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GNOME 3.32 Arrives in Month’s First Tumbleweed Snapshot

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GNOME
SUSE

This month has produced a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot thus far and GNOME 3.32.1 was made available to Tumbleweed users in snapshot 20190505. The key packages that arrive so far this month are a newer Linux Kernel, a minor update for python-setuptools and the text editor GNU Nano fixed the spell checker from crashing.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190507, which delivered nano 4.2, had a large update of changes for ghostscript 9.27; the versatile processor for PostScript data extensively cleaned up the Postscript name space and will now focus on the next releases to make SAFER the default mode of operation. The Optimized inner loop Runtime Compiler, orc 0.4.29, added decorator command line argument to add function decorators in header files. The latest python-setuptools 41.0.1 version fixed issues with the PEP 517, which specifies a standard API for systems which build Python packages. Text editor vim 8.1.1282 was also released in the snapshot. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Mozilla Firefox 66.0.4 fixed extension certificate chain in snapshot 20190506. There was an improvement to network status detection with Network Manager with the glib2 2.60.2 update. The asn1c-based parser was replaced by an openssl-based PKCS parser with the kmod 26 package. The openblas_pthreads 0.3.6 had some changes for POWER6, PowerPC 970 and ARMv7 and ARMv8. The 1.28 perl-YAML package offered a security fix and xfsprogs updated to the 5.0.0 version from 4.20.0. The snapshot is currently trending stable at a 92 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Also: EasyTAG: Organize your music with openSUSE

Leap 15.1, the release that nobody talks about

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SUSE

KDE applications got a big update to 18.12. Dolphin (file manager) received many improvements, including the ability to hide the Places panel and dock the Terminal panel. The folder view and settings dialog have been updated. Ocular (PDF and document viewer) has a new typewriter annotation feature that enables you to type everywhere on a page. Konsole (terminal application) now has full support for emoji. The Gwenview (image viewer) has seen many improvements, including the crop tool, the reduce red eye tool, improved zooming and better drag and drop functionality. Spectacle (screenshot tool) gained the ability to sequentially number screenshot files and now remembers the lastest save settings. With the rectangular region selection mode, you can select a part of the screen . Ark (unzip tool) now supports the tar.zst archive file standard.

Krita is updated to 4.1.8 and introduces the new reference images tool that lets you place and edit a reference image to help you with drawing. Another help with drawing is provided by the improved vanishing point assistant. Krita 4.1 features many animation improvements and a better color picker tool.

LibreOffice 6.1 offers 2 new icon themes ‘Colibre’ and ‘Karasa Jaga’, it loads documents with many images faster, the gradient tool has been improved and new fill gradients are available, you can now add page numbers and page counts in the header and footer sections of Writer, you can insert a Signature line in Writer, you can now sort images anchored to cells in Calc, the merge cells dialog box has become much clearer in Calc, you can now use CSVs as data sources in Calc and a new page menu has been added in Impress.

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OpenSUSE/SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

    The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

  • SUSE’s Embrace Of OpenStack Airship | Matthew Johns Interview

    In this interview, Matthew Johns – Global Product and Solutions Marketing Manager at SUSE talks about OpenStack Airship and why SUSE is embracing the project. We also talked about the evolution of the OpenStack Project itself.

    Airship, a collection of loosely coupled but interoperable open source tools that declaratively automate cloud provisioning, is available in its first release today. Airship 1.0 delivers a wide range of enhancements to security, resiliency, continuous integration and documentation, as well as upgrades to the platform, deployment and tooling features.

  • Going to @SAPPHIRENOW 2019? Don’t miss out visiting SUSE Booth #2246
  • 40+ sessions you shouldn’t miss at SAPPHIRE NOW 2019 [Ed: It's almost as if SAP owns SUSE now. Every single day there's a SAP puff piece in SUSE's official blog, today even two.]
  • New energy at SUSE's annual SUSECON conference

    The SUSE community pondered new challenges and the path ahead at its annual SUSECON convention in Nashville, Tennessee.

    The past 12 months have been a whirlwind of change for SUSE. Former parent company Micro Focus announced last July that it was spinning off SUSE as an independent company [1], and since then, the leading European enterprise Linux vendor has been in a flurry of reinvention. In addition to embracing a new emphasis on growth, SUSE is also finding its way through the changes in the Linux space following IBM's acquisition of Red Hat.

A Conversation with Kernel Developers from Intel, Red Hat and SUSE

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Linux
Red Hat
Interviews
SUSE

Like most Linux users, I rarely touch the actual code for the Linux kernel. Sure, I've looked at it. I've even compiled the kernel myself on a handful of occasions—sometimes to try out something new or simply to say I could do it ("Linux From Scratch" is a bit of a right of passage).

But, unless you're one of the Linux kernel developers, odds are you just don't get many opportunities to truly look "under the hood".

Likewise, I think for many Linux users (even the pro users, sysadmins and developers), the wild world of kernel development is a bit of a mystery. Sure, we have the publicly available Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML.org) that anyone is free to peruse for the latest features, discussions and (sometimes) shenanigans, but that gives only a glimpse at one aspect of being a kernel developer.

And, let's be honest, most of us simply don't have time to sift through the countless pull requests (and resulting discussions of said pull requests) that flood the LKML on a daily basis.

With that in mind, I reached out to three kernel developers—each working at some of the most prominent Linux contributing companies today—to ask them some basic questions that might provide a better idea of what being a Linux kernel developer is truly like: what their days look like and how they work with kernel developers at other companies.

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Also: Zack's Kernel News

Latest From openSUSE and SUSE

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SUSE

New KDE Frameworks, Python Setuptools, Emacs Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

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SUSE

The more recent Tumbleweed snapshot 20190423, provided new cups-filters 1.22.5 that changed a Ghostscript call so that fixes the page count so that it works with Ghostscript 9.27 and later. AV1 decoder package dav1d 0.2.2 brings a speed increase between four and six percent for Multi Slot Amplitude Coding (MSAC) decoding with SSE. The kernel-firmware package was updated to 20190409 and updated the firmware file for Intel Bluetooth and Marvell firmware images. Indonesian translations were made to the libstorage-ng 4.1.112 package. Ruby 2.6.3 updated the Unicode version to 12.1 beta to adds support for New Japanese Era “令和” (Reiwa). Other packages updated in the snapshot were perl-DateTime 1.51 and perl-DateTime-TimeZone 2.35, python-parso 0.4.0, python-qt5 5.12.1 and rdma-core 23.0. This snapshot is currently trending at a 89 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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More SUSE: Trusted, open innovation that matters for SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems

SUSE: Open Infrastructure Summit, Cloud Foundry Summit and Microsoft 'Ads'

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SUSE
  • On Cloud Nine in Denver

    Next week, members of the open source community will descend upon Denver in hordes unseen since the gold rush that resulted in the city being formed back in the late 1800’s (probably). That’s right, it’s the very first Open Infrastructure Summit – bringing together some of the finest minds across the open source community to discuss, demo and deliberate all things OpenStack, Kubernetes, ONAP, Kata Containers, Airship, Zuul, and much, much more.
    We’re particularly excited about this summit as we’ll be unveiling SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 to the world there, having pre-announced it earlier in the month at SUSECON in Nashville. As the first company to produce an enterprise-ready OpenStack distribution back in 2012, we continue to work to make OpenStack easier for companies to implement in an enterprise environment, giving a stable, production-ready base for business-critical systems and applications to run on.

  • Eirini and CF Containerization: a field guide

    The recent Cloud Foundry Summit in Philadelphia featured two talks that were crucial to understanding the future of Cloud Foundry as it relates to Kubernetes.

    [...]

    But there’s another problem. In talking to people in the hallways and at the SUSE booth, we found that there was considerable confusion about what the Eirini and CF Containerization projects were responsible for. Specifically, many people thought that Eirini was the project for containerizing the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime.

  • SQL Server on SUSE Linux from A-Z: Data platform, High Availability and Containers [Ed: SUSE is advertising proprietary software from Microsoft]

Server: Cloudwashing by SUSE and Openwashing by Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Why Hybrid Cloud is About to Get a Whole Lot Easier

    It seems like analysts, vendors and IT decision makers have been talking about “hybrid cloud” for the longest time. The concept has been around for at least a decade – and that’s a really long time in the IT industry. Is it still important? Absolutely.
    Almost every piece of cloud market research I read shows the majority of enterprises are focusing on a hybrid cloud strategy. Why? Because they all need increased agility, innovation and productivity, better cost optimization and improved customer experience.

  • The Open Organization guide to Red Hat Summit 2019 [Ed: The 'Open Organization' slant in Red Hat Summit 2019 with Microsoft CEO as keynote because it's all about money, not "open" or "free" (just proprietary and expensive]

    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst published The Open Organization in 2015, he didn't just release a book. He catalyzed a global conversation about the ways open principles are reshaping organizational culture and design.

  • Developing distributed applications and services for tomorrow: a proof of concept

    Innovation is accelerating across the automobile industry, bringing advances in the in-vehicle experience. Connected vehicle technologies are opening up new business models and providing a whole range of new software and data-driven services.

    When it comes to new software and data-driven services, the possibilities are immense. But there is one trend many use cases have in common: they are becoming more distributed. To provide a great user experience, connected in-vehicle services often need to integrate increasingly diverse data.

SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Two New Open Source Projects From SAP: Dan Lahl

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, Daniel Lahl, Vice President (Product Marketing) – SAP talks about the two new Open Source projects at SAP.

  • A Special Offer for SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems Early Adopters

    In my blog, “Is time running out for your SAP Linux support?”, I talked about SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 11 SP4 soon reaching its March 31, 2019 end date for General Support. This date has passed. To maintain support you have a choice of either upgrading to a currently supported version or adding Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS). But if you’re an early adopter of SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems, then it’s not just a matter of upgrading the Linux OS. You need to migrate your data from Big Endian to Little Endian format. Also, your data is still probably in an SAP HANA 1.0 database so you’ll also need to migrate to SAP HANA 2.0. All of this can take significant time and effort.

  • Rounding out the list of Red Hat Summit keynotes [Ed: A summit led by Microsoft CEO's (first in the list); Red Hat sold out.]

    For the last few months, we’ve been sharing the exciting and thought-provoking keynotes that you can look forward to at Red Hat Summit 2019. From hybrid cloud, containers and cloud-native app platforms to management, automation and more, customers, partners and technology industry leaders from around the world will come together for a high-energy week of innovation, education and collaboration.

    In our 14th year, we’re bringing you inspirational, educational and actionable content, industry-shaping news, and innovative practices from customers and partners from across industries. With just fours week to go, we’re proud to announce the last round of partners and customers who will be taking the stage in Boston, May 7-9.

  • Leadership of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 Transitions to Red Hat

    OpenJDK is an open source implementation of Java, one of the most widely-used programming languages for building enterprise-grade applications. In its role as steward of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 update releases, Red Hat will work with the community to enable continued innovation in Java.

    Red Hat has been a member of the OpenJDK community since 2007 and is one of the largest contributors to the project. Red Hat’s long-time Java technical lead, Andrew Haley, was appointed as project lead for OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 in February 2019. He has been an active member of the OpenJDK governing board for seven years and, in this capacity, helps to guide the future direction of Java and OpenJDK.

    In addition to its work within individual OpenJDK communities, Red Hat leads the upstream development of Shenandoah, a high-performance garbage collector that is now part of OpenJDK 12.

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • The introvert’s guide to Red Hat Summit

    Events like Red Hat Summit fill me with excitement and, admittedly, a bit of trepidation. Thousands of people, a schedule packed with informative and useful sessions, and opportunities to meet and talk with folks doing exciting work in open source sounds great. It also, well, sounds a bit exhausting if you’re an introvert. It doesn’t have to be, though, and Red Hat wants everyone to feel welcome, comfortable, and able to fully enjoy the event. With that in mind, read on for some strategies and resources for success.

    Introverts aren’t (necessarily) misanthropes, we just tend to like smaller gatherings and less noisy and intense social situations. Even those can be fun, in limited doses. The thing about a large conference like Red Hat Summit, though, is that it’s a huge helping of people and activities turned up to 11. Don’t worry, you can still go and have a great experience, it just takes a little bit of planning.

  • Kubernetes Cluster vs Master Node

    In Software engineering, a cluster resembles a group of nodes that work together to distribute the work load. Additionally clustering helps in fault tolerance, by having a cluster acting as a secondary (backup) to a primary cluster.

  • The Bright (green) Lights of Denver

    You may have read some of the release notes or press coverage from the recent release of OpenStack Stein, in which case you’ll know that Stein introduced multi-factor authentication receipts for Keystone. This really just completes the work that was originally begun in the Ocata release, making it easier to implement a challenge/response mechanism in your OpenStack environment. Multi-factor authentication is quickly becoming the norm in everything from free online email services, to social media sites and more – catching up with the security that most, if not all online banking services have been offering for some time now.

  • How Big is a Container, Really?

    One of the first questions in any discussion about cluster sizing tends to be “How many containers are you running?”. While this is a good data point (especially if you are pushing the scheduler to its limit) it doesn’t show the whole story.
    We tend to abstract out a container as this homogeneous building block that represents any workload.

    This abstraction has a lot of value for learning how containers work and how the system treats all workloads similarly (which is hugely valuable). However, it falls down when we start looking at planning our hardware requirements.

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