu-west-2 region: ami-06ec921eb87ef4d7b
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0f0051c800be4091e
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0f109258a463177bb
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0224a1cb8e19333b8
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0536a86bff5f33356
  ca-central-1 region: ami-06709921360dccfa3
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0142af9336f6e529c
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0c439e0bc0c567dd3
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0fa770b7f07583b48
  eu-central-1 region: ami-0dfca49cf2ba89c43
  us-east-1 region: ami-06884b4e2e511590f
  us-east-2 region: ami-06c687665309d8b17
  us-west-1 region: ami-0dce597e8b07a6c6d
  us-west-2 region: ami-0e1f5ccdd2221b1d6

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0914805810f9fcca2
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0862409434d8089f2
  eu-west-3 region: ami-08e6dc501b060fa7c
  eu-west-2 region: ami-000f2362fef121710
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0c7a18e2b216a1b0c
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-047bc72d91ab47b95
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-082dcca6b9ac52f3f
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0a9fd8ffffc889430
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0d513e584801de3fa
  ap-east-1 region: ami-089a6b231886f692f
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-09c6f305a761c8712
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0ee5e02b85aecbef3
  eu-central-1 region: ami-08321cbac28d28d71
  us-east-1 region: ami-0a9c2fdd733536b50
  us-east-2 region: ami-0a5b46f4260ed9ca5
  us-west-1 region: ami-01aca4de517a623fe
  us-west-2 region: ami-0ac8b561fb3597d89

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.1-BETA3
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.1-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Programming, Open Hardware and BSD

Filed under
Development
BSD

                           

  • The rise of open-source computing

                             

                               

    is a set of open-source designs for microchips that was initially developed a decade ago at the University of California, Berkeley. These days it is attracting attention from many big technology firms, including Google, Nvidia and Qualcomm (see article). In August IBM made its Power chip designs open-source. These moves are welcome, for two reasons.

  • A Message to Our Readers

    We ask for your help in getting the word out (in addition to hopefully buying the issue when it's released). We know there are many thousands out there who no longer have bookstores that carry 2600 in their neighborhoods or who live in parts of the world where getting our publication has always been, at best, a challenge.

    Please show your support and buy this issue which you can then enjoy forever - and let everyone know what we're doing. Because if this is a success, we will be able to invest more into the magazine (paper and digital) to make it even better, as well as support more projects like HOPE.

  • Binary Hardening in IoT products

    Unfortunately, with few exceptions (notably Synology) we see there is very little coverage, and even Synology struggles to adopt basic hardening features like ASLR and stack guards.

    A perfect score, where all binaries had all 5 basic safety features, would result in a chart that looks like a regular pentagon. Instead, in most vendors’ cases, they struggle to achieve polygon status at all.

  •                

  • Milky Way v0.3 release

                     

                       

    Added
    LibreSSL as the default provider of SSL and TLS protocols
    Xenocara as the default provider of display server for the X Window System

  •                

  • sysupgrade(8) Added to OpenBSD 6.5

                     

                       

    In a move bound to be greeted with great enthusiasm, the newly-released Patch 012 for OpenBSD 6.5 adds sysupgrade(8) to the system.

FreeBSD 12.1-BETA2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The second BETA build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now
available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.1-BETA2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.1-BETA2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.1-BETA2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 PANDABOARD
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.1-BETA2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.1-BETA2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.1-BETA2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.1-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.1-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.1/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.1" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA1 includes:

o An off-by-one error in fusefs(5) had been fixed.

o A problem with in-place strip(1) on msdosfs(5) had been fixed.

o Stability fixes for mpr(4) and mps(4) have been merged from head.
  Note, support for these drivers have been removed for 32-bit powerpc.

o A regression had been fixed in the ping6(8) utility when the system is
  built without capsicum(4).

o A regression in the jme(4) driver had been fixed.

o A change to the bhyve(4) uart(4) driver had been fixed to support
  running under syzkaller.

o The WITH_PIE and WITH_BIND_NOW build knobs have been added.

o The 'updatesready' and 'showconfig' subcommands have been added to
  freebsd-update(8).

o The camcontrol(8) 'devtype' subcommand had been fixed to correctly
  report SATL devices.

A list of changes since 12.0-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.1
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.1-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.1-BETA2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0fde974647f2afb71
  ap-south-1 region: ami-08c5b6c3c67660000
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0d2295cb848b04044
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0defe97a58c32e336
  eu-west-1 region: ami-04794e03ec4994477
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0376260338b9a442c
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-030b542da16e02b36
  sa-east-1 region: ami-09fef4294a171f081
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0444d3dbbb3d973d2
  ap-east-1 region: ami-01870b4cd52cd63f5
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0ef470ae9dddc6d31
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0eb87756562803e37
  eu-central-1 region: ami-0d4f1151306798937
  us-east-1 region: ami-0aa4feba66441f8cb
  us-east-2 region: ami-073aac094f7a1e753
  us-west-1 region: ami-0b702fd3bc6987d9e
  us-west-2 region: ami-01e70706d53dcbd16

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-004e595acdaea9f8a
  ap-south-1 region: ami-043ee11f276cbac49
  eu-west-3 region: ami-0a3ca0207e9a78b42
  eu-west-2 region: ami-04cf3e3951b03f0e7
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0846d71aa6ed537a7
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0c8b2410ee65152eb
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-0d0495617fe90c04d
  sa-east-1 region: ami-08f2f3eb468314f2f
  ca-central-1 region: ami-0ea0dff5097085c4f
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0e8e411b892c424f3
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0552d07457be8afe7
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0f89f9d16dc3fc949
  eu-central-1 region: ami-05f5b271d7603e2cb
  us-east-1 region: ami-0dd2d517058d5c225
  us-east-2 region: ami-06d46829d315d1e20
  us-west-1 region: ami-047a11f3142a87598
  us-west-2 region: ami-0df2f50be88aa4073

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.1-BETA2
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.1-BETA2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

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Also: OpenBSD at EuroBSDcon 2019

DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support

Filed under
BSD

While the Copy-on-Write file-system shouldn't technically require fsck support, basic file-system consistency checking support has been implemented anyhow. In the initial implementation, the fsck code for HAMMER2 cannot repair any damaged file-system but can only verify that the file-system is intact.

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FreeBSD 12.1 Beta

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 12.1-BETA1 Now Available

    The first BETA build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

  • FreeBSD 12.1 Beta Released With Security Fixes, Pulls BearSSL Into Base

    FreeBSD 12.0 is already approaching one year old while FreeBSD 12.1 is now on the way as the next installment with various bug/security fixes and other alterations to this BSD operating system.

    FreeBSD 12.1 has many security/bug fixes throughout, no longer enables "-Werror" by default as a compiler flag (Update: This change is just for the GCC 4.2 compiler), has imported BearSSL into the FreeBSD base system as a lightweight TLS/SSL implementation, bzip2recover has been added, and a variety of mostly lower-level changes. More details can be found via the in-progress release notes.

GhostBSD 19.09 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

GhostBSD 19.09 has some considerable changes happened, like moving the system to STABLE instead of CURRENT for ABI stability with the integration of the latest system update developed by TrueOS. This also means that current users will need to reinstall GhostBSD unless they were running on the development version of GhostBSD 19.09. GhostBSD 19.09 marks the last major changes the breaks updates for software and system upgrade.

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OpenBSD on Tuxedo InfinityBook 14" v2

Filed under
BSD

The InfinityBook 14” v2 is a fanless 14” notebook. It is an excellent choice for running OpenBSD - but order it with the supported wireless card (see below.).

I’ve set it up in a dual-boot configuration so that I can switch between Linux and OpenBSD - mainly to spot differences in the drivers. TUXEDO allows a variety of configurations through their webshop.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Bpfcc New Release

    bpfcc version 0.11.0 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and should be accessible in the repositories by now. After the 0.8.0 release, this has been the next one uploaded to Debian.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: Joining Debian LTS!

    Back during the good days of DebConf19, I finally got a chance to meet Holger! As amazing and inspiring a person he is, it was an absolute pleasure meeting him and also, I got a chance to talk about Debian LTS in more detail. [...] I had almost no idea what to do next, so the next month I stayed silent, observing the workflow as people kept committing and announcing updates. And finally in September, I started triaging and fixing the CVEs for Jessie and Stretch (mostly the former). Thanks to Abhijith who explained the basics of what DLA is and how do we go about fixing bugs and then announcing them. With that, I could fix a couple of CVEs and thanks to Holger (again) for reviewing and sponsoring the uploads! :D

  • Ubucon Europe 2019 in local media

    News from the new Ubuntu distribution, the exploration of the several platforms and many “how to”, rule the 4-days agenda where the open source and open technologies are in the air. The Olga Cadaval Cultural centre in Sintra, is the main stage of a busy agenda filled with several talks and more technical sessions, but at Ubucon Europe there’s also room for networking and cultural visits, a curious fusion between spaces full of history, like the Pena Palace or the Quinta da Regaleira, and one of the youngest “players” in the world of software. For 4 days, the international Ubuntu Community gathers in Sintra for an event open to everyone, where the open source principles and open technology are dominating. The Ubucon Europe Conference begun Thursday, October 10th, and extends until Sunday, October 13th, keeping an open doors policy to everyone who wants to Afterall, what is the importance of Ubucon? The number of participants, which should be around 150, doesn’t tell the whole story of what you can learn during these days, as the SAPO TEK had the opportunity to check this morning. Organised by the Ubuntu Portugal Community, with the National Association for Open Software, the Ubuntu Europe Federation and the Sintra Municipality, the conference brings to Portugal some of the biggest open source specialists and shows that Ubuntu is indeed alive, even if not yet known by most people, and still far from the “world domain” aspired by some.

Devices/Embedded: Win Enterprises and Raspberry Pi 4

  • Win Enterprises unveils Atom-based LAN gateway and compact SBC

    Win Enterprises unveiled a fanless “PL-82000” networking gateway with 6x GbE and 2x SFP ports based on an Atom C3000. It also launched a Raspberry Pi sized “MB-5000” SBC that runs Ubuntu or Win 10 on Intel Apollo Lake. We tend to forget Win Enterprises because as its name suggests, the company typically sticks to Windows-supported products. Yet, they have increasingly produced barebones products without listed OS support, such as the new PL-82000 networking appliance, as well as Linux supported systems such as the MB-5000 SBC announced back in June. (In 2017, we covered an Intel Bay Trail based MB-80580 SBC and Win IoT-380 Gateway with Linux support.)

  • Raspberry Pi 4 PCI Express: It actually works! USB3, SATA… GPUs?

    Recently, Tomasz Mloduchowski posted a popular article on his blog detailing the steps he undertook to get access to the hidden PCIe interface of Raspberry Pi 4: the first Raspberry Pi to include PCIe in its design. After seeing his post, and realizing I was meaning to go buy a Raspberry Pi 4, it just seemed natural to try and replicate his results in the hope of taking it a bit further. I am known for Raspberry Pi Butchery, after all.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 B+ - PCI Express

    Why did I do it? Because I wanted to see if it can be done. Because Raspberry Pi 4 might be the cheapest device that is PCIe capable after a relatively minor modification (if I didn't lift the capacitors when desoldering the VL805, this is literally 12 soldering points). That, in turn, can be quite handy for developing own PCIe cores for various FPGA based experiments.

    I'm sharing it to allow people to learn from this - and to dispel the myth that PCIe is somehow out of reach of hobbyists due to some concerns over signal integrity or complexities. Stay tuned for more Pi4/PCIe experimentation!

OSS: Odoo, WordPress, MongoDB vs. MySQL

  • What's New in Odoo 13?

    Fast, Simple and Effective Business Management- this is the motto of Odoo, the leading open source ERP of the globe. And this is what makes Odoo the prominent and most favorite choice among business enterprises. With the release of Odoo 13, the open-source ERP has become all more fit and robust to meet the diversified needs of businesses. With Odoo 13 users can go along with better designs and customizations. With each version release, Odoo makes it a point to bring in major and minor improvements in the application, alongside a set of new features for improving the user interface and functionality of the user. The users worth 3.4 million is the evidence of Odoo being the finest application for business management.

  • Becoming Better Digital Citizens Through Open Source

    The WordPress Project is on a mission to democratize publishing. As WordPress empowers more people to participate in the digital space, we have the opportunity to make sure that everyone can participate safely and responsibly. Today marks the start of Digital Citizenship Week. We are going to share how open source can be used as a tool for learners (regardless of age) to practice and model the essential parts of being a good digital citizen. [...] Digital Citizenship is for all age groups. Anyone who uses the internet on a computer, mobile device or a TV is a digital citizen. You don’t have to be tech-savvy already, maybe you are taking your first steps with technology. Digital Citizenship Week is a chance to reflect together on our impact on the digital world. It can help us to make our consumption more considered and our interaction friendlier. It enables us to make a positive difference to those around us. All of us can strive (or learn) to become better digital citizens. It can be affected by the access those teaching have had to digital skills and good practice. Adult education classes and community tech hubs play a part in basic tech skill development. Unfortunately, these are not always accessible to those in less populated geographic locations.  Open source communities like WordPress already make a difference in encouraging the principles of digital citizenship, from sharing tech skills to improving security knowledge. They give people an opportunity to learn alongside their peers and many of the resources are available regardless of location, resources, or skills.

  • MongoDB vs. MySQL: How to choose

    During the dot-com bubble in the 1990s, one common software stack for web applications was LAMP, which originally stood for Linux (OS), Apache (web server), MySQL (relational database), and PHP (server programming language). MySQL was the preferred database mostly because it was free open source and had good read performance, which fit well with “Web 2.0” apps that dynamically generated sites from the database. Later the MEAN stack, which stood for MongoDB (document database), Express (web server), AngularJS (front-end framework), and Node.js (back-end JavaScript runtime), came to prominence. The MEAN stack was attractive, among other reasons, because the only language you needed to know was JavaScript. It also needed less RAM than an equivalent LAMP stack.

Security: XML External Entity (XXE) Example and the Latest Patches

  • XML External Entity (XXE) Example

    According to OWASP, an XML External Entity attack is a type of attack against an application that parses XML input. This attack occurs when XML input containing a reference to an external entity is processed by a weakly configured XML parser. This attack may lead to the disclosure of confidential data, denial of service, server side request forgery, port scanning from the perspective of the machine where the parser is located, and other system impacts. If a parser accepts unsanitized XML, we can take advantage of that and send our own crafted external XML payload to exploit our target. This post won’t be long so let’s get into it.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, sdl, and unbound), Debian (clamav, libdatetime-timezone-perl, openssl, tcpdump, and tzdata), Fedora (cutter-re, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, jackson-parent, libapreq2, ming, opendmarc, radare2, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), and SUSE (axis, jakarta-commons-fileupload, kernel, sles12sp3-docker-image, sles12sp4-image, system-user-root, and webkit2gtk3).