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Moz/FF

Latest From Mozilla and Chrome 76 Beta

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Google
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Updated GPG key for signing Firefox Releases

    The GPG key used to sign the Firefox release manifests is expiring soon, and so we’re going to be switching over to new key shortly.

    The new GPG subkey’s fingerprint is 097B 3130 77AE 62A0 2F84 DA4D F1A6 668F BB7D 572E, and it expires 2021-05-29.

  • Happy BMO Push Day!
  • Extensions in Firefox 68

    In Firefox 68, we are introducing a new API and some enhancements to webRequest and private browsing. We’ve also fixed a few issues in order to improve compatibility and resolve issues developers were having with Firefox.

  • Chrome 76 Beta: dark mode, payments, new PWA features and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Find more information about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 76 is beta as of June 13, 2019.

  • Chrome 76 Beta Brings Dark Mode Media Query, Other Improvements

    Following last week's release of Chrome 75, Google today issued the first public beta for the Chrome 76 web-browser. 

    The Chrome 76 browser now supports the "prefers-color-scheme" media query that can be used if wanting to implement a dark mode for a web-site to match any dark theme/mode of the device / operating system.

7 Reasons Why Firefox Is My Favorite Web Browser

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Moz/FF

Here are 7 Reasons why Firefox is my favorite web browser to use. This is an opinion video and I don’t expect everyone agree with me but these are some of the reasons that I prefer to use Firefox over any other browser. There are many other reasons but I had to draw a line somewhere.

Read more

Also: Mozilla Changes The Iconic Firefox Logo To Reflect Its Broader Approach

Mozilla Firefox 67.0.2 Released with Various Improvements and Bug Fixes

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Moz/FF

Mozilla released today the second maintenance update to the latest Firefox 67 "Quantum" web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
Firefox 67.0.2 is now available, a bugfix and stability release that addresses several issues reported by users lately, including a crash with Apple's upcoming macOS Catalina 10.15 operating system, the ability to start two simultaneous downloads via < a download >, and a performance regression for Eclipse Remote Application Platform (RAP) apps.

On Linux systems, users are now able to easily install and use additional language packs using the built-in Preferences UI. On both Linux or macOS systems, Firefox users can now start the web browser in safe mode without it believing that the user profile is too recent on the subsequent launch to be used with the current version of Firefox.

Read more

Also: Mozilla to launch Firefox Premium

Browsers: Firefox Upselling and Branding, Chromium-Based Browsers Will Ignore Google’s Ad-Blocking Ban

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • This Free software ain't free to make, pal, it's expensive: Mozilla to bankroll Firefox with paid-for premium extras

    Mozilla is planning to launch a suite of paid-for subscription services to complement its free and open-source Firefox browser in October.

    CEO Chris Beard elaborated on the plan, mentioned in the company's bug reporting system eleven months ago, to German technology site T3N last week. In an interview, he said Mozilla's premium service plan will include VPN bandwidth above what's available from Mozilla's ProtonMail VPN partnership.

    He suggested the arrangement will augment a free VPN tier. That would be a change from the current $10 per month ProtonMail VPN arrangement, one that resembles the free VPN offering from the competing Opera browser. He also suggested the service bundle will include an allotment of secure cloud storage, though it isn't yet clear how much storage will be included or whether "secure" means user-held encryption keys.

  • Firefox 68 Beta 10 Testday, June 14th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, June 14th we are organizing Firefox 68 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Sync & Firefox Account and Browser notifications & prompts.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

  • Mozilla Open Design Blog: Firefox: The Evolution Of A Brand

    Consider the fox. It’s known for being quick, clever, and untamed — attributes easily applied to its mythical cousin, the “Firefox” of browser fame. Well, Firefox has another trait not found in earthly foxes: stretchiness. (Just look how it circumnavigates the globe.) That fabled flexibility now enables Firefox to adapt once again to a changing environment.

    The “Firefox” you’ve always known as a browser is stretching to cover a family of products and services united by putting you and your privacy first. Firefox is a browser AND an encrypted service to send huge files. It’s an easy way to protect your passwords on every device AND an early warning if your email has been part of a data breach. Safe, private, eye-opening. That’s just the beginning of the new Firefox family.

    Now Firefox has a new look to support its evolving product line. Today we’re introducing the Firefox parent brand — an icon representing the entire family of products. When you see it, it’s your invitation to join Firefox and gain access to everything we have to offer. That includes the famous Firefox Browser icon for desktop and mobile, and even that icon is getting an update to be rolled out this fall.

  • Chromium-Based Browsers Will Ignore Google’s Ad-Blocking Ban

    Brave Opera and Vivaldi will not implement Google’s changes that will cripple ad-blockers.

    Commercial web browsers including Brave, Opera, and Vivaldi won’t be disabling ad blocker extensions as desired by Google. These browsers are based on the the same open source codebase that is used with Google Chrome. Google maintains an open source project called Chromium as the base of its Chrome browsers.

    According to ZDnet, “At the end of May, Google made a new announcement in which it said that the old technology that ad blockers were relying on would only be available for Chrome enterprise users, but not for regular users.”

Mozilla: Firefox Desktop Telemetry, NN at the Federal Communications Commission and These Weeks in Firefox

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Moz/FF
  • Data Science is Hard: Validating Data for Glean

    Glean is a new library for collecting data in Mozilla products. It’s been shipping in Firefox Preview for a little while and I’d like to take a minute to talk about how I validated that it sends what we think it’s sending.

    Validating new data collections in an existing system like Firefox Desktop Telemetry is a game of comparing against things we already know. We know that some percentage of data we receive is just garbage: bad dates, malformed records, attempts at buffer overflows and SQL injection. If the amount of garbage in the new collection is within the same overall amount of garbage we see normally, we count it as “good enough” and move on.

    [...]

    At this point, aside from the “metrics” ping which is awaiting validation after some fixes reach saturation in the population, Glean has passed all of these criteria acceptably. It still has a bit of a duplicate ping problem, but its clock skew and latency are much lower than Firefox Desktop’s. There are some outrageous clients sending dozens of pings over a period that they should be sending a handful, but that might just be a test client whose values will disappear into the noise when the user population grows.

  • It’s time for the US Senate to Save the Net

    On the one year anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of net neutrality, Mozilla is joining millions of people across the internet to once again stand up to protect the open internet.

    When the FCC gutted net neutrality protections last year, we filed our lawsuit because we believed that repeal was unlawful. We also believed taking on the FCC was the right thing to do for the future of the internet and everyone who uses it.

    Until the Senate listens to the American people and protects the open Internet, Mozilla v. FCC continues to be net neutrality’s best hope.

    But it’s time our Senators do what they were elected to do – represent their constituents, and pass net neutrality legislation that has overwhelming support and protects Americans. With a victory in the courts, or bipartisan legislation, we can ensure that people – and not big cable and telephone companies – get to choose what they see and do online.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 59

Mozilla: Privacy, Focus and the Mozilla Reps Community

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox starts blocking third-party cookies by default
  • Firefox adds tracking protection by default

    The Mozilla blog announces a new Firefox feature...

  • Indicating focus to improve accessibility

    Focus indicators make the difference between day and night for people who rely on them. Let’s first look at what they are, and which people find them useful.

    Focus is something that happens between the interactive elements on a page. That’s the first thing you should know. (See the focusable elements compatibility table for a more detailed and nuanced definition.) Interactive elements are elements like links, buttons and form fields: things that users can interact with.

  • Mozilla Reps Community: New Council members – 2019 Spring elections

    In more detail here are the subjects that they will work on:

    Mayur Patil: Campaigns engagement and Newsletter work
    Yuliana Jimenez: improving the onboarding experience
    Prathamesh Chavan: Reaching out to external entities
    Shahid Farooqui: Reps value proposition
    Irvin Chen: will continue his work on bridging the local communities with the program

Privacy Charm Offensive From Mozilla and Firefox Team

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Moz/FF
  • Technology with respect and honesty. Here’s how we do it.

    Tech companies are using the word “privacy” a lot these days. What do they mean when they say it? To one company, privacy means keeping your information between you and your device. To another, it means knowing who in your social network can see the stuff you post. And to a third, it’s just a setting you can toggle while using their services. They all want you to think they can be trusted.

    Let’s be clear: the business success of many of these companies depends on using our personal information as their currency. The details of our lives fuel their growth. Like greenwashing, pretending to care about privacy doesn’t solve the underlying problem. It just muddies the truth.

    Here’s what we mean when we use the word “privacy”: we will never sell what little personal info we have about you. Our business doesn’t depend on abusing your trust. In fact, respecting your privacy is at the core of every Firefox product, and the heart of our mission.

  • Five ways joining Firefox can keep you safer and smarter online

    The word “privacy” gets thrown around a lot these days, but every tech company defines privacy differently. Respecting your privacy has been at our core from day one, with the Firefox Personal Data Promise baked into everything we make. Everyone who uses our products — from the browser and beyond — gets powerful privacy protection, and when you join Firefox, you get even more features.

  • Firefox Now Available with Enhanced Tracking Protection by Default Plus Updates to Facebook Container, Firefox Monitor and Lockwise

    It’s been several weeks since I was promoted to Senior Vice President of Firefox, responsible for overall Firefox product and web platform development. As a long-time employee with 10+ years, I’ve seen a lot of things within the tech industry from data breaches, net neutrality and the rise and fall of tech companies. I believe that Firefox has and will continue to make a big impact in building the necessary protections to keep people safe online.

    This past year, we’ve seen tech companies talk a big game about privacy as they’re realizing that, after several global scandals, people feel increasingly vulnerable. It’s unfortunate that this shift had to happen in order for tech companies to take notice. At Firefox, we’re doing more than that. We believe that in order to truly protect people, we need to establish a new standard that puts people’s privacy first. At Firefox, we have been working on setting this standard by offering privacy-related features, like Tracking Protection in Private Browsing, long before these issues were brought to light. With this new, increased awareness for privacy, we feel that the time is right for the next step in stronger online protections for everyone.

    Last year, we announced our new approach to anti-tracking, and our commitment to help people stay safe whenever they used Firefox. One of those initiatives outlined was to block cookies from known third party trackers in Firefox. Today, Firefox will be rolling out this feature, Enhanced Tracking Protection, to all new users on by default, to make it harder for over a thousand companies to track their every move. Additionally, we’re updating our privacy-focused features including an upgraded Facebook Container extension, a Firefox desktop extension for Lockwise, a way to keep their passwords safe across all platforms, and Firefox Monitor’s new dashboard to manage multiple email addresses.

  • The Mozilla Blog: When it comes to privacy, default settings matter!

    What if I told you that on nearly every single website you visit, data about you was transmitted to dozens or even hundreds of companies, all so that the website could earn an additional $0.00008 per ad! This is a key finding from a new study on behaviorally targeted advertisements from Carnegie Mellon University and it should be a wake-up call to all of us. The status quo of pervasive data collection in service of ad targeting is untenable. That is why we’re announcing some key changes to Firefox.

    Today marks an important milestone in the history of Firefox and the web. As of today, for new users who download and install Firefox for the first time, Enhanced Tracking Protection will automatically be set on by default, protecting our users from the pervasive tracking and collection of personal data by ad networks and tech companies.

    It seems that each week a new tech company decides to decree that privacy is a human right. They tout how their products provide people with “choices” to change the settings if they wish to opt into a greater level of privacy protection to exemplify how they are putting privacy first. That begs the question — do people really want more complex settings to understand and fiddle with or do they simply want products that respect their privacy and align with their expectations to begin with?

  • The Mozilla Blog: The web the world needs can be ours again, if we want it

    People everywhere are demanding basic consumer protections. We want our food to be healthy to eat, our water to be clean to drink, and our air to be safe to breathe.

    This year people have started to demand more of the internet as well, however, there persists an expectation that on the internet people are responsible for protecting themselves.

    You should not have to worry about trading privacy and control in order to enjoy the technology you love. Tech companies have put the onus on people to read through their opaque terms and conditions tied to your data and privacy to use their services. The average privacy policy from a tech company is thousands of words and written at a level that often requires legal training to interpret. As such the vast majority of people don’t bother to read, and just click through these agreements trusting that the companies have their interests at heart.

    This isn’t right, and it’s not where we stand. We aspire to put people back in control of their connected lives. To better equip people to navigate the internet today, we’ve built the latest version of our flagship Firefox browser with Enhanced Tracking Protection on by default. These protections work in the background, blocking third-parties from tracking your online activity while increasing the speed of the browser.

    We’re offering privacy protections by default as you navigate the web because the business model of the web is broken, with more and more intrusive personal surveillance becoming the norm. While we hope that people’s digital rights and freedoms will ultimately be guaranteed, we’re here to help in the interim.

  • Firefox Now Will Have Enhanced Tracking Protection On by Default, 5.0 Kernel Reaches End of Life, Apple Replacing Bash with zsh as Default Shell, IBM Announces Major Upgrade to Db2 and Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel R5 Update 2 Is Now Available

    Mozilla today announces that the Firefox browser will now have Enhanced Tracking Protection on by default. From Chris Beard's blog post: "These protections work in the background, blocking third-parties from tracking your online activity while increasing the speed of the browser. We're offering privacy protections by default as you navigate the web because the business model of the web is broken, with more and more intrusive personal surveillance becoming the norm. While we hope that people's digital rights and freedoms will ultimately be guaranteed, we're here to help in the interim."

  • Firefox 68 Beta 6 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday May 31st – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 68 Beta 6.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Rockstarprem007, Mohamed Bawas, Aishwarya Narasimhan and Aishu, noelonassis!

Mozilla VR and Servo

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Moz/FF
  • Pathfinder: a first look at the best fonts and vector graphics on VR/AR

    Second only to watching video, most of the time people spend on computing devices today involves reading text and looking at vector graphics in the toolbars and user interfaces of programs. Over the last 20 years, a great deal of focus has gone into improving the quality of those fonts and graphics: subpixel anti-aliasing, cached font maps, etc.

    Unfortunately, as you can see in the left image below, that work results in grainy and jagged text in modern AR headsets. Ideally, we would render text smoothly at all angles, as shown in the image on the right.

  • This Week In Servo 130

    In the past month, we merged 208 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

  • Mozilla's Servo Beginning To Work On Linux Video Acceleration

    Mozilla developers working on the Servo browser engine code have begun implementing hardware-accelerated video playback for Linux.

    With Linux video acceleration for browsers often being neglected, it's good to see Linux support now being worked on for Servo's video acceleration code path.

Mozilla: TenFourFox, JavaScript, International Grand Committee and W3C

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Moz/FF
  • Finally, a bit of love for Intel Tiger

    Again, a polite reminder that Intel Macs aren't supported, but that doesn't mean people don't want to run TenFourFox on them. Thanks to new builder Hayley, Tiger-compatible versions of FPR14 and the MP4 Enabler are available for Intel. Previous versions have had issues on Tiger due to issue 209, so watch for that if you choose to run these, but initial testing at least looks very promising.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: JavaScript and evidence-based language design

    In what ways can empirical evidence be used in the design of a language like JavaScript? What kind of impact would a more direct connection to developers give us? As stewards of the JavaScript specification, how do we answer questions about the design of JavaScript and help make it accessible to the thousands of new coders who join the industry each year? To answer this we need to experiment, and I need your help.

  • “We believe the internet can be better,” Mozilla to the International Grand Committee

    Alan Davidson, Vice President of Global Policy, Trust and Security testified today on behalf of Mozilla before the International Grand Committee on Big Data, Privacy and Democracy. The International Grand Committee, composed of representatives from numerous governments around the world, has gathered in Ottawa, Canada for its second meeting, hosted by the House of Commons of Canada.

  • Tantek Çelik: I Am Running For The @W3C Advisory Board (@W3CAB)

    I am runnning for the W3C Advisory Board (AB). If you work on or care about open web standards, I am asking you, and in particular your W3C Advisory Committee representative, to vote me for as their #1 vote (due to the way the current W3C STV mechanism is interpreted and implemented by the W3C Team).

    The web community depends on W3C as a key venue for open web standards development. We are in a period of transition and existential risks for W3C (detailed in my official Advisory Board nomination statement). I bring both the experience (served on the AB for five years, 20+ years of first-hand standards work at W3C), and the boldness (created and drove numerous open reforms) necessary to work with an Advisory Board committed to modernizing W3C into a form that continues to support pragmatic & responsive open standards development.

    There are many highly qualified candidates running for the W3C Advisory Board in this election, with a variety of strengths and abilities.

Mozilla/Firefox: Tips, Glimpse and Mozilla Addons

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Moz/FF
  • 11 Tips On Firefox and Chrome: Passwords, Sync Bookmarks, and More

    Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox are the most popular web browsers that are being used by people across the world, since quite some time now. Both browsers come with amazing features and hacks.

    There are times when you want to use both the browsers and switch between them. Do you think it is possible, considering the fact that we keep saving data in each of them separately? Yes. It is. Once the data among the two browsers are synced, you can easily switch between the two of them.

    In this article, we will share some useful tips on Firefox and Chrome web browsers: Sync, Bookmarks, Passwords and More.

  • Mozilla Open Design Blog: A glimpse of what’s to come.

    Today we’re presenting new brand marks for Firefox Monitor and Firefox Lockwise. Lockwise? Yes, that’s the official name for the service we’d nicknamed “Lockbox” during its product development phase. The new icons are meant to signal the functions these apps perform. Firefox Monitor, which helps you discover if your email address has been part of a data breach and can alert you about further breaches, is represented by a magnifying glass. Firefox Lockwise, which provides an easy way to store your Firefox passwords and protect your data, suggests both a lock and a profile. The marks reinforce that all of our Firefox products and services help you keep your personal life private.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Friend of Add-ons: Martin Giger

    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Martin Giger! Martin is a leader and member of the Mozilla Switzerland community, an extension developer, and a frequent contributor to Mozilla’s community forums, where he helps people find answers to their questions about extension development. If you have ever visited our forums or joined one of our channels on IRC, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Martin kindly and patiently helping people resolve their issues. (He has also written a great blog post about how to effectively ask for help when you get stuck on a problem.)

    Martin began contributing to Mozilla in the early 2010s when he began localizing a Thunderbird extension into German and building his first Firefox extension. He also became involved with the Nightingle Media Player project, an open-source audio player and web browser based on the Mozilla XULRunner.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.