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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Gaming News Punch, GNU World Order and More

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: SoftIron, Going Linux, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux

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  • Building Ceph As Linux Of Storage: SoftIron Founder Phil Straw

    During Kubecon + CloudNativeCon in Barcelona TFIR Publisher & Editor, Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Phil Straw, founder and CTO of SoftIron.

    SoftIron has built server appliances based on Ceph open source project. Their goal is to obstruct everything (hardware and software) and enable users to simply reap the benefits of Ceph.

  • Going Linux #370 · Run your business on Linux - Part 4

    After we discuss Bill's latest adventure in distro hopping, we continue our series on Linux applications for running a business. This time, the we are discussing the business of being a writer. From applications to word processors to desktop publishing and graphic creation, Linux has applications for it all.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 150 - Our ad funded dystopian present

    Josh and Kurt talk about the future Chrome and ad blockers. There is a lot of nuance to unpack around this one. There are two versions of the Internet today. One with an ad blocker and one without. The Internet without an ad blocker is a dystopian nightmare. The actionable advice at the end of this one is to use Firefox.

  • Episode 70 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a jam packed episode with new releases of applications and distros, new hardware, new games coming, and so much more. KDE announced the release of Plasma 5.16. AMD wasn’t finished yet, they announced new CPUs and GPU hardware at Computex. Matrix.org announced the milestone release of Matrix 1.0 and the Matrix.org Foundation. We also saw some releases from OBS, PeerTube, LMMS, and more. In Distro News, we’ll check out Crux, Endless OS and Enso OS. We got some interesting news from the Pine64 team about the PinePhone and then we’ll round out the show with some Linux Gaming News from Steam, Atari and a skateboarding birds game on Kickstarter. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Audiocasts/Shows: Texas Linux Fest, This Week in Linux, Full Circle Weekly News and More

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  • Mic And Coke | The Friday Stream 6

    The funniest 17 seconds from Texas Linux Fest and we learn some remarkable things about our crew’s past.

  • Episode 69 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have a LOT of new releases to talk about from applications to distros and even some hardware news. GParted has finally reached the 1.0 milestone, Krita 4.2 & Zorin OS 15 were released this week, and some Security News was released regarding the HiddenWasp Malware so we’ll talk about all of that. In Hardware news, AMD announced their new Ryzen 3000 series CPU and we also got some product updates from System76 & Dell. In Window Manager News, we got some updates from HerbsluftWM and IceWM. Later in the show, we’ll discuss some Linux Gaming News as Google announces news for Google Stadia, Unity Tech announces that the Unity Editor is now available for Linux and we’ll take a look at an open source handheld console called the PyGamer. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #134
  • ZEEEE Shell! | Coder Radio 361

    Apple is shaking up the foundations of UI development with SwiftUI and raising developer eyebrows with a new default shell on MacOS.

    Plus feedback with a FOSS dilemma and an update on our 7 languages challenge.

  • Podcast interviews where I talk about Python's governance

    Over the past two months I have given two podcast interviews where I talk about how we handled Guido's retirement, chose our new governance model, and what being on the inaugural steering council has been like.

    Now that I have "talked it out" at least twice I don't plan to blog about this topic until something more substantial happens with the steering council. Because of this decision I figured it was worth linking to the interviews in case anyone was waiting for me to write a post on Python's governance.

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU World Order, Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News and Python Podcast

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  • GNU World Order 13x24
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 149 - Chat with Michael Coates about data security

    Josh and Kurt have a chat with Michael Coates from Altitude Networks. We cover what Altitude is up to as well as general trends we're seeing around data security in the cloud. Michael lays out his vision for "data first security".

  • Linux Action News 109

    Mozilla's master strategy becomes clear, CockroachDB surrenders to the software as a service reality, while Microsoft and Oracle link up.

    Plus Google argues that keeping Huawei on their Android is better for all, and Chris gets sucked into Stadia.

  • Web Application Development Entirely In Python

    The knowledge and effort required for building a fully functional web application has grown at an accelerated rate over the past several years. This introduces a barrier to entry that excludes large numbers of people who could otherwise be producing valuable and interesting services. To make the onramp easier Meredydd Luff and Ian Davies created Anvil, a platform for full stack web development in pure Python. In this episode Meredydd explains how the Anvil platform is built and how you can use it to build and deploy your own projects. He also shares some examples of people who were able to create profitable businesses themselves because of the reduced complexity. It was interesting to get Meredydd's perspective on the state of the industry for web development and hear his vision of how Anvil is working to make it available for everyone.

    Summary

    The knowledge and effort required for building a fully functional web application has grown at an accelerated rate over the past several years. This introduces a barrier to entry that excludes large numbers of people who could otherwise be producing valuable and interesting services. To make the onramp easier Meredydd Luff and Ian Davies created Anvil, a platform for full stack web development in pure Python. In this episode Meredydd explains how the Anvil platform is built and how you can use it to build and deploy your own projects. He also shares some examples of people who were able to create profitable businesses themselves because of the reduced complexity. It was interesting to get Meredydd’s perspective on the state of the industry for web development and hear his vision of how Anvil is working to make it available for everyone.

From student message board to open-source CMS: a Q&A with the creator of Drupal

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Software
Interviews
Drupal
Web

Drupal has completely changed the way large organisations think about and build their digital estate.

The open source content management system (CMS), which was founded in the year 2000, is now used by some of the world’s biggest brands like Warner Music, Virgin Sport, Princess Cruises and Wilson because of its ability to handle huge spikes of web traffic and because of how it enables marketers to manage their brand digitally on a global level.

TechRadar Pro recently had the opportunity to interview the creator of Drupal, Dries Buytaert who told us how he came to create the CMS and gave us insight into what's in store for future versions...

Read more

Also: Acquia Lightning Revamped, Enonic 7.0 Released, More Open Source News [Ed: Drupal founder now selling better performance]

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly With CryptPad and Linux in the Ham Shack

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  • FLOSS Weekly 532: CryptPad

    CryptPad is a private-by-design alternative to popular office tools and cloud services. All the content stored on CryptPad is encrypted before being sent, which means nobody can access your data unless you give them the keys.

    With CryptPad, you can make quick collaborative documents for taking notes and writing down ideas together. It allows for fast & easy collaboration, with CryptPad using 100% client-side encryption to protect the content that you type from CryptPad.

  • LHS Episode #287: Fruit of Widevine

    Welcome to Episode 287 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss several topics including sunspots and planetary alignment, proprietary encryption protocols in common browsers, high-altitude balloons, satellite LIDs, new malware, new WSJT-X and much more. Thank you for listening.

Linus Torvalds Prefers Transparency, Despite Risks

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Linux
Interviews

Outbursts are a common practice in any environment – whether professional or personal. Since the Linux kernel community works in open and all discussions happen publicly on LKML, Torvalds’ outburst used to be picked up by bloggers to sensationalize them.

In this interview, we asked if Torvalds wish that there was a private mailing list for the kernel developers so that they could safely discuss critical topics without worrying about ‘tabloid’ journalists picking on internal discussions and create controversial stories around them

Read more

Shows and Events: OpenShift Commons Briefing, Linux Gaming News Punch, SUSE, Libre Graphics Meeting 2019 and More

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Interviews
OSS
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift on IBM Power with Manoj Kumar (IBM)
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Deploy Applications Faster on OpenShift via Spinnaker CD with Gopinath Rebala (Opsmx)
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 15, another weekly round-up

    For the fifteenth week running, here's your bite-sized round-up of a few interesting bits of Linux gaming news from the past week.

  • An interview with Thomas Di Giacomo about the state of Kubernetes

    I recently attended KubeCon EU 2019 in Barcelona. While there, I got the chance to chat with our CTO, Thomas Di Giacomo, about the state of Kubernetes and its marketplace. We also talked about the community centered culture of Kubernetes as well as some his dreams for the tech world. It was a great conversation and I believe it highlights just why there is this incredible amount of hype surrounding Kubernetes:

  • Geekos, Containers, and Clouds… Oh my! (Case Study of SUSE’s Integrated Stack)

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Rick Ashford and Nathan Nelson from SUSE demonstrated how the Global Sales Engineering team uses its geeko.land cloud to demonstrate the full stack solution of SUSE OpenStack Cloud, SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE CaaS Platform, and SUSE Cloud Application Platform, all fully integrated and working together. They provide an overview of the Sales Engineering lab infrastructure and lessons learned during deployment and integration of our private cloud deployment.

  • I was at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2019

    I had a nice surprise last Monday, I learned that the city where I live Saarbrücken (Germany) is hosting the 2019 edition of the nice Libre Graphics Meeting (lgm). So I took the opportunity to attend my first FOSS event. The event took place at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Saar from the Wed 29.05 to Sunday 02.06.

    I really enjoyed, I meet a lot of other Free Software contributors (not only devs), and discovered some nice programming and artistic projects.

    There were some really impressive presentations and workshops.

  • Recommended Open Source Compliance Practices for the Enterprise

    Recommended Open Source Compliance Practices for the Enterprise
    Open source software provides significant economies to be gained through shared and transparent development, which offers access to source code, the ability to customize the source code based on specific needs, results in faster time-to-market for products and services, and provides access to a large pool of innovators. As such, open source software provides major competitive advantages when used appropriately, and when users comply with its licensing terms.

    With an incredibly high adoption rate and the increasing rapid adaptation of source code, enterprises are often on the lookout for better ways to maintain proper license compliance for the hundreds and thousands of open source components included in their products and services. This paper offers practical recommendations to help them improve their open source compliance practices.

  • The Open Infrastructure Summit comes to Shanghai

    The Call for Presentations for the Open Infrastructure Summit in Shanghai is now open, closing on July 2nd. This is the first time that the Open Infrastructure community has descended en masse upon mainland China, so this is an exciting milestone for Open Infrastructure.

    At the recent Summit in Denver, we saw presentations given by community members from around the globe – sharing their stories, presenting alongside others working for competing organisations to share knowledge and find solutions to problems. As Jonathan Bryce’s keynote put it – collaborating without borders.

Shows: Linux Action News, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

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Interviews
  • Linux Action News 108

    Frankenstein Linux malware and a Docker bug that’s blown out of proportion get our attention this week.

    As well as the new GParted release, the Unity Editor for Linux and the Browser vendors struggle with the W3C’s latest twist.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 148 - You just got pwnt, what now?

    Josh and Kurt talk about public disclosure of a security incident. We start out with a story about Canva, then discuss what do you do if you have a security incident? Who do you tell, what do you tell them. How do you tell your story? It's a really hard problem even if it's something you've done many times in the past.

  • GNU World Order 13x23

Shows: BSD Now, Python Bytes, TFiR, Choose Linux

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Interviews
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More in Tux Machines

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

NSA Back Doors in Windows Causing Chaos While Media is Obsessing Over DoS Linux Bug

  • U.S. Government Announces Critical Warning For Microsoft Windows Users
    The United States Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has gone public with a warning to Microsoft Windows users regarding a critical security vulnerability. By issuing the "update now" warning, CISA has joined the likes of Microsoft itself and the National Security Agency (NSA) in warning Windows users of the danger from the BlueKeep vulnerability. This latest warning, and many would argue the one with most gravitas, comes hot on the heels of Yaniv Balmas, the global head of cyber research at security vendor Check Point, telling me in an interview for SC Magazine UK that "it's now a race against the clock by cyber criminals which makes this vulnerability a ticking cyber bomb." Balmas also predicted that it will only be "a matter of weeks" before attackers started exploiting BlueKeep. The CISA alert appears to confirm this, stating that it has, "coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep." That it can confirm a remote code execution on Windows 2000 might not sound too frightening, this is an old operating system after all, it would be unwise to classify this as an exercise in fear, uncertainty and doubt. Until now, the exploits that have been developed, at least those seen in operation, did nothing more than crash the computer. Achieving remote code execution brings the specter of the BlueKeep worm into view as it brings control of infected machines to the attacker.
  • Netflix uncovers SACK Panic vuln that can bork Linux-based systems

Graphics: AMDVLK Still Hasn't Yet Adopted FreeSync Support, a Look at Hair Renderer In Vulkan

  • AMDVLK Still Hasn't Yet Adopted FreeSync Support
    While the AMDGPU kernel driver has shipped with the long-awaited FreeSync support since the Linux 5.0 release earlier this year and was quickly wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver in Mesa 19.0 while the recent Mesa 19.1 update brought FreeSync for the RADV Vulkan driver, AMDVLK as AMD's official open-source Vulkan driver isn't yet supporting this variable rate refresh technology. It's a bit ironic that the AMDVLK Vulkan driver still hasn't done its bit of hooking into the AMDGPU FreeSync support even though the code-base is partially shared with their Windows driver and the unofficial Mesa-based "RADV" Vulkan driver is already shipping with this feature in place. When looking through the latest AMDVLK code, the FreeSync functionality remains absent.
  • VKHR - An AMD-Backed Open-Source Hair Renderer In Vulkan
    VKHR is an open-source, real-time hybrid hair renderer written in Vulkan and developed under the support of AMD/RTG. AMD previously worked on some great hair rendering tech with TressFX but now it's being taken to a whole new level with VKHR. VKHR is being led by Erik Jansson of AMD as a real-time hybrid hair renderer "written 100% from scratch in Vulkan" and using C++17 code. VKHR has a built-in ray-tracer based on Intel's Embree technology. And there's even a built-in benchmark for comparing the project's hair rendering performance.