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BSD

Nextcloud, iXsystems tie up to offer Hub features on TrueNAS systems

Filed under
Server
BSD
  • Nextcloud, iXsystems tie up to offer Hub features on TrueNAS systems

    Open-source file syncing and sharing software company Nextcloud has announced a partnership with open storage systems developer iXsystems to bring all Nextcloud Hub features to TrueNAS systems.

    iXsystems sells high-availability storage with servers running open source solutions like FreeNAS, FreeBSD, OpenZFS, and TrueNAS, all based on the ZFS filesystem.

    In a statement, Nextcloud founder and chief executive Frank Karlitschek said: "As self-funded companies that share a strong open-source philosophy, Nextcloud and TrueNAS are natural partners.

    “Our mutual customers will benefit from an open and flexible platform with strong enterprise support capable of delivering efficient collaboration at any scale.”

  • Nextcloud and TrueNAS Deliver Productivity and Privacy

    Nextcloud GmbH, the company behind the worlds' most deployed on-premises content collaboration platform, and iXsystems inc., developers of the industry’s number one Open Storage platform, announce a partnership to bring the full suite of Nextcloud Hub features to TrueNAS. Tens of thousands of TrueNAS systems already run Nextcloud and availability of a supported, well integrated offering will give larger organizations more confidence to deploy.

GhostBSD 21.10.16 ISO is now available

Filed under
BSD

Removed all code related to startx fixes VirtualBox boot

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OpenBSD 7.0

Filed under
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 7.0. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 7.0.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD 7.0 Released With RISC-V 64-bit Port, Better Apple Silicon Support

DragonFly 6.0.1 released

Filed under
BSD

DragonFly version 6.0 has been released. DragonFly version 6.0 brings a revamped VFS caching system, significant dsynth updates, various filesystem updates including HAMMER2, and a long list of userland updates. 6.0.1 brings a Let's Encrypt certificate fix for dport installation, plus other minor fixes

Read more

Also: DragonFlyBSD 6.0.1 Released With AMD Zen 3 Temperature Monitoring, Fixes - Phoronix

MidnightBSD: A BSD-Based Alternative to the Linux Desktop

Filed under
BSD

The BSD community is making notable progress by bringing new OSes to the table. Check out MidnightBSD, a suitable alternative to the Linux desktop.

While desktop Linux has a dedicated following, most people think of the BSD family as better for servers, if they think of BSD at all. MidnightBSD is a spin on FreeBSD, attempting to create a BSD system for the desktop.

Let's take a look at MidnightBSD and its features, and discuss whether or not it is a suitable alternative to the Linux desktop.

Read more

Lumina Desktop 1.6.1

Filed under
BSD

  • Lumina Desktop 1.6.1 Release

    After a year and a half lull in development has been , the published release of the desktop environment Lumina 1.6.1 , developed after the termination of TrueOS development within the project Trident (Void Linux desktop distribution). The environment components are written using the Qt5 library (without using QML). Lumina takes a classic approach to organizing user environments. It includes a desktop, an application bar, a session manager, an application menu, a system for configuring environment settings, a task manager, a system tray, a virtual desktop system. The project code is written in C ++ and is distributed under the BSD license.

    Fluxbox is used as a window manager. The project is also developing its own file manager Insight, which has such capabilities as support for tabs for working with multiple directories at the same time, accumulation of links to selected directories in the bookmarks section, the presence of a built-in multimedia player and a photo viewer with support for slideshows, tools for managing ZFS snapshots, support for connecting external plug-in handlers.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.6.1 Released With Theme Improvements While Bigger Improvements Planned - Phoronix

    The Lumina Desktop Environment as the BSD-3 licensed desktop originally spearheaded for TrueOS/PC-BSD but found supported as well by other BSDs and Linux distributions is out with a rare new release. 

    Lumina Desktop 1.6 as the last major release came back in January 2020 while this weekend brought Lumina Desktop 1.6.1. Lumina Desktop 1.6.1 is a very minor update with various bug fixes plus also incorporating downstream theme work to the desktop. 

FreeBSD-based helloSystem 0.6.0 Released. This is What's New

Filed under
BSD

A new release of FreeBSD-based helloSystem 0.6.0 is here with important updates and bug fixes. We round up the release in this post.
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helloSystem 0.6 Released For macOS-Inspired FreeBSD

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BSD

Version 0.6 of helloSystem is now available as the FreeBSD-based open-source operating system project taking design cues from Apple's macOS.

helloSystem 0.6 brings improvements to window management, new window animations, Filer file manager enhancements, and a wide range of other desktop refinements and bugs have been fixed. HelloSystem 0.6 also marks the point in switching from the Openbox window manager over to KDE's KWin window manager.

Read more

On blood-lines, forks and survivors

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
BSD

GNU/Linux, which is not a direct descendant of the original bits of either AT&T or BSD, and thus not heir to the title of UNIX in the eyes of some purists, ironically brought UNIX to the masses in ways that the more pure-breeds could not. Capitalizing on the confusion created by the AT&T / BSD battles, Linux set its sights on world domination (albeit unwittingly), and the rest as they say is mostly history.

Today, GNU/Linux leads the pack among the Open Source UNIX variants that are active today (such as FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD). The commercial variants, still alive in data centers, continue to be pushed by big-name vendors, despite being caught in a death spiral and struggling to stay afloat in the face of the penguin tsunami. The once inimitable SunOS/Solaris fizzled away without even a proper goodbye, but continue to live on in Illumos and OpenIndiana, a shell of its former self.

And so it comes down to a handful. On the one hand, GNU/Linux, the irreverent and bastard poster-child that continues to evolve at break-neck speed, and the Right Honourable BSDs that continue to keep the original philosophy alive in its purest form and fighting valiantly into the next decade and into the twilight of most of its developer and user base.

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OpenSSH 8.8

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • [openssh-unix-announce] Announce: OpenSSH 8.8 released

    A near-future release of OpenSSH will switch scp(1) from using the legacy scp/rcp protocol to using SFTP by default.

    Legacy scp/rcp performs wildcard expansion of remote filenames (e.g. "scp host:* .") through the remote shell. This has the side effect of requiring double quoting of shell meta-characters in file names included on scp(1) command-lines, otherwise they could be interpreted as shell commands on the remote side.

    This creates one area of potential incompatibility: scp(1) when using the SFTP protocol no longer requires this finicky and brittle quoting, and attempts to use it may cause transfers to fail. We consider the removal of the need for double-quoting shell characters in file names to be a benefit and do not intend to introduce bug- compatibility for legacy scp/rcp in scp(1) when using the SFTP protocol.

    Another area of potential incompatibility relates to the use of remote paths relative to other user's home directories, for example - "scp host:~user/file /tmp". The SFTP protocol has no native way to expand a ~user path. However, sftp-server(8) in OpenSSH 8.7 and later support a protocol extension "expand-path at openssh.com" to support this.

  • OpenSSH 8.8

    sshd(8) from OpenSSH 6.2 through 8.7 failed to correctly initialise supplemental groups when executing an AuthorizedKeysCommand or AuthorizedPrincipalsCommand, where a AuthorizedKeysCommandUser or AuthorizedPrincipalsCommandUser directive has been set to run the command as a different user. Instead these commands would inherit the groups that sshd(8) was started with.

    Depending on system configuration, inherited groups may allow AuthorizedKeysCommand/AuthorizedPrincipalsCommand helper programs to gain unintended privilege.

    Neither AuthorizedKeysCommand nor AuthorizedPrincipalsCommand are enabled by default in sshd_config(5).

  • OpenSSH 8.8 release disabling rsa-sha digital signature support

    Published the release of OpenSSH 8.8, an open client and server implementation for the SSH 2.0 and SFTP protocols. The release is notable for disabling by default the ability to use digital signatures based on RSA keys with a SHA-1 hash (“ssh-rsa”).

    The end of support for “ssh-rsa” signatures is due to an increase in the effectiveness of collision attacks with a given prefix (the cost of collision guessing is estimated at about 50 thousand dollars). To test the use of ssh-rsa on your systems, you can try connecting via ssh with the “-oHostKeyAlgorithms = -ssh-rsa” option. Support for RSA signatures with SHA-256 and SHA-512 (rsa-sha2-256 / 512) hashes, which are supported since OpenSSH 7.2, is unchanged.

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More in Tux Machines

Pumpkins, markets, and one bad Apple

Imagine your local farmers market: every Saturday the whole town comes together to purchase fresh and homemade goods, enjoy the entertainment, and find that there is always something for everyone. Whatever you need, you can find it here, and anyone can sign up to have their own little stand. It is a wonderful place, or so it seems. Now, imagine starting out as a pumpkin farmer, and you want to sell your pumpkins at this market. The market owner asks 30% of every pumpkin that you sell. It's steep, but the market owner -- we'll call him Mr. Apple -- owns all the markets in your area, so you have little choice. Let's continue this analogy and imagine that, since it is a little hard for you to make ends meet, you decide to tell your customers that they can come visit you at your farm to purchase pumpkins. Mr. Apple overhears and shuts your stand down. You explain that your business cannot be profitable this way, but the grumpy market owner says that you can either comply or find another place. At the end of your rope, you look for information about starting your own farmers market, but it seems Mr. Apple owns every building in town. In the midst of Apple announcing its new products, attention is drawn away from its ongoing battle to maintain its subjugation over users globally. The Netherlands’ Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) last month informed the U.S. technology giant of its decision that the rules around the in-app payment system are anticompetitive, making it the first antitrust regulator to conclude that the company has abused market power in the App Store. And while Apple is appealing this verdict, the European Union is charging the company with another antitrust claim concerning the App Store. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 - howtodojo

    In this tutorial, we learn how to install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). PostgreSQL, or usually called Postgres, is an open-source object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) with an emphasis on extensibility and standards compliance. PostgreSQL is ACID-compliant and transactional. It is developed by PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) that consists of many companies and individual contributors. PostgreSQL released under the terms of PostgreSQL license.

  • How to Install Minikube on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Minikube is open source software for setting up a single-node Kubernetes cluster on your local machine. The software starts up a virtual machine and runs a Kubernetes cluster inside of it, allowing you to test in a Kubernetes environment locally. Minikube is a tool that runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster in a virtual machine on your laptop. In this tutorial we will show you how to install Minikube on CentOS 8.

  • How to Install and Secure Redis on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    Redis (short for Remote Dictionary Server), is an open-source in-memory data structure store. It’s used as a flexible, highly available key-value database that maintains a high level of performance. It helps to reduce time delays and increase the performance of your application by accessing in microseconds.

  • How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 - OMG! Ubuntu!

    If the glowing reviews for the Ubuntu 21.10 release have you intrigued, here’s how to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 from an earlier version. Fair warning: this tutorial is super straightforward (the benefits of upgrading after a stable release, rather than a little bit before). Meaning no, you don’t need to be a Linux guru to get going! There are plenty of good reasons to upgrade from Ubuntu 21.04 to Ubuntu 21.10, such as benefiting from a newer Linux kernel, enjoying a new GNOME desktop, sampling the new Yaru Light theme, and getting to go hands-on with an able assortment of updated apps.

  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4. Enjoy!

  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add a JDK version to Jenkins. If you plan to run a Java build requiring a specific version of the Java Development Kit, you need to do this.

  • Sending EmailsSend them from Linux Terminal? | Linux Journal

    Does your job require sending a lot of emails on a daily basis? And you often wonder if or how you can send email messages from the Linux terminal. This article explains about 6 different ways of sending emails using the Linux terminal. Let’s go through them.

Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.