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Servers: IBM, Red Hat and SUSE

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Don't count out IBM virtualization on the Z platform
  • IBM-Red Hat merger timing, fairness in question

    Red Hat posted 2019 year-end financial results this week that exceeded analyst expectations, but the company said nothing about its pending $34 billion purchase by IBM as industry experts question the value to Linux users and whether the deal will actually close in the second half of this year.

    While major roadblocks to the IBM-Red Hat merger have yet to become public, its sheer size has some industry observers in speculation mode.

    "If this deal doesn't go through, it wouldn't be a problem for anyone except IBM," said Dana Gardner, principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions LLC in Gilford, N.H. "People are quite happy with an independent Red Hat overseeing the development of an important product like Linux along with a cloud software infrastructure stack."

    For the most part, IT pros weren't excited about the deal because of what IBM brings to Red Hat, but what Red Hat brings to IBM, Gardner said. This is reflected in the "staggering" $34 billion IBM paid for Red Hat, he added.

  • Going to SUSECON ’19? Get $5!

    Have you been coveting your very own SUSE chameleon? How about a pair of SUSE socks? Or maybe it’s a notebook that you want to take home? The options to turn your office green are endless. And to jumpstart your journey, the Support team wants to give you $5!

  • Six First Impressions of SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    While I’ve been developing for Kubernetes for a few years now, I am pretty new to both SUSE and Cloud Foundry. I’ve got to say that both have been great experiences! SUSE is a fantastic place to work and our Cloud Foundry distribution (SUSE Cloud Application Platform) makes my development life easier.

  • A Syllabus to SUSE CaaS Platform at SUSECON

    NASHVILLE, BABY!!! That’s right, I’m hitting my old college stomping grounds for SUSECON!!
    Returning to Nashville brings me memories of housing Ben and Jerry’s Stephen Colbert Americone Dream from the Piggly Wiggly after learning that Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce were traded away from the Celtics, finding the single Dunkin’ Donuts in Nashville and moving into the apartment building next to it, blasting Jay Z’s Reasonable Doubt out of my dorm room windows, and paying more attention to the girl who sat next to me in ECON 2 than my professor (Sorry, Dr. C…)

    Ah man. Those were the days…

    Anyway, SUSECON! I’m the PMM for SUSE CaaS Platform! That’s what I’m here to write about!

  • Is Kubernetes The Next Big Enterprise App Platform? That Depends On How Many Apps Can Run On It

Happy Birthday SAP Linux Lab!

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Server
SUSE

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the SAP Linux Lab, and Suse was there from the beginning. Here are some highlights of two decades of collaboration.
When the SAP Linux Lab was founded in 1999, many could not be convinced of its importance in the SAP realm.

The reason for that is simple. At the time, Unix and Windows were the dominant SAP IT infrastructures. However, SAP Linux Lab was only supposed to ensure that SAP solutions running on the open source operating system Linux would be optimally supported. Consequently, many people questioned why they would even need another operating system for SAP, especially an open source one.

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openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

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SUSE
Obits

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life.

We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community.

Read more

Obituary: Peter T. Linnell

SUSE: More on SUSE Manager, "Independence" Media Blitz and SUSECON 2019

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SUSE
  • Managing Linux in the Cloud

    SUSE Manager extends the ideals of DevOps to the cloud environment, unlocking a world of rapid deployment and automation.

  • Where next for SUSE?

    Where next for SUSE? The company mentioned its independence no less than 12 times in a recent notice to the press. Flush with investor money, can the business finally steer its own ship to success?

  • SUSECON 2019: These Industry Kingpins Have Something to Say

    I really learned a lot at this event. The access to people who know their stuff is something I did not expect. They are really helpful!

    I loved it. It was interesting and fun. Very good to meet other people and exchange experiences.

SUSE: Future and Independence

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SUSE
  • The Future of SUSE: A Home for Truly Open Open Source Solutions

    While this might look like a big change for SUSE, the fact is that for myself and the rest of the leadership team here, it’s a fulfillment of a path we’ve been following for a long time.
    In fact, there are no changes to the essence of our mission, vision and strategy. We will continue our focus on the success of our customers and our commitments to our partners and open source communities and projects.
    Events and trends in IT make it clear that open source has become more important for enterprises than ever. We believe this makes our position as the largest independent open source company more important than ever. SUSE’s independence is aligned with a single-minded focus on delivering what is best for our customers and partners, coupled with full control over our own destiny.

  • SUSE Completes Move to Independence, Reaffirms Commitment to Customers, Partners and Open Source Communities as Industry’s Largest Independent Open Source Company

    SUSE® today announced the creation of the largest independent open source company following the completion of SUSE’s acquisition by growth investor EQT from Micro Focus. With its ongoing momentum, portfolio expansion and successful execution in the marketplace, as a standalone business SUSE is now even better positioned to focus on the needs of customers and partners as a leading provider of enterprise-grade, open source software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that enable customer workloads anywhere – on premise, hybrid and multi-cloud – with exceptional service, value and flexibility.
    The newly independent SUSE has expanded its executive team, adding new leadership roles and experience to foster its continued momentum into this next stage of corporate development. Enrica Angelone has been named to the new post of chief financial officer, and Sander Huyts is SUSE’s new chief operations officer. Thomas Di Giacomo, formerly chief technology officer for SUSE, is now president of Engineering, Product and Innovation. All three report to SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann.

  • SUSE completes its management transition

    Here's a SUSE press release hyping its transition to being "the largest independent open-source company".

  • SUSE Marks Its New Independence Under EQT Ownership

    It was in July of last year that Swedish private equity firm EQT Partners acquired SUSE from Micro Focus. That deal is now closed and SUSE is marking its independence today while proclaiming to be the largest independent open-source company.

SUSE: On SUSE OpenStack Cloud and 'The Internet of Things' (IoT)

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SUSE
  • Keep an Open Mind in an Open Source World

    On the other hand, open source is emerging as the platform for innovation.  Open source is a vastly fertile landscape providing countless opportunities to share and expand.  I ask that you keep an open mind as we explore SUSE OpenStack Cloud and the beautiful synergy that it will create in your data center with VMware.

    You have spent years and possibly decades in building out your data center with the sprawling nature of VMware.  Implementing SUSE OpenStack Cloud means you continue to leverage your current assets, complementing them with an infrastructure that will prepare you or the future.

  • Is 2019 the Year IoT and Edge Computing Comes of Age?

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the hottest technology topics of the moment – and for very good reasons.  We all know we’re living in an increasingly interconnected world and are constantly looking for new ways to take full advantage of it.
    On a more personal level, our mobile smart devices have become our access point to the rapidly expanding digital universe surrounding us.  They are now so much a part of our lives that we tap, swipe or click our mobile phone an average of 2,617 times a day. That makes each of us an IoT end-point, as we progressively consume more information, data, and services. Our appetite is growing so fast that mobile data traffic is predicted to reach 930 exabytes by 2022, which is expected to be 20% of all IP traffic that year.
    It’s no wonder that every major IT analyst firm has been focused on IoT for some time and that they all have edge computing included in their top strategic technology predictions for 2019. IDC predicts that IoT spending will reach $745 billion this year and there will be 31 billion end-points (things) connected by 2022.

Red Hat and SUSE: Drools, Systemd, Libinput, Fedora and Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

    Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

  • Why feedback, not metrics, is critical to DevOps

    Most managers and agile coaches depend on metrics over feedback from their teams, users, and even customers. In fact, quite a few use feedback and metrics synonymously, where they present feedback from teams or customers as a bunch of numbers or a graphical representation of those numbers. This is not only unfortunate, but it can be misleading as it presents only part of the story and not the entire truth.

  • L2TP Tunnel Support Added To Systemd

    The newest feature addition for systemd is supporting L2TP, the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, as part of its networking code. 

    Systemd's networkd now has support merged for LT2TP tunnel support. L2TP can be used for extending a local area network (LAN) or also for VPN purposes when paired with the likes of IPsec for providing encryption. L2TP also has a variety of other use-cases with this bare protocol able to offer a layer two link over an L3 network.

  • libinput 1.12.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    Only two notable features in this release but patches are accumulating on
    master, it's been 6 months since 1.12 and I've decided to postpone the two
    major features (hi-res scrolling and totem support) to 1.14.
    
    
    
    
    Touch arbitration has improved for tablets, especially on touch screens.
    A timer set on pen proximity out means we don't get ghost touches anymore
    when the hand lifts off slower than the pen itself. And location-based touch
    arbitration means that parts of the screen can be interacted with even while
    the pen is in proximity. libinput uses the tilt information where
    available to disable touches in a rectangle around the pen where the hand is
    likely to be but leaves the rest of the touchscreen available otherwise.
    Where the UI supports it, this allows for bimanual interaction.
    
    
    
    
    The test suite is installed on demand (meson -Dinstall-tests=true). Where
    run from the installed location it will use the normal library lookups and
    the quirks directory as defined by the prefix. This makes it useful for
    distribution-level testing, i.e. run this on a test machine after updating
    the package to make sure everything is as expected. Where available, you can
    invoke it with the "libinput test-suite" command.
    
    
    
    
    Other than that, a load of fixes, quirks added, cleanups, tidy-ups and so on
    an so forth.
    
    
    
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below. Many thanks to all the contributors.
  • Libinput 1.13 Is Coming But High-Resolution Scrolling & Dell Totem Support Delayed

    Libinput is fairly mature at this stage for offering a unified input handling library for use on both X.Org and Wayland Linux desktops. Libinput has largely reached a feature plateau with new releases no longer coming out so often and no glaring gaps in support. With it already being a half-year since the last major release, libinput 1.13 is now being buttoned up for release and available today is the first release candidate. 

    Libinput 1.13 isn't that exciting of a release particularly since maintainer Peter Hutterer of Red Hat decided to delay the high resolution scrolling support. The Linux 5.0 kernel brought the much anticipated high resolution scrolling support for various Logitech/Microsoft mice to improve the scroll-wheel experience. Besides the kernel support, there is also the user-space support that needs updating. Peter decided to delay this functionality now until Libinput 1.14 to give it more time to bake.

  • New package in Fedora: python-xslxwriter
  • First Public Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0!

SUSE Blogs and News

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SUSE
  • Stratos: Customizing and Extending your Cloud Foundry UI

    A few weeks ago the Cloud Foundry Foundation gave me the opportunity to talk about one of SUSE’s main contributions to Cloud Foundry.

    Stratos is the open source UI for Cloud Foundry, which SUSE donated to the Cloud Foundry Incubator a little over a year ago. It’s an important part of SUSE Cloud Application Platform and our multi-cloud platform strategy.

  • Combine the performance of solid-state drive with the capacity of a hard drive with Bcache and YaST

    Usual readers of the YaST Team development sprint reports on this blog already know we have been working steadily on adding support for the Bcache technology to the YaST Partitioner. We have already reached a point in which we consider such feature to be ready to be shipped with openSUSE Leap 15.1 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1. That sounds like a nice occasion to offer the full picture in a single blog post, so our beloved users don’t need to dig into several blog posts to know what the future releases will bring regarding Bcache in YaST. Needless to say, all this is already available for openSUSE Tumbleweed users, or will be available in the following weeks.

  • Backed by SUSE Support – Always On!

    There are many considerations to weigh when deciding whether an open source solution is right for your business. Pros to open source software range from its availability to anyone, even those who can’t afford commercial software, to the flexibility of open source programs to work with almost any type of platform, which helps extend hardware life and avoids the need to constantly replace them. Not to mention, it can be installed for free and be used and deployed again and again on multiple machines without the need of tracking the license compliance and terms of use.

  • SUSE “Universe” is expanding. Visit us at Micro Focus Universe in Vienna!

    Although SUSE and Micro Focus companies are separating, we share a close partnership and it’s expanding, like the universe. Sorry, I couldn’t help myself. As the open, open source company, SUSE is an integral part of the open source community and will never lock-in customers. Come see us in Vienna, hear about what our plans and how SUSE and Micro Focus will be working together going forward.

Server: ClusterShell, CLI, ERP, Cockpit, SAP, SUSE

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Server
Software
SUSE
  • ClusterShell – A Nifty Tool To Run Commands On Cluster Nodes In Parallel

    We had written two articles in the past to run commands on multiple remote server in parallel.

    These are Parallel SSH (PSSH) or Distributed Shell (DSH).

    Today also, we are going to discuss about the same kind of topic but it allows us to perform the same on cluster nodes as well.

    You may think, i can write a small shell script to archive this instead of installing these third party packages.

    Of course you are right and if you are going to run some commands in 10-15 remote systems then you don’t need to use this.

  • What's your favorite Linux terminal emulator?

    Most terminal emulators are graphical programs that run on any Linux graphical desktop environment, like KDE, Cinnamon, LXDE, GNOME, and others, and can emulate several different types of hardware terminals.
    There are many terminal emulators available for Linux. The first one, Xterm, was developed in 1984 by Thomas Dickey. Xterm is still maintained and packaged as part of many modern Linux distributions. Other popular terminal emulators include Konsole, Tilix, RXVT, GNOME terminal, Terminator, Xfce4-terminal, and LXTerminal; each has interesting features that appeal to specific groups of users. For example, some can open multiple tabs or terminals in a single window. Others have just the minimum set of features required and are typically used when small size and efficiency are called for.

    I use three terminal emulators consistently, switching between them depending on the features I need—or sometimes just because they are there. Sometimes I just want a change.

  • 14 Best Free Linux ERP Software

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) manages the information and functions of a business. It provides an integrated system by which the entire business can be managed. Not only does ERP improve the efficiency of an organisation it also serves to help the firm’s management make more informed decisions.

    Businesses constantly face a moving target. With globalization, competition from emerging countries, and technological improvements, organisations need to change. Traditional communication tools such as the facsimile have long been replaced by email. The internet has meant that information needs to be available at all hours of the day, not merely the working day. A modern business system needs to adapt accordingly. ERP software helps firms to rise to this challenge.

    ERP software is an integrated suite of applications which commonly cover areas such as distribution, accounting, inventory, invoicing, shipping, logistics and manufacturing. Such software is not only beneficial for large multinational organisations, as small and medium size enterprises can gain significant improvements in their efficiency by deploying ERP software.

    All of the software featured in this article is released under a freely distributable license. Some of the software applications have proprietary versions too, which add custom features and additional functionality.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 14 high quality free Linux ERP software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to enhance their organisation’s efficiency.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 189

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 189.

  • There’s no such thing as a bad question…especially when choosing your partners for your SAP project

    Growing up in the US education system, there was one thing drilled into me almost above all else: “There is no such thing as a bad question” and conversely, “the only bad question is the one not asked.” As with most things in life, asking questions and, specifically, asking the right questions can often be the difference in success or disappointment. Asking questions is such a fundamental step in every decision in our lives, whether it be related to our career or personal lives, that we almost take it for granted. Imagine trying to find a partner or a spouse without asking questions. In business, just in life, asking the right questions and, ultimately, finding the right partners can have long last lasting and not easily undone consequences both very, very good and well, not so good.

  • HOT Off the Presses, a RA for the Container Age!

    As a technology marketer, I build and come across a lot of marketing collateral. Out of the full spectrum, the ones that get downloaded and shared the most are case studies and reference architectures. The reason is simple, before you sign on to a pretty big technology commitment, you want to feel some assurance that others have done this, and there is a guaranteed “win” at the end. So I was very excited when technologists on our Dell Alliance team published our 1st SUSE CaaS Platform Reference Implementation on Dell EMC infrastructure.

  • The Days After ServerlessDays ATX

    I recently spent the day at Serverless Days in Austin, Texas, and it was interesting for a lot of reasons. The first was that it was in a movie theater. There was no running around to different conference halls — it was just sit in your big, comfy theater chair and enjoy the show. It was nice. There was no FOMO on the other talks — everything was very simple and singularly focused. Not to mention, this was not just any movie theater — this was none other than the Alamo Drafthouse Theater, which makes all other theaters relinquish their pride, as they could never compete with the comfort, the food, or the quirkiness that is the Alamo Drafthouse.

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Introduction to MLFlow on OpenShift – Mani Parkhe (Databricks) and Zak Hassan (Red Hat)

    In this OpenShift Commons Briefing, DataBricks‘ Mani Parkhe gave an excellant introduction to MLFlow, an open source platform to manage the Machine Learning lifecycle, including experimentation, reproducibility and deployment.

  • Bali, Indonesia, Selected for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019

    For the second time, Indonesia was chosen to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 event. A similar event was held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2016 and was attended by hundreds of local openSUSE lover as well as from other Asian countries. This year we are challenged to repeat the successful story of the openSUSE.Asia Summit on one of the most exotic islands in Indonesia, Bali.

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is an event awaited by fans of openSUSE in Indonesia in particular, and activists of Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) in general. In this activity, experts, contributors, end users, and technology enthusiasts gather to share experiences about the development of openSUSE and other things related to FLOSS and have a lot of fun.

    The island of Bali was chosen as the venue for the openSUSE.Asia Summit after being proposed by the Indonesian community during openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 in Taipei, Tawian. After going through a long discussion, the Asian committee chose Bali as the host of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be from October 5 to October 6, 2019, at Udayana University, Bali.

  • Get Ready to Get Your SUSECON On!
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