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Events: Cloud Foundry Summit, OpenSUSE Asia and FSFE System Hackers

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OSS
SUSE
  • The Importance of Culture in Software Development

    A few weeks ago at Cloud Foundry Summit, I had the chance to grab a few of our partners and talk about how culture plays a part in the software development process. While appropriate tools are very important, it is only part of the story. Culture will make or break any change initiative regardless of how amazing our technology is.

  • openSUSE Asia Summit

    I met Edwin and Ary earlier this year at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg. They invited me to come to the openSUSE Asia Summit happening in Bali. I wasn't sure that I would be able to attend it. But then, around June I saw a tweet reminding about the deadline for the Call for Proposal for the openSUSE Asia Summit and I thought maybe I should give it a try.

    I submitted a workshop proposal on MicroOS and a lightning talk proposal to the openSUSE Asia CFP team. Both were accepted and I couldn't be happier. It gave me the chance to meet friends from the openSUSE community again, learn and share more.

    We do not have direct flights to Indonesia. I traveled through Air Mauritius to Kuala Lumpur and then Malaysia Arlines to Denpasar, Bali. I spent almost 24 hours traveling before reaching my hotel in Jimbaran. I was totally knackered when I arrived but the enthusiasm of being there for the summit was stronger than anything.

    I booked a taxi through Traveloka ahead of my arrival in Bali. It was recommended by Edwin. When I compared other taxi fares I felt glad I booked it online. I also bought a SIM card on my way to the hotel with a 6GB data package. I knew we'd all communicate mostly on Telegram, just as we did for oSC 2019. My hotel WiFi connection wasn't great but I was impressed by the 4G coverage of my mobile Internet provider, XL Axiata. Mobile connectivity was extremely helpful as I would rely on GoJek car-hailing for the next few days.

  • The 3rd FSFE System Hackers hackathon

    On 10 and 11 October, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to tackle problems and new features regarding the servers and services the FSFE is running. The team consists of dedicated volunteers who ensure that the community and staff can work effectively. The recent meeting built on the great work of the past 2 years which have been shaped by large personal and technical changes.

    The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Digital Transformation – it’s dead, Jim?

    However, digital transformation is like life – it’s an ongoing process, not something you just do once and then it’s done and dusted. A large part of digital transformation is your cloud strategy, which I wrote about fairly recently. That is also something that isn’t a one-off task, but is instead an evolving, transformational process. It was interesting to see, after speaking to attendees at the Gartner event in Frankfurt, that a number of them still hadn’t defined their cloud strategy outside of “we need to move everything to the cloud for cost savings and agility”, while some hadn’t even begun writing a cloud strategy.
    Looking at a chart showing the trends in Google searches for digital transformation in the US (the global trend is the same) over the past 5 years, you can see that while it trends up and then down fairly regularly, it still continues to grow on the whole. So if it’s been around for a while, why does it continue to grow, and is it still relevant?

  • New Security Tools for Application Delivery

    What if you could shut down cybercriminals’ most frequently used method of attack? At SUSE we’ve recently made a move to help you get closer to that goal.

    As you may know, SUSE recently released new versions of our application delivery solutions, SUSE CaaS Platform 4 and SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.5. The releases contain a number of important updates and features, but the one most exciting in terms of protecting your organization is the addition of Cilium to SUSE CaaS Platform.

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ceph and OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed Progress

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SUSE
  • Can I deploy Ceph on older hardware?

    You just retired a bunch of servers and disk arrays, but before you place hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars’ worth of equipment on the curb, you’re wondering if you can use it for a Ceph-based storage solution like SUSE Enterprise Storage. The answer is: maybe.

    SUSE prides itself on supporting a wide range of hardware, from blades to retail terminals to IoT devices. In fact, SUSE makes it possible to easily deploy a wide range of software on that hardware and certify it will work through the SUSE YES Certification Program. SUSE Yes Certification assures your IHV equipment is fully compatible with SUSE software, including SUSE Enterprise Storage.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/42

    Another week has passed with again four snapshots published. This pace seems to be holding pretty solid and I think it’s not the worst speed there is. During this week, we have released the snapshots 1011, 1012, 1014 and 1016. As usual, some were smaller, some were bigger.

Events: openSUSE Asia Summit, EmacsConf and LaKademy

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GNU
KDE
SUSE
  • openSUSE Asia Summit 2019: Summit Preparation

    Actually, this journey begins in 2015. I attending Indonesia Linux Conference, that’s the first time I meet people from openSUSE Indonesia. Mr. Edwin Zakaria. I remember, he gave me Alex the Gecko T-Shirt from Babacucu.com. My first openSUSE T-shirt.

    After attending the conference. I also invited to KPLI (Kelompok Pengguna Linux Indonesia: it’s like Indonesian Linux Users) meeting at Gucci, Tegal with my boss, Pak Vavai. It’s an honor for me. Because I remember, I was a kid who never knew about a community before.

  • November 2: Save the date! EmacsConf is coming to Boston

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is happy to announce our office in Boston as the next official EmacsConf satellite! Join us on Saturday, November 2 for an all-day event on everyone's favorite self-documenting, customizable, and extensible editor: GNU Emacs! The FSF will join ZĂźrich, Switzerland as the second physical satellite to EmacsConf, which will be held online this year.

  • Announcing LaKademy 2019

    The seventh edition of the KDE Latin-American Summit (LaKademy 2019) is ready to go! It will take place at Salvador-Bahia, northeastern Brazil, from 14th to 17th November. 24 participants, hopefully accompanied by some local guests, will meet at Information Technology Superintendence of Federal University of Bahia for four days of hacking sessions, promo meetings, and all sort of KDE-related things.

    Salvador (the city I live in) is well known for its beatiful beaches, the biggest carnival in the planet, and its unique cuisine. In November, attendees can already have a glimpse on our warm summer and hopefully that will bring a bunch of additional energy for having a fun and productive meeting.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Plasma, Applications, Frameworks arrive in Latest Tumbleweed Snapshot

    The most recent snapshot, 20191014, updated several packages around KDE’s projects. Plasma 5.17.0 arrived in the snapshot and there are some extraordinary changes to the new version. The release announcement says this new version is as lightweight and thrifty with resources as ever before. The start-up scripts were converted from a slower Bash to a faster C++ and now run asynchronously, which means it can run several tasks simultaneously, instead of having to run them one after another. Improvements to the widget editing User Experience were made and the Night Color feature became available, which subtly changes the hue and brightness of the elements on the screen when it gets dark; this diminishes glare and makes it more relaxing to the eyes. The same snapshot brought KDE Applications 19.08.2 and the second version of the 19.08 release improved High-DPI support in Konsole and other applications; there were many bugs fixes as well and KMail can once again save messages directly to remote folders. There was more KDE packages arriving in Tumbleweed with the update of KDE Frameworks 5.63.0; KIO, Kirigami and KTextEditor had the most bug fixes in frameworks latest release. The Tumbleweed snapshot had several other software packages updated like the file system utilities package e2fsprogs 1.45.4, which addressed Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures CVE-2019-5094 where an attacker would have been able to corrupt a ext4 partition. The 3.6.10 version of gnutls added support for deterministic Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) / Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA). Text editor Nano updated to version 4.5 and offers a new ‘tabgives’ command allowing users to specify per syntax whatthe key should produce. The php7 7.3.10 version modified some patches and fixed some bugs. With all these changes, the snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 95, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

  • Multi-cloud Management: Stratos and Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Neil MacDougall and Troy Topnik of SUSE presented a talk demonstrating and describing the work that SUSE has done to extend the Stratos management interface to include support for Kubernetes and Helm. They talked about how SUSE has used the Stratos extension mechanism to add new endpoint types for Kubernetes and Helm and we showed some of the features that SUSE has been developing. They wrapped things up by talking about where SUSE is headed next in extending Stratos beyond Cloud Foundry into a Multi-cloud Management interface.

Kubernetes at SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Eirinix: Writing Extensions for Eirini

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov and Ettore Di Giacinto of SUSE presented a talk about Eirini — a project that allows the deployment and management of applications on Kubernetes using the Cloud Foundry Platform. They introduced eirinix — a framework that allows developers to extend Eirini. Eirinix is built from the Quarks codebase, which leverages Kubernetes Mutating Webhooks. With the flexibility of Kubernetes and Eirini’s architecture, developers can now build features around Eirini, like Persi support, access to the application via SSH, ASGs via Network Policies and more. In this talk, they explained how this can be done, and how everyone can start contributing to a rich ecosystem of extensions that will improve Eirini and the developer experience of Cloud Foundry.

  • Building an open ML platform with Red Hat OpenShift and Open Data Hub Project

    Unaddressed, these challenges impact the speed, efficiency and productivity of the highly valuable data science teams. This leads to frustration, lack of job satisfaction and ultimately the promise of AI/ML to the business is not redeemed.

    IT departments are being challenged to address the above. IT has to deliver a cloud-like experience to data scientists. That means a platform that offers freedom of choice, is easy to access, is fast and agile, scales on-demand and is resilient. The use of open source technologies will prevent lockin, and maintain long term strategic leverage over cost.

    In many ways, a similar dynamic has played out in the world of application development in the past few years that has led to microservices, the hybrid cloud and automation and agile processes. And IT has addressed this with containers, kubernetes and open hybrid cloud.

    So how does IT address this challenge in the world of AI – by learning from their own experiences in the world of application development and applying to the world of AI/ML. IT addresses the challenge by building an AI platform that is container based, that helps build AI/ML services with agile process that accelerates innovation and is built with the hybrid cloud in mind.

  • Launching OpenShift/Kubernetes Support for Solarflare Cloud Onload

    This is a guest post co-written by Solarflare, a Xilinx company. Miklos Reiter is Software Development Manager at Solarflare and leads the development of Solarflare’s Cloud Onload Operator. Zvonko Kaiser is Team Lead at Red Hat and leads the development of the Node Feature Discovery operator.

Dodging derailment by SUSE, OpenStack Train is scheduled to arrive this week

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Server
OSS
SUSE

With its OpenInfrastructure summit mere weeks away, the OpenStack gang is emitting its next release in the form of "Train" with a focus on data protection and machine learning.

The release comes after foundation platinum member SUSE threw in the towel over OpenStack Cloud in order to move on to a bright, Kubernetes-based future.

Not that the "S" word was mentioned, even in a waveringly high-pitched tone, as OpenStack readied Train ahead of a release expected on 16 October.

As is the norm, OpenStack was keen to shout about the more than 25,500 accepted code changes this time around, from 1,125 developers over 150 organisations. A glance at the content of the release shows that OpenStack is as bewilderingly vast as ever, although a number of tweaks merit closer attention.

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SUSE: Highlights of OpenSUSE Asia Summit, Maintaining Enterprise Linux Kernels and More

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SUSE
  • Highlights of openSUSE Asia Summit 2019

    The openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the big events for the openSUSE community (i.e. both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who normally communicate online can meet from all over the world, talk in person and have fun. Members of the community share their current knowledge, experience and learn FLOSS technologies around openSUSE. The openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 took place from October 5 to October 6, 2019 at the Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University, Bali.

  • Maintaining Enterprise Linux Kernels

    Forking the Linux kernel and using it as the basis of an Enterprise product is a challenging task. The pace of development in the upstream Linux kernel makes it hard to keep up with all the fixes that need to be backported. This article describes the process we use at SUSE to find and backport potentially required upstream fixes to our kernels.

    [...]

    Every fix that is reported will be evaluated by a developer and either backported to the kernel branches that need it or blacklisted, so that the fix is no longer considered. But who is the best person (or group) to report a fix to?
    The answer is easy if the fix is for a patch that was backported by someone within SUSE as part of a service pack development cycle. In that case the person who backported the patch is tasked with reviewing the associated fix. The same happens with upstream fixes that are authored or committed by a SUSE employee.
    Assigning fixes for patches that are part of the base-kernel is a bit more complicated. To that end we have introduced a maintainer model with an internal list of experts for most parts of the Linux kernel.
    The approach is similar to the MAINTAINERS file in the upstream Linux kernel, but the file at SUSE is simpler. It only contains a list of people and several path-specs per entry. Each potential fix for the base-kernel is matched against the path-specs in the maintainers list and assigned to the best matching entry. The fix is reported to the developers listed in the matching entry.
    But not all fixes could be assigned that way because the SUSE maintainers list does not cover the whole kernel source tree. For the remaining fixes a heuristic is used. It is based on which source code files in the kernel source tree are touched by the backports of each developer. This is matched against the file(s) a fix touches.

  • Suse: Equipped For The Hybrid Multicloud Age

    Linux as an operating system platform as well as other Open Source technologies as core elements are used in SAP infrastructures. This is applicable for Cloud as well as on-premises deployment. Thus, they are equipped for the Hybrid Multicloud age.
    Open Source arrived in the SAP world a long time ago. The Walldorf-based software company contributed to this development when it made the decision to only use the Linux operating system platform along with SAP Hana and Hana-based application solutions such as S/4.

    And the trend towards Linux with NetWeaver-based infrastructures with AnyDB has already provided the impetus for the deep penetration of Linux. The Hana figures quoted by SAP recently (during this year’s Sapphire conference) speak to this significance. The company now has 50,000 Hana licenses. In addition to Linux, other Open Source solutions are used in SAP environments in conjunction with Data Science and the use of Kubernetes. Kubernetes is used for the orchestration of containers as part of SAP Data Hub environments.

KDE and openSUSE, YaST Development Sprint

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KDE
SUSE
  • KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.17, Qt 5.14 and more

    The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team.

    openQA found a few bugs already, like GIMP looking more “colorful” than usual and some applications mixing Kirigami and Qt Widgets breaking some keyboard shortcuts. Both of those were addressed meanwhile and will be fixed in the final release of 5.17.

    If you haven’t tested the Plasma 5.17 Beta yet, there’s still some time left! If you come across a problem in the software, please head over to the KDE bug tracker; if instead you find an issue that is openSUSE specific, go over to the openSUSE bugzilla.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 86

    Now that you had a chance to look at our post about Advanced Encryption Options (especially if you are an s390 user), it is time to check what happened during the last YaST development sprint, which finished last Monday.

Advanced Encryption Options Land in the YaST Partitioner

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

As you may know, so far the YaST Partitioner offered an “Encrypt Device” checkbox when creating or editing a block device. If such box is marked, the Partitioner asks for an encryption password and creates a LUKS virtual device on top of the device being encrypted.

LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) is the standard for Linux hard disk encryption. By providing a standard on-disk-format, it facilitates compatibility among distributions. LUKS stores all necessary setup information in the partition header, enabling to transport or migrate data seamlessly. So far, there are two format specifications for such header: LUKS1 and LUKS2. YaST uses LUKS1 because is established, solid and well-known, being fully compatible with the (open)SUSE installation process and perfectly supported by all the system tools and by most bootloaders, like Grub2.

You should not fix what is not broken. Thus, in most cases, the screen for encrypting a device has not changed at all and it still works exactly in the same way under the hood.

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