Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

SUSE Promoting Events and Proprietary Software

Filed under
SUSE

Return of the Rodents: Xfce is back in openSUSE Tumbleweed Installer

Filed under
SUSE

We are very pleased to announce that installing the lightweight and slim desktop environment Xfce in openSUSE Tumbleweed just got faster and hassle-free!

Along with GNOME and KDE Plasma, Xfce can now be conveniently selected from the installer’s main screen, as your desktop environment from both DVD installer and net installer. All this is combined with a carefully picked selection of packages that rounds off our offered system to get you started quickly and easily.

Our Xfce team has invested a lot of work in the past months to optimize the “cute mouse” by focusing on the desktop and the underlying rolling release of Tumbleweed. It features applications that better suit the desktop, as well as new modern themes that make the default experience refreshing and enjoyable.

Read more

BSD, GNU and SUSE Events

Filed under
GNU
OSS
SUSE
BSD
  • t2k19 Hackathon Report: Ken Westerback on dhclient, disklabel, and more
  • Purism at LibrePlanet 2019 – Showcasing the Librem 5 Phone

    This year’s edition of LibrePlanet went on so well, we had people stopping by to ask questions before the conference was open for the day.

    Purism’s booth was busy, and people were happy to see us. Nearly everyone we talked to had been following our progress, and everyone was excited to see things in-person. We showcased the fourth version of Librem laptops, and made regular demonstrations of both PureBoot on a Librem 13v4 and Librem Key. Above all, we drew a lot of excitement around the in-person viewing of the Librem 5 devkit. So much excitement, we really wanted to write about the commotion caused by the Librem 5 development – and specially about the devkit demonstration – not only among the audience but also within our own team members.

    The Librem 5 phone may still be months away from delivery, but the Librem 5 devkit is under very rapid development. Showcasing our progress is something we’re very proud of, so at the first day of LibrePlanet we whet the appetite of audience members by showcasing sub ten-second boot times from powered-off state to unlock-screen… and we also showed off the initial application support of calling, settings, chat/sms, and browser.

  • SUSECON – Cloud Talkin’

    With over 1,000 attendees from 45 different countries, SUSECON was a truly global affair with a uniquely country twist.

OpenSUSE and SUSE Videos From Swapnil Bhartiya of TFIR

Filed under
SUSE
  • Why You Should Attend OpenSUSE Conference

    The openSUSE Conference begins Friday, May 24, at 10 a.m. and will finish on Sunday, May 26. The openSUSE Conference is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from around the world together to meet and collaborate. The organized talks, workshops, and BoF sessions provide a framework around more casual meet ups and hack sessions. A party here and there provides the time to relax and have fun, making connections on a more personal level.

  • SUSE CTO of Americas talks about container adoption

    In this interview Brent Schroeder - Americas' CTO of SUSE talks about some trends he has noticed in the industry.

  • Thomas Di Giacomo Interview at SUSECON

    In this interview Thomas Di Giacomo of SUSE and Swapnil Bhartiya of TFIR discussed a wide range of topics including the new role of Di Giacomo, what happened to SUSE' CTO office; how digital transformation is a misleading term and games. Yes. Games!

  • Exclusive Interview with SUSE CEO, Nils Brauckmann
  • Nils Brauckmann Talks about the evolution of SUSE

    SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann discusses the evolution of SUSE under his leadership. If you like our coverage, you can become

Red Hat and SUSE on CRI-O

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Red Hat contributes CRI-O to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today CRI-O, a project started at Red Hat in 2016 to be an Open Container Initiative-based implementation of the Kubernetes Container Runtime Interface, is being contributed to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). This project joins cornerstone containers and Kubernetes projects we’ve been a part of like etcd and others to join a neutral home for stewardship.

    This is a step forward for the containers and CRI-O community because it brings the project into the same home as Kubernetes, which benefits users given its close interdependency. CRI-O and Kubernetes follow the same release cycle and deprecation policy.

    CRI-O already has a variety of maintainers outside of Red Hat including Intel and SUSE. Red Hat plans to continue participating in developing CRI-O, especially as a part of our enterprise Kubernetes product, Red Hat OpenShift. With our heritage and dedication to open source software and community-driven development, CRI-O can benefit the community even further within CNCF housed next to Kubernetes.

  • Welcome to the CNCF, CRI-O!

    CRI-O, the Open Container Initiative (OCI) implementation of the Kubernetes Container Runtime Interface (CRI), will join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) incubator today. The project provides an alternative container runtime for Kubernetes and was founded back in 2016 (originally known as OCID) with the introduction of the Kubernetes CRI. CRI-O focuses on its first principles of stability and reliability. This has been proven since one and a half year for now and CRI-O synchronizes its releases with Kubernetes to ensure these principles for the future, too. The projects popularity raised over the past years that it is now the best solution to run Kubernetes workloads in a secure fashion. Currently, CRI-O has worldwide 106 contributors and 9 maintainers coming from Intel, Red Hat, and SUSE. SUSE CaaS Platform version 3 provides it as a technology preview, where CRI-O can be chosen during the installation. No further workload changes are needed to switch from Docker or containerd to CRI-O.

SUSE: SUSECON, 'Cloud' and Microsoft/HANA/SAP

Filed under
SUSE
  • Brauckmann upbeat at first SUSECON since independence

    SUSECON 2019 opens in Nashville, TN as CEO Nils Brauckmann lays out his vision for growth and the future in front of over 1000 attendees.

  • SUSE: A new mantra from edge to core to cloud

    Enterprise Linux company SUSE loves Linux, obviously.

    As Linux lives so prevalently and prolifically in the server rooms of so many cloud datacentres, the firm has worked to develop technologies designed to help those datacentres become software-defined.

    A software-defined datacentre being one that relies upon programmable elements of code that control, shape and manage many of the network actions that we might (perhaps 10-years ago, certainly 20-years ago) have relied upon dedicated highly specialised hardware for.

  • SUSE eyes wider horizons for enterprise open source

    The Computer Weekly Developer Network and Open Source Insider team is digging into four days of open source goodness at SUSECON.

    SUSE these days describes itself as a provider of enterprise-grade open source software-defined infrastructure and a set of application delivery tools.

    As SUSE regional director for EMEA West region Matt Eckersall has already told Computer Weekly, SUSECON is not just dedicated to SUSE enterprise-class Linux, the event also opens its focus to OpenStack, Ceph storage, Kubernetes, openATTIC, Cloud Foundry plus a range of other open source (and some proprietary) projects.

  • SUSE delivers first Linux image for SAP Hana large instances on Azure [Ed: SUSE proudly delivers proprietary software on an NSA surveillance platform maintained by Microsoft. SUSE refuses to evolve.]
  • Hitting Microsoft's metal: SUSE flings Enterprise Linux at SAP HANA on Azure [Ed: SUSE is still working for Microsoft (even after the Novell sellout of 2006)]

    SUSE modestly considers itself to be the "leading Linux platform" for SAP HANA and, while neither it nor Microsoft will be drawn on how many of the Linux instances on Azure have a green chameleon tinge to them, Daniel Nelson, vice president of Products and Solutions for SUSE, told El Reg: "We see it growing for us faster than market growth."

Events: HTTP Workshop, foss-north and SUSECON

Filed under
OSS
Web
SUSE
  • Daniel Stenberg: Workshop Season 4 Finale

    The 2019 HTTP Workshop ended today. In total over the years, we have now done 12 workshop days up to now. This day was not a full day and we spent it on only two major topics that both triggered long discussions involving large parts of the room.

    [...]

    Mike Bishop did an excellent presentation of HTTP/3 for HTTP people that possibly haven’t kept up fully with the developments in the QUIC working group. From a plain HTTP view, HTTP/3 is very similar feature-wise to HTTP/2 but of course sent over a completely different transport layer. (The HTTP/3 draft.)

    Most of the questions and discussions that followed were rather related to the transport, to QUIC. Its encryption, it being UDP, DOS prevention, it being “CPU hungry” etc. Deploying HTTP/3 might be a challenge for successful client side implementation, but that’s just nothing compared the totally new thing that will be necessary server-side. Web developers should largely not even have to care…

    One tidbit that was mentioned is that in current Firefox telemetry, it shows about 0.84% of all requests negotiates TLS 1.3 early data (with about 12.9% using TLS 1.3)

    Thought-worthy quote of the day comes from Willy: “everything is a buffer”

  • Daniel Stenberg: The HTTP Workshop 2019 begins

    35 persons from all over the world walked in the room and sat down around the O-shaped table setup. Lots of known faces and representatives from a large variety of HTTP implementations, client-side or server-side – but happily enough also a few new friends that attend their first HTTP Workshop here. The companies with the most employees present in the room include Apple, Facebook, Mozilla, Fastly, Cloudflare and Google – all with three each I believe.

    Patrick Mcmanus started off the morning with his presentation on HTTP conventional wisdoms trying to identify what have turned out as successes or not in HTTP land in recent times. It triggered a few discussions on the specific points and how to judge them. I believe the general consensus ended up mostly agreeing with the slides. The topic of unshipping HTTP/0.9 support came up but is said to not be possible due to its existing use. As a bonus, Anne van Kesteren posted a new bug on Firefox to remove it.

  • foss-north 2019 – it is happening

    This years experiments are the training day, and community day. Looking at the various RSVPs for the community day, it looks like we’ll be 130+ attendees. For the conference days we have only ten tickets left out of 240, beating last years record attendance with 90 people.

  • The Openness Continues: SUSECON Day 2 Recap

    Michael Miller then took the stage, provided an overview of the day and then welcomed Dr. Thomas Di Giacomo, President of Engineering, Product and Innovation to the stage.  But before diving into this discussion for the day, Thomas introduced a new SUSE video instructing everyone on the proper way to say “SUSE”.

SUSE Linux and enterprise Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Raspberry Pi single-board computers are wildly popular with makers, kids, and anyone who likes hands-on computing. But, in enterprise business? Industrial sites? Not so much. Or, are they? At SUSECon in Nashville, Tenn., SUSE executives revealed that three customers are already deploying SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) on Raspberry Pi computers.

To be precise, these companies are all using Raspberry Pi Compute Modules. This is a Raspberry Pi 3 in a form factor that's designed for industrial applications,

The first customer, Knorr-Bremse, is a German manufacturing company. This business has old equipment with no built-in monitoring. It's using a SLES-powered Raspberry Pi device to track what its gear is doing. Not bad for a 1.2GHz ARM BCM2837 processor with a 1GB RAM and 4GB eMMC Flash device instead of an SD card.

Read more

SUSE Server News

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE: More than Linux

    To the strains of My Kind of Open Source, SUSE wants you to know not just a Linux distributor. While SUSE will never leave its Linux roots, it offers a wide variety of open-source based programs and services for your servers, software-defined data center, the edge and cloud computing.

    At the SUSECon keynote in Nashville, Tenn., SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann emphasised SUSE would soon be the largest independent open-source company. He's saying that because, as IDC open source analyst Al Gillen noted, IBM will soon complete its acquisition of Red Hat.

  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 – coming soon!

    Here at SUSE, we’re very excited to let you know that the latest version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud is due to be released later this month. In fact, you might say that we’re on cloud 9.

  • SUSE Collaborates with Intel to Accelerate Data-Centric Transformation

Servers: SUSE and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Will Soon Be the Largest Independent Linux Company
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15 on AWS

    SUSE is excited to launch SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm on AWS, backed by a Trial Subscription Program and also available via AWS Spot Instances to get started on your next innovation. Today’s innovators are testing new architecture designs to build products in increasingly more efficient, cost-effective, scalable, and secure ways. The Arm architecture is critical in this diverse ecosystem and its’ adoption by Amazon Web Services in November 2018 was a huge milestone for the market. While Arm is prevalent in the mobile market and the chip most likely powering the device in your pocket – the technology is also critical in powering IoT devices and applications in the machine learning space.

  • What Is Kubernetes?

    Kubernetes (pronounced “CUBE-A-NET-IS”) is an open-source platform that helps manage container applications such as Docker. Whether you are looking to automate or scale these containers across multiple hosts, Kubernetes can speed up deployment. To do this it may use internal components such as Kubernetes API or third-party extensions which run on Kubernetes.

    This article will help you understand the basic concepts of Kubernetes and why it is causing such a seismic shift in the server market, with vendors as well as cloud providers, such as Azure and Google Cloud, offering Kubernetes services.

  • Kubernetes v1.14 delivers production-level support for Windows nodes and Windows containers [Ed: When Kubernetes is steered by GPL violators and proprietary software thugs from VMware and Microsoft]

    The first release of Kubernetes in 2019 brings a highly anticipated feature - production-level support for Windows workloads. Up until now Windows node support in Kubernetes has been in beta, allowing many users to experiment and see the value of Kubernetes for Windows containers. While in beta, developers in the Kubernetes community and Windows Server team worked together to improve the container runtime, build a continuous testing process, and complete features needed for a good user experience. Kubernetes now officially supports adding Windows nodes as worker nodes and scheduling Windows containers, enabling a vast ecosystem of Windows applications to leverage the power of our platform.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: Open Source Security Podcast, Screwed Drivers, and Voting Machines Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 9:45am
Story CutiePi Open Source Tablet uses Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Roy Schestowitz 2 19/08/2019 - 9:42am
Story Linux Candy: WallGen – image generator tool Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 9:39am
Story An introduction to bpftrace for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 7:30am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 7:12am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 6:29am
Story Fedora and Red Hat: New F30 Builds, Flock Report, Servers and Package Management Domain Model Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 1:25am
Story Review: AcademiX GNU/Linux 2.2 Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 1:18am
Story Security: ECB, Bluetooth and AppArmor Crash Course Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 1:04am
Story Manjaro 18.0.4 Illyria Xfce review - Nice but somewhat crude Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2019 - 1:00am