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Mozilla: Rust, Socorro, and 'Healthier' Internet (Openwashing)

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Development
Moz/FF
Web
  • Another Rust-y OS: Theseus joins Redox in pursuit of safer, more resilient systems

    Rust, a modern system programming language focused on performance, safety and concurrency, seems an ideal choice for creating a new operating system, and several such projects already exist. Now there is a new one, Theseus, described by creator Kevin Boos as "an Experiment in Operating System Structure and State Management."

    The key thinking behind Theseus is to avoid what Boos and three other contributors from Rice and Yale universities call "state spill".

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 373
  • Socorro Engineering: Half in Review 2020 h2 and 2020 retrospective

    2020h1 was rough. 2020h2 was also rough: more layoffs, 2 re-orgs, Covid-19.

    I (and Socorro and Tecken) got re-orged into the Data Org. Data Org manages the Telemetry ingestion pipeline as well as all the things related to it. There's a lot of overlap between Socorro and Telemetry and being in the Data Org might help reduce that overlap and ease maintenance.

    [...]

    2020 sucked. At the end, I was feeling completely demoralized and deflated.

  • Reimagine Open: Building a Healthier Internet

    Does the “openness” that made the [Internet] so successful also inevitably lead to harms online? Is an open [Internet] inherently a haven for illegal speech, for eroding privacy and security, or for inequitable access? Is “open” still a useful concept as we chart a future path for the [Internet]?

    A new paper from Mozilla seeks to answer these questions. Reimagine Open: Building Better Internet Experiences explores the evolution of the open [Internet] and the challenges it faces today. The report catalogs findings from a year-long project of outreach led by Mozilla’s Chairwoman and CEO, Mitchell Baker. Its conclusion: We need not break faith with the values embedded in the open [Internet]. But we do need to return to the original conceptions of openness, now eroded online. And we do need to reimagine the open [Internet], to address today’s need for accountability and online health.

Mozilla: Firefox Nightly, Thunderbird, and VPN

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Moz/FF
  • Improving Cross-Browser Testing, Part 2: New Automation Features in Firefox Nightly - Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog

    In our previous blog post about the web testing ecosystem, we described the tradeoffs involved in automating the browser via the HTTP-based WebDriver standard versus DevTools protocols such as Chrome DevTools Protocol (CDP). Although there are benefits to WebDriver’s HTTP-based approach, we know there are many developers who find the additional functionality and ergonomics of CDP-based test tools compelling.

    It’s clear that WebDriver needs to grow to meet the capabilities of DevTools-based automation. However, that process will take time, and we want more developers to be able to run their automated tests in Firefox today.

    To that end, we have shipped an experimental implementation of parts of CDP in Firefox Nightly, specifically targeting the use cases of end-to-end testing using Google’s Puppeteer, and the CDP-based features of Selenium 4.

    For users looking to use CDP tooling with stable releases of Firefox, we are currently going through the process to enable the feature on release channels and we hope to make this available as soon as possible.

    The remainder of this post will look at the details of how to use Firefox with CDP-based tools.

  • New in Thunderbird 78.0

    I use Evolution for work mail, for psychological separation, but also for Exchange support, and I have to say: Thunderbird is just much easier to use, in that you can customize it into whatever you want from a client. I’m genuinely shocked people prefer web mail interfaces to something more robust, like Thunderbird.

  • Think you don’t need a VPN? Here are five times you just might.

    Have you ever connected to a hotspot called something like C0MCAST-WiFi-77th-St or Verizon3-Hotspot-Baltimore? Looks legit, right? Not so fast. In reality, anyone can set up a phony public WiFi with a legitimate sounding name to lure people to use it. Connecting to any unknown WiFi makes you an easy target for creeps and criminals who want to access your device to steal private information, install malware or worse. Mozilla VPN can boost your security any time you’re connected to a public WiFi by blocking unknown entities from seeing private data that travels from your phone or laptop. This goes for connecting to WiFi networks at coffee shops, stores, doctor’s offices and so on.

  • Mozilla VPN is Now Available to Mac & Linux Users - OMG! Ubuntu!

    Mozilla VPN now supports Mac and Linux. The subscription-based privacy service launched in 2020 but only for Windows, Android and iOS.

  • Mozilla brings its VPN to Mac and Linux

Firefox – we’re finally getting HW acceleration on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

Firefox 84.0 is a big milestone for Firefox Linux development as it comes with HW acceleration by default for some Linux users. Stock Mozilla Firefox 84.0 enables WebRender (HW accelerated backend) for Gnome/X.org and Gnome/Wayland will be supported in Firefox 85.0. Fedora is bit ahead and enables WebRender for Gnome/Wayland in Firefox 84.0 too.

WebRender by default is restricted to AMD/Linux graphics cards as NVIDIA is known for various issues – both proprietary and Noveau drivers.

And why it’s enabled in Gnome only for now? For instance KDE is also a popular desktop environment. I think it’s because Gnome utilizes HW acceleration so when Gnome works on your box there’s assumption that Firefox will work too. KDE provides choices how to disable/restrict HW acceleration setup (for instance it supports disabled screen compositing) and it’s more difficult to cover various scenarios.

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Also: Mozilla No Longer Supports A Free Internet

Firefox 86 Will Support Next-Gen Image Format by Default

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Moz/FF

A bug report shows Mozilla devs plan to ship Firefox 86, due in February 2020, with AVIF image support by default. AVIF images used on websites and web services will load in-page just like other supported image formats.

But what is AVIF?

AVIF is a free, lightweight, and highly optimised image compression format based on the AV1 video codec. AVIF images are up to 50% smaller in size (so they load faster) but are visually comparable to JPEG and other image compression formats in most instances.

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Mozilla Firefox Flips On AVIF Image Decoding By Default

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Moz/FF
Web

As noted before the holidays that Mozilla Firefox was ready to enable AVIF image decoding by default, now that the holidays have passed and developers back to their keyboards, Firefox today has re-enabled AVIF by default.

Since Google's Chrome 85 there has been AVIF support enabled by default while the Firefox support has been disabled by default for now. But as of today in their nightly code the functionality is there out-of-the-box.

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Also: We need more than deplatforming

The first fully tested Fedora Firefox package

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Red Hat
Moz/FF

We hit a big milestone in Firefox deployment on Fedora with firefox-84.0.2 package. It’s the first fully tested Firefox package released to Fedora users. Let’s see what’s so exciting on it.

Mozilla has a large testsuite as a part of development and release process. When any new patch hits Firefox repository, it’s built and tested for functional and speed regressions. The testsuite is also a developers nightmare as it contains some old and outdated test environments and it may be difficult to pass patches through it.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Encrypted Client Hello: the future of ESNI in Firefox

    Two years ago, we announced experimental support for the privacy-protecting Encrypted Server Name Indication (ESNI) extension in Firefox Nightly. The Server Name Indication (SNI) TLS extension enables server and certificate selection by transmitting a cleartext copy of the server hostname in the TLS Client Hello message. This represents a privacy leak similar to that of DNS, and just as DNS-over-HTTPS prevents DNS queries from exposing the hostname to on-path observers, ESNI attempts to prevent hostname leaks from the TLS handshake itself.

    Since publication of the ESNI draft specification at the IETF, analysis has shown that encrypting only the SNI extension provides incomplete protection. As just one example: during session resumption, the Pre-Shared Key extension could, legally, contain a cleartext copy of exactly the same server name that is encrypted by ESNI. The ESNI approach would require an encrypted variant of every extension with potential privacy implications, and even that exposes the set of extensions advertised. Lastly, real-world use of ESNI has exposed interoperability and deployment challenges that prevented it from being enabled at a wider scale.

  • 33 hardware and firmware vulnerabilities: A guide to the threats | CSO Online

    Meltdown and Spectre raised the alarm over vulnerabilities that attackers can exploit in popular hardware and its firmware. Here's a roundup of the ones that present the most significant threats.

  • 6 Open Source Tools for Your Security Team

    Open source tools are a fact of life in application development. A growing number of open source security tools makes the noncommercial license a realistic option for more security teams.

    Traditionally, open source tools have been viewed as options for academic institutions and smaller companies. But current-generation open source tools, developed with an emphasis on scale and deployment flexibility, have been developed with larger enterprises in mind.

    Dark Reading looked at a range of tools and system across the open source landscape to find a half-dozen that enterprise security teams will want to know about. Several are at the beginning of their product lives; one is at the end, though it is still useful. In most cases, these tools compete against commercial offerings, though in every case the open source option provides qualities (aside from purchase price) that make them worthy of consideration for specific situations.

Mozilla: Security, HTML, Standardizing Principles and More

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Moz/FF
  • Why getting voting right is hard, Part III: Optical Scan

    This is the third post in my series on voting systems. For background see part I. As described in part II, hand-counted paper ballots have a number of attractive security and privacy properties but scale badly to large elections. Fortunately, we can count paper ballots efficiently using optical scanners (opscan). This will be familiar to anyone who has taken paper-based standardized tests: instead of just checking a box, next to each choice there is a region (typically an oval) to fill in, as shown in the examples below These ballots can then be machine read using an optical scanner which reports the result totals.

    [...]

    So far in this series I’ve talked about paper ballots as if they are cast at the polling place, but that doesn’t have to be the case. They can just as easily be sent to voters who return them by mail. Depending on the situation this is referred to as “vote by mail” (VBM) or “absentee ballots”. VBM brings some special challenges which I’ll be covering in my next post.

  • Martin Thompson: RFCs in HTML

    I spend a shocking amount of my time staring at IETF documents, both Internet-Drafts and RFCs. I have spend quite a bit of time looking at GitHub README files and W3C specifications.

    For reading prose, the format I routinely find to be the most accessible is the text versions. This is definitely not based on the quality of the writing, all of these formats produce unreadable documents. What I refer to here is not the substance, but the form. That is, how the text is laid out on my screen[1].

    There is clearly a degree of familiarization and bias involved in this. A little while ago, I worked out that there is just one thing that elevates that clunky text format above the others: line length.

  • Standardizing Principles

    There is a perennial question in standards development about the value of the different artefacts that the process kicks out.

    One subject that remains current is the relative value of specifications against things like compliance testing frameworks. Reasonable people tend to place different weight on tests, with a wide range of attitudes. In the past, more people were willing to reject attempts to invest in any shared test or compliance infrastructure.

    In recent years however, it has become very clear that a common test infrastructure is critical to developing a high quality standard. Developing tests in conjunction with the standardization effort has improved the quality of specifications and implementations a great deal.

    Recently, I encountered an example where a standards group deliberately chose not to document behaviour, relying exclusively on the common test framework. Understanding what is lost when this

  • Aaron Klotz at Mozilla: 2018 Roundup: Q2, Part 2

    One of the things I added to Firefox for Windows was a new process called the “launcher process.” “Bootstrap process” would be a better name, but we already used the term “bootstrap” for our XPCOM initialization code. Instead of overloading that term and adding potential confusion, I opted for using “launcher process” instead.

    The launcher process is intended to be the first process that runs when the user starts Firefox. Its sole purpose is to create the “real” browser process in a suspended state, set various attributes on the browser process, resume the browser process, and then self-terminate.

    In bug 1454745 I implemented an initial skeletal (and opt-in) implementation of the launcher process for starting.

    This seems like pretty straightforward code, right? Naïvely, one could just rip a CreateProcess sample off of MSDN and call it day. The code is a bit more complicated than that, for various reasons, which I will outline in the following sections.

Rust 1.49.0 Released and Related News

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
  • Announcing Rust 1.49.0

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.49.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 371
  • Niko Matsakis: The more things change… [Ed: Rust language is becoming GAFAM surveillance monopolies, hosted on Microsoft servers]

    That said, I’ve talked to a number of people in the Rust community who feel nervous about this change. After all, we’ve worked hard to build an open source organization that values curiosity, broad collaboration, and uplifting others. As more companies form Rust teams, there’s a chance that some of that could be lost, even if everyone has the best of intentions. While we all want to see more people paid to work on Rust, that can also result in “part time” contributors feeling edged out.

    [...]

    I want to zoom out a bit to the broader picture. As I said in the intro, we are entering a new phase for Rust, one where there are multiple active Rust teams at different companies, all working as part of the greater Rust community to build and support Rust. This is something to celebrate. I think it will go a long way towards making Rust development more sustainable for everyone.

    Even as we celebrate, it’s worth recognizing that in many ways this exciting future is already here. Supporting Rust doesn’t require forming a full-time Rust team. The Google Fuchsia team, for example, has always made a point of not only using Rust but actively contributing to the community. Ferrous Microsystems has a number of folks who work within the Rust compiler and embedded teams. In truth, there are a lot of employers who give their employees time to work on Rust – way too many to list, even if I knew all their names. Then we have companies like Embark and others that actively fund work on their dependencies (shout-out to cargo-fund, an awesome tool developed by the equally awesome azfoltzer, who – as it happens – works at Fastly, another company that has been an active supporter of Rust).

Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Scammers use Chrome, Firefox extensions in widespread ad fraud campaign

    The scammers are using malicious browser extensions— a tried and tested fraud tactic — to inject bogus advertisements into the results displayed on a search engine page. The more users who visit the fraudulent ad pages, the more money the perpetrators earn via a traffic-driven advertising program. Microsoft did not identify who was responsible for the attacks, or how much money they had netted.

  • Firefox Browser updated to 84.0.1 [in] PCLinuxOS

    The Mozilla Firefox browser has been updated to 84.0.1 and is a minor bug fix update. This update will appear in your Synaptic Package Manager if you are using Firefox.

  • David Humphrey: SnowyOwls.ca

    But as the snow begins to fall each December, my attention turns to another owl: the Snowy Owl. Normally at this time of year I'm seeing Snowy Owls on my long commutes to and from work. With COVID, I'm not out driving anymore, and as such, I'm not having as easy a time finding them.

    I decided that this year's marking-side-project would be a tool to help people find Snowy Owls near where they live. I've long wanted to play with eBird and the eBird API, and hoped that I could get recent sighting data this way. To use the eBird API, you have to create an account and then request an API key. After that you can do all sorts of interesting queries to get current or historical data about sightings by species, region, or location.

    [...]

    As we enter our tenth month of the pandemic, I wanted to make something for the current moment. Christmas won't be the same this year: we won't be able to celebrate or visit our parents, siblings, or their families; I can't get together with any friends for a meal; and many of the usual traditions our family has are off the table. I'm sad at all of it.

    I can't fix any of this, but I wanted to do something to give some small bit of joy over the holidays. While the pandemic forces us to avoid each other, we're still allowed to go outside, to drive in the country, to walk in the park or along the shoreline, and to look for Snowy Owls.

    As I was finishing up the app's code, I noticed that a new owl had been spotted 15 minutes from our house. My wife and I drove off into the falling snow in search of it, creeping along an old fence line stretched across a farmer's field. It was really beautiful to be out, to be hopeful, and to be focused on what is yet to come.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Parler Tricks: Making Software Disappear

    Much has been written and broadcast about the recent actions from Google and Apple to remove the Parler app from their app stores. Apps get removed from these app stores all the time, but more than almost any past move by these companies, this one has brought the power Big Tech companies wield over everyone’s lives to the minds of every day people. Journalists have done a good job overall in presenting the challenges and concerns with this move, as well as addressing the censorship and anti-trust issues at play. If you want a good summary of the issues, I found Cory Doctorow’s post on the subject a great primer. [...] This is part of the article where Android users feel smug. After all, while much more of their data gets captured and sold than on iOS, in exchange they still (sometimes) have the option of rooting their phones and (sometimes) “sideloading” applications (installing applications outside of Google’s App Store). If Google bans an app, all a user has to do is follow a list of complicated (and often sketchy) procedures, sometimes involving disabling protections or installing sketchy software on another computer, and they can wrench back a bit of control over their phones. Of course in doing so they are disabling security features that are the foundation for the rest of Android security, at which point many Android security experts will throw up their hands and say “you’re on your own.” [...] The Librem 5 phone runs the same PureOS operating system as Librem laptops, and it features the PureOS Store which provides a curated list of applications known to work well on the phone’s screen. Even so, you can use the search function to find the full list of all available software in PureOS. After all, you might want that software to be available when you dock your Librem 5 to a larger screen. We aim to provide software in the PureOS store that respects people’s freedom, security, and privacy and will audit software that’s included in the store with that in mind. That way people have a convenient way to discover software that not only works well on the phone but also respects them. Yet you are still free to install any third-party software outside of the PureOS Store that works on the phone, even if it’s proprietary software we don’t approve of.

  • Apple Mulls Podcast Subscription Push Amid Spotify's Land Grab

    The talks, first reported by The Information, have been ongoing since at least last fall, sources tell to The Hollywood Reporter, and ultimately could end up taking several different forms. Regardless, it’s clear that Tim Cook-led Apple — after spending the last two years watching rival-in-music-streaming Spotify invest hundreds of millions of dollars to align itself with some of the most prolific producers and most popular personalities in podcasting — is no longer content sitting on the sideline. “There’s a huge opportunity sitting under their nose with 1.4 million iOS devices globally,” says Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives, “and they don’t want to lose out.” Apple declined to comment about its podcasting plans.

    Much of the growth of the podcasting industry over the last decade can be traced back to Apple and its former CEO Steve Jobs, who in 2005 declared that he was “bringing podcasting mainstream” by adding support for the medium to iTunes. A few years later, the company introduced a separate Podcasts app that quickly became the leading distribution platform for the medium. But Apple, which netted $275 billion in sales in fiscal 2020, has refrained from turning podcasting — still a relatively small industry that the Interactive Advertising Bureau estimated would bring in nearly $1 billion in U.S. advertising revenue last year — into a moneymaking venture.

  • Blacks In Technology and The Linux Foundation Partner to Offer up to $100,000 in Training & Certification to Deserving Individuals [Ed: Linux Foundation exploits blacks for PR, even though it does just about nothing for blacks [1, 2]]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and The Blacks In Technology Foundation, the largest community of Black technologists globally, today announced the launch of a new scholarship program to help more Black individuals get started with an IT career. Blacks in Technology will award 50 scholarships per quarter to promising individuals. The Linux Foundation will provide each of these recipients with a voucher to register for any Linux Foundation administered certification exam at no charge, such as the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate, Certified Kubernetes Administrator, Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator and more. Associated online training courses will also be provided at no cost when available for the exam selected. Each recipient will additionally receive one-on-one coaching with a Blacks In Technology mentor each month to help them stay on track in preparing for their exam.

  • the tragedy of gemini

    While everything I have seen served via Gemini is friendly and sociable, the technical barriers of what-is-a-command-line and how-do-I-use-one are a fence put up that keep out the riffraff. Certainly, you can walk around the corner and go through the gate, but ultimately the geminiverse is lovely because it is underpopulated, slower-paced, and literate. It is difficult enough to access that those who can use it can be welcoming without worrying its smallness will be compromised.

    The tragedy is that I don’t think many of its denizens would claim that they only want to hear from technical, educated people, but in order to use a small [Internet], an August [Internet], they have let the fence keep out anyone else.

Devices: GigaIPC, Raspberry Pi, and Arduino Projects

  • Rugged systems provide IP67 waterproofing

    GigaIPC unveiled two compact, IP67-protected “QBix-WP” computers with Linux support and rugged M12 ports for 2x LAN, 3x COM, GPIO, and 9-36V input: one with 8th Gen Whiskey Lake and the other with Apollo Lake. Taiwan-based GigaIPC has announced a “QBiX-WP Series” of rugged embedded systems with IP67 protections: an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake based QBiX-WP-WHLA8265H-A1 and an Apollo Lake powered QBiX-WP-APLA3940H-A1. IP67 provides level 6 “dust-tight” protection against dust ingression and level 7 waterproofing against liquid ingress including immersion at up to 1 meter for 30 minutes.

  • Deter burglars with a Raspberry Pi chatbot
  • Arduino Blog » 3D-printed mobile robot platform based on the Arduino Due

    Although an Arduino can be a great way to provide computing power for a mobile robot platform, you’ll need a variety of other electronics and mechanical components to get it going. In his write-up, computer science student Niels Post outlines how he constructed a robot that travels via two stepper motors, along with casters to keep it upright. The round chassis is 3D-printed and runs on three rechargeable 18650 batteries.

  • Arduino Blog » Making your own Segway, the Arduino way

    After obtaining motors from a broken wheelchair, this father-son duo went to work turning them into a new “Segway.” The device is controlled by an Arduino Uno, along with a pair of motor drivers implemented handle the device’s high current needs. An MPU-6050 allows it to react as the rider leans forward and backwards, moving with the help of a PID loop. Steering is accomplished via a potentiometer, linked to a bent-pipe control stick using a bottle cap and glue.

Programming: PureScript, C++, Lua, and Raku

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn PureScript - LinuxLinks

    PureScript is a small strongly, statically typed programming language with expressive types, written in and inspired by Haskell, and compiling to Javascript. It can be used to develop web applications, server side apps, and also desktop applications with use of Electron.

  • C++ Operator Overloading – Linux Hint

    This article provides a guide to operator overloading in C++. Operator overloading is a useful and powerful feature of the C++ programming language. C++ allows overloading of most built-in operators. In this tutorial, we will use several examples to demonstrate the operator overloading mechanism. [...] The C++ language allows programmers to give special meanings to operators. This means that you can redefine the operator for user-defined data types in C++. For example, “+” is used to add built-in data types, such as int, float, etc. To add two types of user-defined data, it is necessary to overload the “+” operator.

  • Lua, a misunderstood language

    Lua is one of my favourite programming languages. I’ve used it to build a CMS for my old educational website, for creating cool IoT hardware projects, for building little games, and experimenting with network decentralisation. Still, I don’t consider myself an expert on it at all, I am at most a somewhat competent user. This is to say that I have had exposure to it in various contexts and through many years but I am not deep into its implementation or ecosystem. Because of that, it kinda pains me when I read blog posts and articles about Lua that appear to completely miss the objective and context of the language. Usually these posts read like a rant or a list of demands. Most recently, I saw a post about Lua’s Lack of Batteries on LWN and a discussion about that post on Hacker News that made me want to write back. In this post I’ll address some of the comments I’ve seen on that original article and on Hacker News.

  • A Complete Course of the Raku programming language

    This course covers all the main aspects of the language that you need to use in your daily practice. The course consists of five parts that explain the theory and offer many practical assignments. It is assumed that you try solving the tasks yourself before looking to the solution.

    If you’re only starting to learn Raku, you are advised to go through all the parts in the order they are listed in the table of contents. If you have some practice and you want to have some specific training, you are welcome to start with the desired section.

Software: Trakt Scrobbler, GIMP, and More

  • Sync mpv, VLC, Plex And MPC-BE/MPC-HC With Trakt.tv Using Trakt Scrobbler

    Trakt Scrobbler is a Trakt.tv scrobbler for Linux, macOS and Windows, which supports VLC, MPV, MPC-BE/MPC-HC and Plex (doesn't require a Plex Pass). The tool is controlled from the command line. After the initial setup, Trakt Scrobbler runs in the background, monitoring what's playing (movies / TV show episodes) in the media players you configure, and sending this information to Trakt.tv. It also displays optional desktop notifications when scrobbling begins and ends

  • [PPA Update] GIMP 2.10.22 with Python Script Support in Ubuntu 18.04

    For Ubuntu 18.04 users sticking to the PPA build of GIMP image editor 2.10.22, now the Python Script support is back. Since old GTK2 and Python 2 libraries being removed from Ubuntu universe repositories, the Python script support was excluded due to lack of dependencies when I was uploading the GIMP packages into PPA. Ubuntu 18.04 was neglected, though. It meets all the dependencies to build the requested feature. So I added it back. Hope it’s not too late for you :). And the package was totally built via the rules from otto-kesselgulasch’s PPA.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Kdenlive 20.12.1, BleachBit 4.2.0 & LibreOffice 7.1 RC - OMG! Ubuntu!

    I’m keen to get back into the habit of posting Linux release roundups. The last one I wrote was way back in 2019 — so it’s been a while! [...] Well, open source and Linux-focused development never stops. App, tool, kernel, driver, distro, and framework updates pop out each and every week. Not all of these updates are what you’d call ‘substantial’ or ‘must-read’ news. Point releases, for instance, are difficult to “pad out” into a full length article (much less sound like one you’d want to read about). I’m loathe to start firing out 8 short posts a day on thin topics. It clogs up your feed reader and pushes genuinely interesting content off the main page. Hence the roundups. I get the satisfaction of being able to cover the “lite” news items I normally skip (and mention distro releases I might not normally be able to), and you get the satisfaction of knowing you’re missing out on even less stuff. Keen to see what meaty chunks are threaded on this week’s skewer? Read on…