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SUSE

Richard Brown: Changing of the Guard

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SUSE

After six years on the openSUSE Board and five as its Chairperson, I have decided to step down as Chair of the openSUSE Board effective today, August 19.

This has been a very difficult decision for me to make, with reasons that are diverse, interlinked, and personal. Some of the key factors that led me to make this step include the time required to do the job properly, and the length of time I’ve served. Five years is more than twice as long as any of my predecessors. The time required to do the role properly has increased and I now find it impossible to balance the demands of the role with the requirements of my primary role as a developer in SUSE, and with what I wish to achieve outside of work and community. As difficult as it is to step back from something I’ve enjoyed doing for so long, I am looking forward to achieving a better balance between work, community, and life in general.

Serving as member and chair of the openSUSE Board has been an absolute pleasure and highly rewarding. Meeting and communicating with members of the project as well as championing the cause of openSUSE has been a joyous part of my life that I know I will miss going forward.

openSUSE won’t get rid of me entirely. While I do intend to step back from any governance topics, I will still be working at SUSE in the Future Technology Team. Following SUSE’s Open Source policy, we do a lot in openSUSE. I am especially looking forward to being able to focus on Kubic & MicroOS much more than I have been lately.

As I’m sure it’s likely to be a question, I wish to make it crystal clear that my decision has nothing to do with the Board’s ongoing efforts to form an independent openSUSE Foundation.

The Board’s decision to form a Foundation had my complete backing as Chairperson, and will continue to have as a regular openSUSE contributor. I have absolute confidence in the openSUSE Board; Indeed, I don’t think I would be able to make this decision at this time if I wasn’t certain that I was leaving openSUSE in good hands.

On that note, SUSE has appointed Gerald Pfeifer as my replacement as Chair. Gerald is SUSE’s EMEA-based CTO, with a long history as a Tumbleweed user, an active openSUSE Member, and upstream contributor/maintainer in projects like GCC and Wine.

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Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

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SUSE: Uyuni, openSUSE and Tumbleweed

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SUSE
  • openSUSE News: New 4.0.2 Version of Uyuni is Released

    Contributors of Uyuni Project have released a new version of Uyuni 4.0.2, which is an open-source infrastructure management solution tailored for software-defined infrastructure.

    Uyuni, a fork of the Spacewalk project, modernizing Spacewalk with SaltStack, provides more operating systems support and better scalability capabilities. Uyuni is now the upstream for SUSE Manager.

    With this release, Uyuni provides powerful new features such as monitoring, content lifecycle management and virtual machine management.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed ? Review of the weeks 2019/31 & 32

    As you certainly know, there are more snapshots tested than we release in the end. In the last two weeks, for example, we tested 9 snapshots. Of those, only 4 made it to the mirrors and to you ? the users. During the last two weeks, these were snapshots 0726, 0730, 0805 and 0806.

  • Communities in the distrowatch.org top 20

    Only well-funded corporate sponsored Linux distributions (Fedora, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE) have all categories checked. That doesn’t mean that anyone is getting paid. I believe this means that employees are probably the chief contributors and that means there are more people putting in resources to help.

    Some distributions are “Pat’s distribution”. Pat’s group owns it and Pat doesn’t want a steering committee or any other say in how the distro works. Though contributions by means of bug reports may be accepted.

    A few distributions “outsource” resources to other distributions. Elementary allows Stack Exchange to provide their forum. Parrot Linux refers users to the Debian wiki. Mint suggests that you put in bug reports with the upstream provider unless it is a specific Mint create application.

    There are a few Linux distributions that leave me scratching my head. How is this in the top 20 distros on distrowatch? There’s nothing here and the forum, if there is one, is nearly empty. Who uses this?

  • Vagrant Boxes with openSUSE Tumbleweed – Check it Out!

    As part of the SUSE Developer Engagement, we recently kicked off the activity to automatically produce and validate Vagrant boxes for the openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution. The creation of Vagrant boxes for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is currently work in progress. We will update you as soon as they are available for consumption.
    But for now, we are happy to announce that the infrastructure to automatically build, version and validate Vagrant box images is ready to use – and we are already producing Vagrant boxes for libvirt and Virtualbox – for openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Servers, SUSE, Red Hat and Fedora

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • My Favorite Infrastructure

    PCI policy pays a lot of attention to systems that manage sensitive cardholder data. These systems are labeled as "in scope", which means they must comply with PCI-DSS standards. This scope extends to systems that interact with these sensitive systems, and there is a strong emphasis on compartmentation—separating and isolating the systems that are in scope from the rest of the systems, so you can put tight controls on their network access, including which administrators can access them and how.

    Our architecture started with a strict separation between development and production environments. In a traditional data center, you might accomplish this by using separate physical network and server equipment (or using abstractions to virtualize the separation). In the case of cloud providers, one of the easiest, safest and most portable ways to do it is by using completely separate accounts for each environment. In this way, there's no risk that a misconfiguration would expose production to development, and it has a side benefit of making it easy to calculate how much each environment is costing you per month.

    When it came to the actual server architecture, we divided servers into individual roles and gave them generic role-based names. We then took advantage of the Virtual Private Cloud feature in Amazon Web Services to isolate each of these roles into its own subnet, so we could isolate each type of server from others and tightly control access between them.

    By default, Virtual Private Cloud servers are either in the DMZ and have public IP addresses, or they have only internal addresses. We opted to put as few servers as possible in the DMZ, so most servers in the environment only had a private IP address. We intentionally did not set up a gateway server that routed all of these servers' traffic to the internet—their isolation from the internet was a feature!

    Of course, some internal servers did need some internet access. For those servers, it was only to talk to a small number of external web services. We set up a series of HTTP proxies in the DMZ that handled different use cases and had strict whitelists in place. That way we could restrict internet access from outside the host itself to just the sites it needed, while also not having to worry about collecting lists of IP blocks for a particular service (particularly challenging these days since everyone uses cloud servers).

    [...]

    Although I covered a lot of ground in this infrastructure write-up, I still covered only a lot of the higher-level details. For instance, deploying a fault-tolerant, scalable Postgres database could be an article all by itself. I also didn't talk much about the extensive documentation I wrote that, much like my articles in Linux Journal, walks the reader through how to use all of these tools we built.

    As I mentioned at the beginning of this article, this is only an example of an infrastructure design that I found worked well for me with my constraints. Your constraints might be different and might lead to a different design. The goal here is to provide you with one successful approach, so you might be inspired to adapt it to your own needs.

  • A Blunt Reminder About Security for Embedded Computing

    The ICS Advisory (ICSA-19-211-01) released on July 30th by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is chilling to read. According to the documentation, VxWorks is “exploitable remotely” and requires “low skill level to exploit.” Elaborating further, CISA risk assessment concludes, “Successful exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution.”
    The potential consequences of this security breech are astounding to measure, particularly when I look back on my own personal experiences in this space, and now as an Account Executive for Embedded Systems here at SUSE.

    [...]

    At the time, VxWorks was the standard go-to OS in the majority of the embedded production platforms I worked with. It was an ideal way to replace the legacy stove-piped platforms with an Open Architecture (OA) COTS solution. In light of the recent CISA warning, however, it is concerning to know that many of those affected systems processed highly-classified intelligence data at home and abroad.

  • Red Hat Recognized as a Leader by Independent Research Firm in Infrastructure Automation Platforms Evaluation [Ed: Forrester is not “Independent Research Firm”; It’s taking bribes to lie.]
  • Why Red Hat can take over the cloud sooner than you think
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7: Final Full Support Update
  • Transport Layer Security version 1.3 in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

    TLS 1.3 is the sixth iteration of the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol. Originally designed by Netscape in the mid-1990’s to serve the purposes of online shopping, it quickly became the primary security protocol of the Internet. Now not limited just to web browsing, among other things, it secures email transfers, database accesses or business to business communication.

    Because it had its roots in the early days of public cryptography, when public knowledge about securely designing cryptographic protocols was limited, the first two iterations: SSLv2 and SSLv3 are now quite thoroughly broken. The next two iterations, TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 depend on the security of Message Digest 5 (MD5) and Secure Hash Algorithm 1 (SHA1).

  • Cute Qt applications in Fedora Workstation

    Fedora Workstation is all about Gnome and it has been since the beginning, but that doesn’t mean we don’t care about Qt applications, the opposite is true. Many users use Qt applications, even on Gnome, mainly because many KDE/Qt applications don’t have adequate replacement written in Gtk or they are just used to them and don’t really have reason to switch to another one.

    For Qt integration, there is some sort of Gnome support in Qt itself, which includes a platform theme reading Gnome configuration, like fonts and icons. This platform theme also provides native file dialogs, but don’t expect native look of Qt applications. There used to be a gtk2 style, which used gtk calls directly to render natively looking Qt widgets, but it was moved from qtbase to qt5-styleplugins, because it cannot be used today in combination with gtk3.

    For reasons mentioned above, we have been working on a Qt style to make Qt applications look natively in Gnome. This style is named adwaita-qt and from the name you can guess that it makes Qt applications look like Gtk applications with Adwaita style. Adwaita-qt is actually not a new project, it’s been there for years and it was developed by Martin Bříza. Unfortunately, Martin left Red Hat long time ago and since then a new version of Gnome’s Adwaita was released, completely changing colors and made the Adwaita theme look more modern. Being the one who takes care of these things nowadays, I started slowly updating adwaita-qt to make it look like the current Gnome Adwaita theme and voilà, a new version was released after 3 months of intermittent work.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday with Infra

    Friday with Infra is a new event done by CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team, that will help potential contributors to start working on some of the applications we maintain. During this event members of the CPE team will help you to start working on those applications and help you with any issue you may encounter. At the end of this event you should be able to maintain the application by yourself.

SUSE and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • No More Sleepless Nights and Long Weekends Doing Maintenance

    Datacenter maintenance – you dread it, right? Staying up all night to make sure everything runs smoothly and nothing crashes, or possibly losing an entire weekend to maintenance if something goes wrong. Managing your datacenter can be a real drag. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

    At SUSECON 2019, Raine and Stephen discussed how SUSE can help ease your pain with SUSE Manager, a little Salt and a few best practices for datacenter management and automation.

  • Fedora Has Formed A Minimization Team To Work On Shrinking Packaged Software

    The newest initiative within the Fedora camp is a "Minimization Team" seeking to reduce the size of packaged applications, run-times, and other software available on Fedora Linux.

    The hope of the Fedora Minimization Team is that they can lead to smaller containers, eliminating package dependencies where not necessary, and reducing the patching foot-print.

  • DevNation Live: Easily secure your cloud-native microservices with Keycloak

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Keycloak from Sébastien Blanc, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat.

    This tutorial will demonstrate how Keycloak can help you secure your microservices. Regardless of whether it’s a Node.js REST Endpoint, a PHP app, or a Quarkus service, Keycloak is completely agnostic of the technology being used by your services. Learn how to obtain a JWT token and how to propagate this token between your different secured services. We will also explain how to add fine-grained authorizations to these services.

Mesa, ImageMagick, Plasma, Frameworks Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

There have been three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released since last week.

The snapshots brought a single major version update and new versions of KDE’s Plasma and Frameworks.

ImageMagick’s 7.0.8.56 version arrived in snapshot 20190730 and added support for the TIM2 image format, which is commonly used in PlayStation 2 and sometimes in PlayStation Portable games. The snapshot also delivered an update for Mesa 3D Graphics Library with version 19.1.3 that mostly provided fixes for ANV and RADV drivers, as well as NIR backend fixes. File searching tool catfish 1.4.8 provided some fixes with directories and a fix running on Wayland. The GNU Compiler Collection 7 added a patch and fixed for a Link Time Optimization (LTO) linker plugin. The 9.0.1 glu, which is the OpenGL Utility library for Mesa, fixed a possible memory leak. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.2.3; the new version made a few fixes for PowerPC and added Bluetooth for some new devices. Serval Python packages were updated in the snapshot. LLVM tools and libraries were updated in Tumbleweed with llvm8 8.0.1 but the changelog states not to run LLVM tests on PowerPC because of sporadic hangs. The 2.4.7 version of openvpn in the snapshot added support for tls-ciphersuites for TLS 1.3 and updated openvpn.keyring with public key downloaded from https://swupdate.openvpn.net/community/keys/security-key-2019.asc. A lengthy list of fixes were made to the VIM text editor in version 8.1.1741. Other packages updated in the snapshot were ucode-intel 20190618, xapps 1.4.8, ypbind 2.6.1 and zstd 1.4.1. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 79, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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SUSE displaces Red Hat @ Istanbul Technical University

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Red Hat
SUSE

Did you know the third-oldest engineering sciences university in the world is in Turkey? Founded in 1773, Istanbul Technical University (ITU) is one of the oldest universities in Turkey. It trains more than 40,000 students in a wide range of science, technology and engineering disciplines.

The third-oldest engineering sciences university selected the oldest Enterprise Linux company. Awesome match of experience! The university ditched the half-closed/half-open Red Hat products and went for truly open, open source solutions from SUSE.

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GNOME Packages, More Updated in Tumbleweed This Week

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
SUSE

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released since our last Tumbleweed update on Saturday.

The most recent snapshot, 20190723, updated Mozilla Firefox to version 68.0.1. The browser fixed the missing Full-Screen button when watching videos in full screen mode on HBO GO. The new 68 version enhanced the Dark Mode reader view to include darkening the controls, sidebars and toolbars. It also addressed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The snapshot provided an update to GNOME 3.32.4, which fixed an issue that led to some packages with multiple appdata files not correctly showing up on the updates page. The Guile programming language package update to 2.2.6 fixed regression introduced in the previous version that broke HTTP servers locale encoding. Hardware library hwinfo 21.67 fixed Direct Access Storage Devices (DASD) detection. A major 7.0 version of hylafax+ arrived in the snapshot. The Linux Kernel brought several new features with the 5.2.1 kernel and enhanced security for a hardware vulnerability affecting Intel processors. The open-source painting program Krita 4.2.3 version offered a variety of fixes including a copy and paste fix of the animation frames. A few libraries like libgphoto2, libuv and libva received update. There were also several Perl and Rubygem packages that were updated in the snapshot. The file manager for the Xfce Desktop Environment, thunar 1.8.8, fixed XML declaration in uca.xml and the 2.15 transactional-update package enable network during updates and allow updates of the bootloader on EFI systems. The snapshot is currently trending at a 93 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Nils Brauckmann, SUSE's CEO, Steps Down (The first of many goodbyes)

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SUSE

I have recently made the decision to retire as the SUSE CEO and subsequently to leave SUSE. I care very deeply for the SUSE business and its employees, and this difficult decision is based entirely on personal reasons. My step down from the SUSE CEO role will be effective August 5.
My decision comes at a positive point in time for SUSE, where the business has completed its journey to becoming standalone and has a solid foundation to continue to accelerate its success and growth as an independent company.
For me personally this means I will have more time to devote myself to other important things in my life.
In FY18, the SUSE business saw record-breaking revenues. This level of growth has only been realized through the whole SUSE Team showing huge commitment to working together to deliver great outcomes. I am extremely proud of what we have achieved collectively over the last eight years, and I have every confidence that SUSE will exceed all future expectations. I will naturally be following the SUSE journey closely during my retirement, and my positive wishes will always be with the company and all connected with it.
As we look to the future I am delighted and, of course, reassured to be passing the SUSE CEO baton to such a talented and accomplished leader as Melissa Di Donato. Melissa has an outstanding track record of growth, leadership and transformation in the tech sector, having enjoyed enormous success as the chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP. Prior to SAP, she held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contribution to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management.

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KDE Applications, Squid, SQLite, VIM Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots in the middle of this week brought new minor version updates to ImageMagick, Squid, SQLite, VIM and more. The new KDE Applications 19.04.3 version arrived in the first two snapshots.

The more recent snapshot, 20190718, brought a half-dozen new packages, which include fix for the UrbanCode Deploy (UCD) script data for Unicode 10+ scripts for the OpenType text shaping engine package harfbuzz 2.5.3. A two-year old Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) was fixed with the update of libpng12 1.2.59. The tool that cleans RPM spec files, spec-cleaner 1.1.4, added a temporary patch to fix a test that fails if there is no internet connection. Caching proxy squid 4.8 fixed GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 9 build issues and added a fix to prevent parameter parsing used for a potential Denial of Service (DoS). RISC-V support was added with the virt-manager 2.2.1 update and xclock 1.0.9 was also updated in the snapshot, which is trending at a 97 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Meet the GNOMEies: Max Huang

Max Huang has been GNOME since 2010, starting with forming a GNOME users group in Taiwan. Max has a story you may understand: being a user, meeting the right person, and slowly finding yourself more and more deeply involved with a community in terms of working together and making friends. Read more

Review: Raspberry Pi 4

The Raspberry Pi began life as a hacker's dream: a cheap, low-power, highly extendable, hackable PC that shipped as a bare circuit board. Intended as one part educational device, one part tinkering tool, it became something of a phenomenon that has been used to power everything from scaled-down Mars rovers to millions of science and hackday experiments in schools around the world. Read more

Debian: No longer a “Universal” operating system

The Debian project has removed support for the MIPS architecture. This is the latest CPU architecture to be removed from Debian, betraying their tagline of being “The Universal Operating System”.

I take issue not only with their removal of the MIPS architecture, but of their reasoning for doing it.

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today's leftovers

  • Google's Chrome OS 76 Improves Support for Multiple Accounts on Chromebooks

    Google promoted the Chrome OS 76 operating system for supported Chromebook devices to the stable channel, and it is now rolling out to users from around the world with new features and improvements. Based on the latest Google Chrome 76 web browser release, which brings many new features and improvements on its own, Chrome OS 76's probably most exciting is a unified account management for those who use multiple Google accounts on their Chromebook, either by you or if the devices is shared with other people. Users can check out the new account management feature under Settings > Google Accounts, and they should keep in mind that they can now apply all the permissions and access granted to apps, add-ons, websites, Google Play, and in Chrome to all of their signed-in Google accounts. [...] Chrome OS 76 is now rolling out to all supported Chromebook devices. You can update your Chromebook to Chrome OS 76 by going to Chrome settings and accessing the About Chrome OS section. The new version will be automatically downloaded and installed on your Chromebook. A restart is required for Chrome OS 76 to be successfully installed.

  • Netrunner 19.08 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Netrunner 19.08.

  • Asterisk Celebrates 25 Million Downloads

    Sangoma Technologies Corporation (TSX VENTURE: STC), a trusted leader in delivering Unified Communications solutions for SMBs, Enterprises, OEMs, and Service Providers, both on-premises and in the cloud, today announced that September will mark the 25 millionth download of Asterisk, the world's most widely used open source communications software.

  • Mozilla Mornings on the future of EU content regulation

    On 10 September, Mozilla will host the next installment of our EU Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments. The next installment will focus on the future of EU content regulation. We’re bringing together a high-level panel to discuss how the European Commission should approach the mooted Digital Services Act, and to lay out a vision for a sustainable and rights-protective content regulation framework in Europe.

  • FreeIPMI 1.6.4 Released

    o In libfreeipmi, add additional workarounds for packets that are re-ordered during sensor bridging. o In libfreeipmi, add additional sensor / event interpretations. o In libfreeipmi, fix error return value on bridging requests. o Add workaround in ipmi-sel for QuantaPlex T42D-2U motherboard, whichlists a SDR record that makes no sense. o Add workaround for Dell Poweredge FC830, which have an error when reading the last SDR record on a motherboard. o Support Supermicro X10 OEM dimm events.

  • The world’s first mobile phone type crypto digital currency hardware cold wallet officially opened source code

    Recently, the world's first mobile phone type crypto digital asset hardware cold wallet SAFEGEM officially opened source code [...] The cryptography-based blockchain technology is characterized by openness, transparency, and traceability. As an crypto digital asset management system based on blockchain applications, it should have the same characteristics and should have higher security. Therefore, the SAFEGEM development team decided to open up all source code, open source follows the GPL agreement, defines the business boundary, uses open source code for commercial use, and chooses not to open source.

  • Western Digital's Long Trip from Open Standards to Open Source Chips

    It started as a microprocessor pioneer in the 1970s. Now, the company is charting a new course in open source silicon.

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn Go

    Go is a compiled, statically typed programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software. It’s a general purpose programming language with modern features, clean syntax and a robust well-documented common library, making it a good candidate to learn as your first programming language. While it borrows ideas from other languages such as Algol and C, it has a very different character. It’s sometimes described as a simple language. Go is an open source project developed by a team at Google and many contributors from the open source community. Go’s first release was in 2009, and it’s distributed under a BSD-style license. This article selects the best open source books that will give readers a firm foundation in developing Go applications.

  • Corner cases and exception types

    Some unanticipated corner cases with Python's new "walrus" operator—described in our Python 3.8 overview—have cropped up recently. The problematic uses of the operator will be turned into errors before the final release, but just what exception should be raised came into question. It seems that the exception specified in the PEP for the operator may not really be the best choice, as a recent discussion hashed out.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp now used by 1750 CRAN packages

    Since this morning, Rcpp stands at just over 1750 reverse-dependencies on CRAN. The graph on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo, but excluding Suggests) over time. Rcpp was first released in November 2008. It probably cleared 50 packages around three years later in December 2011, 100 packages in January 2013, 200 packages in April 2014, and 300 packages in November 2014. It passed 400 packages in June 2015 (when I tweeted about it), 500 packages in late October 2015, 600 packages in March 2016, 700 packages last July 2016, 800 packages last October 2016, 900 packages early January 2017, 1000 packages in April 2017, 1250 packages in November 2017, and 1500 packages in November 2018. The chart extends to the very beginning via manually compiled data from CRANberries and checked with crandb. The next part uses manually saved entries. The core (and by far largest) part of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of packages using Rcpp is availble too. Also displayed in the graph is the relative proportion of CRAN packages using Rcpp. The four per-cent hurdle was cleared just before useR! 2014 where I showed a similar graph (as two distinct graphs) in my invited talk. We passed five percent in December of 2014, six percent July of 2015, seven percent just before Christmas 2015, eight percent last summer, nine percent mid-December 2016, cracked ten percent in the summer of 2017 and eleven percent in 2018. We are currently at 11.83 percent: a little over one in nine packages. There is more detail in the chart: how CRAN seems to be pushing back more and removing more aggressively (which my CRANberries tracks but not in as much detail as it could), how the growth of Rcpp seems to be slowing somewhat outright and even more so as a proportion of CRAN – just like one would expect a growth curve to.

  • GSoC final report

    The idea of this GSoC project was to implement new Domain-Specific language for LibreOffice to be used in UI testing by logging the user interactions with LO applications then generate the python code needed for the python UI framework which asaswill make testing easier. Also, the project aims to improve the logger that logs all the user interaction to be logged in the new DSL syntax to be more readable. Then we can use this replaying all the user interactions as a UI test.

  • Day 88 [Ed: Karina Passos on her time in KDE GSoC]

    Today, I’ll talk about my GSoC experience and won’t focus so much on Khipu, even because i still have some things to do, so in the next days I’ll publish a post about Khipu and what I’ve done. As I said in the old posts, the begin was the most complicated part for me. I made a project thinking that I’d be able to complete, I started studying the code and the things I’d make many weeks before the start. But I couldn’t understand the code and I think it’s my fault. I even lost three weeks after the start stuck in this situation. It was hard for me, because I was really scared about failing and at the same time dealing with my college stuff, because in Brazil, our summer (and our summer vacation), is in December-February, in July we have a three week vacation, but GSoC lasts three months. I wasn’t having a good time at college as well, but with the help of my therapist and my mentors I found a way to deal with the both things and as everything went well. After this complicated start, to not fail, my mentor suggested that I could change my project. My initial project was to create new features to Khipu and Analitza (Khipu’s main library) to make it a better application and move it out from beta. Then, my new project was to refactor Khipu (using C++ and QML). I was scared because I didn’t know if I’d be able to complete it, but the simplicity of QML helped me a lot, and before the first evaluation (approx. two weeks after I decided my new project) I finished the interface, or at least most of it. [...] And, of course, I’d like to say to KDE, Google and my mentors: thanks for this opportunity.

  • How To Check Your IP Address in Ubuntu [Beginner’s Tip]
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Milestone 2 Released, OpenBenchmarking.org Serves 42 Millionth Download

    The second development release of the forthcoming Phoronix Test Suite 9.0-Asker is now available for testing. Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Milestone 2 continued evolving the brand new result viewer being introduced with PTS 9.0 and various new graphing visualizations. Various fixes and other improvements have landed into this new release. Screenshots and more details on the new result viewing experience soon.