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SUSE

SUSE and Red Hat Server Software

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 Release Candidate 1 is here!
  • The New News on OpenShift 3.11

    Greetings fellow OpenShift enthusiasts! Not too long ago, Red Hat announced that OKD v3.11, the last release in the 3.x stream, is now generally available. The latest release of OpenShift enhances a number of current features that we know and love, as well as a number of interesting updates and technology previews for features that may or may not be included in OpenShift 4.0. Let’s take a look at one of the more exciting releases that may be part of The Great Updates coming in OpenShift 4.0.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.4.2 has just been released

    Red Hat Satellite 6.4.2 is now generally available. The main drivers for the 6.4.2 release are upgrade and stability fixes. Eighteen bugs have been addressed in this release - the complete list is at the end of the post. The most notable issue is support of cloning for Satellite 6.4.

    Cloning allows you to copy your Satellite installation to another host to facilitate testing or upgrading the underlying operating system. For example, when moving a Satellite installation from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. An overview of this feature is available on Red Hat’s Customer Portal.

Inkscape, GTK, glibc Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

The lone snapshot of the week was 20190209. ModemManager made the jump from version 1.6.14 to 1.10.0 and consolidated common tag names among all the supported plugins as well as provided a new tag to allow specifying flow control settings to use in serial ports. The Mozilla Thunderbird 60.5.0 package gave more search engine options in certain locations offering Google and DuckDuckGo available by default. The email client also added Thunderbird FileLink with WeTransfer to upload large attachments. Thunderbird Filelink provides support for online storage services and allows upload attachments to an online storage service and then replaces the attachment in the message with a link. General-purpose parser generator bison 3.3.1 removed support for the 32-bit C/C++ development system DJGPP. The compiler cache, ccache 3.6, which speeds up recompilation by caching previous compilations, fixed a problem due to Clang, which is a C language family frontend for LLVM, overwriting the output file when compiling an assembler file and added support for GNU Compiler Collection‘s `-ffile-prefix-map` option. The 1.12.12 version update for dbus stopped a few memory leaks and added a couple patches. The epson-inkjet-printer-escpr 1.6.35 version added support for new printer models EcoTank ET-M1100 and Epson WorkForce ST-2000. GNU C Library glibc 2.29 added getcpu wrapper function, which returns the currently used CPU and NUMA node, and optimized the generic exp, exp2, log, log2, pow, sinf, cosf, sincosf and tanf functions. Cross-platform widget toolkit gtk3 3.24.5 implement gdk_window_present for Wayland, updated translations and refreshed the theme. The health-checker 1.1 package added new plugins for cri-o and kubelet. Users of the professional-quality vector-graphics application Inkscape can now use the 0.92.4 version; the new version improves preferences of the measuring tool when grids are visible and fixes a crash that would happen when a user does a Shift/Ctrl-click when handling shapes. Tumbleweed users will have 1.7x faster performance with Ruby 2.6 as the default as compared to Ruby 2.5. Other library packages updated in the snapshot were libosinfo 1.3.0, libsodium 1.0.17, libsolv 0.7.3, libstorage-ng 4.1.86 and libzypp 17.11.1.

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Engaging the openSUSE community

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SUSE

And that the openSUSE community should have a better ‘Marketing strategy’ (for the lack of a better term) to make the Contributor Journey a smoother experience. To try to get the roadblocks out of the way for the people that want to be informed or be involved. It is an area where I could see myself contributing to in the future.

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OpenSUSE Looking At Blacklisting Legacy & Less Secure File-Systems

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SUSE

Following a move by SUSE blacklisting legacy / less-used file-systems in SUSE Linux Enterprise, OpenSUSE is looking at doing the same to blacklist the kernel modules for a number of esoteric file-systems as well as the likes of JFS and F2FS.

While users will be able to adjust their modprobe configuration files to override these kernel module blacklist entries, OpenSUSE is looking at following SLES' lead into trying to ween users off these legacy file-systems or file-systems that have history of security issues or other concerns.

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Servers: Red Hat, SUSE, and Debian

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Red Hat
Server
Debian
SUSE

Red Hat

  • BlueStore: Improved performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2

    Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2 is now available! The big news with this release is full support for the BlueStore Ceph backend, offering significantly increased performance for both object and block applications.

  • Which open source backup solution do you use?

    Even though lots of our data exists in the cloud today, you still need to protect your local files with a reliable backup solution. When I needed a new offsite backup solution for my Linux desktop files, I asked my editors and fellow Community Moderators at Opensource.com to share their recommendations. They provided some familiar and some new-to-me options.

  • From The Enterprisers Project: 9 Kubernetes Jobs Facts and Figures
  • 12 ways to get smarter about Kubernetes

    Kubernetes adoption is growing at a rapid clip, yet this is still new technology for most folks. That means that many people in IT, from the C-suite through the most junior positions, are still getting up to speed on the basics and what comes next: What is Kubernetes, what do IT teams use it for, what are the overlapping trends, what are the day-to-day realities, and so forth.

    Fortunately, many accessible resources can help you smooth out the learning curve. Below, we curate some of our favorites. The goal here isn’t to achieve deep technical expertise, but rather to help you beef up your general Kubernetes IQ.

    Doing so can help IT leaders and their teams better understand why Kubernetes has become one of the hottest open source projects around. You’ll also want to delve into its relationship with other significant trends such as containers, cloud-native development, multi-cloud, and hybrid cloud – and yes, dig into the nuts and bolts of the technology itself.

  • CYBG Supports 25x More Customer Logins on iB Digital Services Platform with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

SUSE:

  • Anyone Can Benchmark + openSUSE Challenge | Choose Linux 2

    Episode 2 is all about opposites, such as the major differences between benchmarking graphics cards like Radeon VII on Linux and Windows. Then we dive into the Phoronix Test Suite, a robust tool that isn’t just for tech reviewers. Find out why you should be using it too.

    Plus, the distro challenges roll on as Jason decides to do a complete 180, jumping from elementary OS to openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • Deliver Applications Faster – Here’s How

    Join us for an executive level overview of the path your business can take to reduce application delivery cycle times and increase business agility. We’ll discuss emerging container technologies, cloud native application architectures, DevOps processes, and ways you can use them together to effect the change you need. Discover how SUSE can help you deliver your applications faster!

  • Explore options for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 4, End-of-Life Mar 31, 2019

    General support for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 product family, including SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 11 will be ending on March 31, 2019.

Debian:

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in January 2019

    This month I accepted 363 packages, which is again more than last month. On the other side I rejected 68 uploads, which is almost twice as last month. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 494.

  • Review of Debian System Administrator’s Handbook

    Debian System Administrator’s Handbook is a free-to-download book that covers all the essential part of Debian that a sysadmin might need.

    This has been on my to-do review list for quite some time. The book was started by two French Debian Developers Raphael Hertzog and Roland Mas to increase awareness about the Debian project in France. The book was a huge hit among francophone Linux users. The English translation followed soon after that.

Major Version Updates of Bash, libvirt, OpenConnect Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Another three snapshots were released this week for openSUSE Tumbleweed bringing updates for ImageMagick, Mesa, Apache, Ceph, Flatpak Builder, Python and more. Plus, new major versions of Bash, glusterfs, libvirt and openconnect were updated this week.

The first snapshot of the week, 20190201, was a complete rebuild of the distribution and the snapshots released since have gradually improved in quality, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The most recent snapshot, 20190205, brought support HEIC EXIF & XMP profiles with the minor version release of the graphics editing tool ImageMagick 7.0.8.25. The 18.3.2 version of the Mesa library and Mesa-drivers were updated, which provided a number of fixes for the RADV Vulkan drivers. The apache2 package was updated to 2.4.38 and the update lists the mod_lua module as stable. Fixed conflicting items in rule dialogs were fixed with the autoyast2 4.1.0 update. Ceph’s updated package had a fix for SignatureMismatchError in s3 commands. The support library used in the Xfce desktop exo 0.12.4 fix highlight rendering with GTK 3. The scalable, distributed file system glusterfs had a major update jump from version 4.0.2 to 5.3. The new version added several new management and standalone features and the dot three minor version provided a fix for Filesystem in Userspace (FUSE) client’s memory leak. The major release of openconnect 8.02 added Cisco-compatible DTLSv1.2 support. Another major version release was libvirt 5.0.0 that added support for Open vSwitch with the new feature for Xen. Other packages that were updated were the kernel firmware, gnutls, libstorage-ng 4.1.84, llvm 7.0.1, mercurial 4.9 and python-setuptools 40.7.2. The sysconfig package moved backward from version 0.85.0 to 0.84.3.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 Beta 3 is ready for testing!

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SUSE

Here comes Beta 3 of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1...

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Also: SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Public Beta is available!

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Containerized desktop applications with podman

    Everybody is talking about containers these days, however most of the discussion revolves around use cases in the context of server applications. Today I’d like to discuss a maybe slightly unusual, but nonetheless interesting use case for containers: running Linux desktop applications within a container with otherwise unchanged look & feel. To add some spice to the mix, I will explain this at the example of podman (I could equally well have chosen docker, but I like true open source software).

  • The SUSECON 2019 Session Catalog is Now Live!

    With over 150 sessions and 12 certification exams to choose from, create your own experience, learn about the topics most important to you, and get the certifications you need. Spots are limited per session, so be sure to grab your seat now.

  • It’s time you think about upgrading, from SUSE Enterprise Storage 4 to 5.5

    SUSE Enterprise Storage 5.5 has been available since October 2, 2018. Many of our customers have migrated to the new release and many are evaluating it. If you’re currently running SUSE Enterprise Storage 4 you really need to start thinking about upgrading. There were many new features added and improvements made in release 5.5. Upgrading will also prepare you for future releases.

Upcoming openSUSE and Fedora Voting (Board Elections and Wallpapers)

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Voting Gets Underway for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

    The ballots are out and the 2-week voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections now gets underway, with a total of seven top quality Candidates running.

    If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email with the elections url and your credential to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.  You may cast your vote starting now and until February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so. The election ballots will close February 15, 2019 at 23h00 UTC.

  • Fedora 30 – Supplemental Wallpaper

    The voting process happens inside Nuancier so you can go now and vote, dont forget to claim the badge, its not given by hand.

  • Fedora 29 : The Piskel application.

My First 24 Hours With openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Reviews
SUSE

My understanding is that elementary OS and openSUSE Tumbleweed couldn't be more different. The former is designed to be lean, minimalistic and beginner-friendly, while the latter has a wealth of software bundled in (its 2x larger ISO download size makes that obvious), allows users to choose multiple desktop environments during the installation and can be heavily customized.

[...]

By default, I don't expect to have issues with Linux OS installers. The ones I've reviewed -- such as Deepin and Pop!_OS -- have been attractive, intuitive affairs. For those of you who haven't tried Linux in years, they're incredibly simple compared their past iterations.

The standard graphical installer for openSUSE Tumbleweed, however, threw me a curveball.

Advancing through initial options like network setup, region, packages and desktop environment was straightforward. But then as the install process began I was met with puzzling "Wrong Digest" messages.

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Continues Speeding Ahead For Open-Source Mali Graphics
    Panfrost only made its initial debut as part of the recent Mesa 19.1 release for providing open-source Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard graphics driver support on Linux independent of Arm and their official binary driver. While the resources are limited, so far Panfrost is making stellar progress.  Panfrost continues making terrific progress for providing open-source Arm Mali graphics support. In part, this is made by possible by lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig currently interning for the summer at Collabora where she appears to be primarily working on this currently OpenGL ES 2.0 class driver and continuing to strive for competitive performance with Arm's official Linux GLES driver.
  • The big Civilization VI "June 2019 Update" for Gathering Storm is now live
    Firaxis Games, Aspyr Media and 2K today put out a rather large update to Civilization VI, the June 2019 for Gathering Storm adds in some new features and comes with plenty of balance changes and bug fixes.
  • Free and open source software is being sold commercially in the Microsoft Store
    Ever since Microsoft, one of the original and squarely proprietary tech giants, pivoted from software to services some years back, its relationship with free and open source software seems to have improved. For one thing, Microsoft replies on such things as open source flagship Linux for its cloud infrastructure. And the company also made a series of moves indicating it was now a better, gentler version of its old self, seeking not only to use open source software but also contribute back to it.
  • The Best Free Photoshop Alternatives
    GIMP, or GNU Image Manipulation Program, is more than just a photo editor. It also has sophisticated image manipulation tools, which will appeal to pros as well as regular uers.   GIMP has the expected assortment of basic features, including cropping and straightening to adjusting brightness, contrast, and color balance to name a few. Plus it has more advanced tools, like layers, content rescaling, and animation, plus the ability to add blur, noise, and distortion, among other effects. In fact GIMP offers most of the features that Photoshop has, even if it is missing things like other color modes besides RGB and the capability for non-destructive editing. Even better, GIMP’s interface is very customizable, and its features are expandable. Since it is open source, GIMP community members can create plugins, and they often do, sharing them to the rest of the community for free.
  • Nvidia and ARM join forces to eighty-six x86 supercomputers

    Team Green, which has a thing for making lunchbox-sized supercomputers, will be making its CUDA-X AI and high-performance computing (HPC) software work nicely with the ARM ecosystem, which means a load of processors based on CPUs and architectures coming out of the Cambridge chip designer.

  • When the Atari ST Was the Future of Computing
    The Atari 520ST was Atari's first 16-bit salvo in the personal computer wars of the 1980s. A
  • New vulnerabilities may let hackers remotely SACK Linux and FreeBSD systems
  • Linux Kernel Bug Knocks PCs, IoT Gadgets and More Offline
  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns
    “There’s absolutely nothing in there that would pose a security risk. The books are written for consumers - people at home,” he said. “There’s very little about there in networking and there’s certainly nothing about breaking into networks.” Prison officials said the bans aren’t arbitrary or a blanket prohibition on technology-focused books. Instead, they’re a reflection of the resources available to inmates. “We allow our folks in custody to have a lot of access to computers,” said Kelly Raths, the department’s central mailroom administrator. Inmates in Oregon facilities can have USB drives, allowing them to store college papers or legal pleadings and transport them between computers, Raths said. Classrooms inside prisons have networked computers.
  • Slimbook Launches New "Apollo" Linux PC, First Beta for Service Pack 5 of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Is Out, NVIDIA Binary Drivers for Ubuntu Growing Stale, DragonFly BSD v 5.6 Released and Qt v. 5.12.4 Now Available
    Slimbook, the Spanish Linux computer company, just unveiled a brand-new all-in-one Linux PC called the "Apollo". It has a 23.6 inch IPS LED display with a 1920x1080 resolution, and a choice between an Intel i5-8500 and i7-8700 processors. It comes with up to 32GB of RAM and integrated Intel UHD 630 4K graphics. Pricing starts at $799.

Linux Distributions for IoT: A Guide to Making the Right Choice

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