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Interviews

Fedora at 15: Why Matthew Miller sees a bright future for the Linux distribution

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Red Hat
Interviews

Fedora—as a Linux distribution—will celebrate the 15th anniversary of its first release in November, though its technical lineage is much older, as Fedora Core 1 was created following the discontinuation of Red Hat Linux 9 in favor of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

That was a turbulent time in Red Hat history, and Fedora has had its own share of turbulence as well. Since becoming project leader in June 2014, Matthew Miller had led the Fedora.next initiative, intended to guide the second decade of the Fedora project. That initiative resulted in the creation of separate Fedora Workstation, Server, and Cloud editions—the latter of which has since been replaced with CoreOS—as well as the addition of an Internet of Things (IoT) edition.

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Drupal shows leadership on diversity and inclusion

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Interviews
Drupal

Drupal is far from alone among open source communities with a diversity gap, and I think it deserves a lot of credit for tackling these issues head-on. Diversity and inclusion is a much broader topic than most of us realize. Before I read DDI's August newsletter, the history of indigenous people in my community was something that I hadn't really thought about before. Thanks to DDI's project, I'm not only aware of the people who lived in Maryland long before me, but I've come to appreciate and respect what they brought to this land.

I encourage you to learn about the native people in your homeland and record their history in DDI's Land Acknowledgements blog. If you're a member of another open source project, consider replicating this project there. The more we know about people who differ from us, the more we respect and appreciate our collective roles as members of the human race.

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Interview with Fabian Mosakowski

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

My name is Fabian Mosakowski and I’m an aspiring illustrator living in France. I’m currently working on my portfolio creating an illustrated fantasy tale called “If Only Blood Was Red”. It deals with what’s left of humans thriving to survive in a land that doesn’t welcome them.

Currently as a hobby artist. I made a few comissions for close relatives but I’d like to make it professional once my portfolio will be done.

Mainly fantasy as it’s the narrative thread of my project but I also mix it with dark art, another genre I really enjoy, to fit the story atmosphere. I also occasionnally work in vectorial or comic book style for lighter projects.

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How a business was built on podcasts for Linux: The story of Jupiter Broadcasting

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

I spend a lot of time on the road and enjoy listening to podcasts about a variety of topics. One of my interests is keeping up with the latest news and information about Linux and open source, and that led me to Jupiter Broadcasting, an open source (both in topics covered and its own license) podcasting network. I met Jupiter's cofounder Chris Fisher when I visited System76's Denver headquarters in late 2018.

Jupiter Broadcasting emerged from The Linux Action Show, a podcast that began in 2006 and ended 10 years later in early 2017. The show was such a success that, in 2008, Chris and co-founder Bryan Lunduke decided to start Jupiter Broadcasting. Back then, the company only had two shows, The Linux Action Show and CastaBlasta. Now it offers 10 Linux-related podcasts with titles like Linux Headlines, Linux Action News, Choose Linux, Coder Radio, Self-Hosted, and more.

I was interested in learning more about Jupiter, so I was grateful when Chris agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity).

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through, Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Talk Python to Me

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Interviews
  • SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at SparkyLinux 5.9. Enjoy!

  • 2019-10-10 | Linux Headlines

    The Tor Project blacklists old relays, GitLab plans to introduce telemetry, Steam is working on a new multiplayer feature, The Matrix Project announces new funding, and AMP is getting a new home.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E27 – Exile

    This week we’ve been playing LEGO Worlds and tinkering with Thinkpads. We round up the news and goings on from the Ubuntu community, introduce a new segment, share some events and discuss our news picks from the tech world.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 27 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Talk Python to Me: #233 The Masonite Python Web Framework

    Folks, it's not like the old days where there were just a couple of web frameworks for building apps with Python. These days there are many. One of those frameworks is the Masonite web framework created by Joseph Mancuso. Joseph is here today to tell us all about Masonite, what makes it special, it's core value proposition for web developers and much more.

Audiocasts/Shows: Xfce 4.14 Desktop, TLLTS and Jupiter Shows

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Interviews
  • What’s New in Xfce 4.14 Desktop

    After 4 years and 5 months of development, Xfce 4.14 was finally released. a release that it is probably included in the software repositories of almost all Linux-based operating systems. The goal for Xfce 4.14, as the developers explain, was to port all of the core components to the latest GTK3 and GDBus open-source technologies, instead of the old GTK2 and D-Bus Glib.

    Window manager Xfce 4.14, now support VSync to reduce display flickering. It also now supports HiDPI, NVIDIA proprietary/closed source drivers, XInput2. XFCE 4.14 also introduces a new default theme.

    A new default theme is present as well in Xfce 4.14, and the Thunar file manager now features a completely revamped pathbar, BluRay support for the volume manager, support for larger thumbnails, improved keyboard navigation, and support for a “folder.jpg” file to alter the folder’s icon.

    XFCE 4.14 Panel got support for RandR’s primary monitor feature, improved window grouping in the tasklist plugin (better UX, visual group indicator etc), a per-panel “icon-size” setting, a new default clock format. Users can also now change the orientation of the icons on the desktop, as well as to preview Fujifilm RAF images in the file manager.

  • Home Network Under $200 | Self-Hosted 3

    How far can you get with a Raspberry Pi 4? We go all in and find out.

    Plus our favorite travel router with WireGuard built in, and Chris kicks off Project Off-Grid. Meanwhile, Alex adopts proprietary software.

  • Lack Rack, Jack | BSD Now 319

    Causing ZFS corruption for fun, NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial, The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers, a new OmniOS Community Edition LTS has been published, List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style, Project Trident 19.10 available, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828
  • 2019-10-09 | Linux Headlines

    SUSE drops OpenStack Cloud, OpenLibra looks to piggyback on Facebook's cryptocurrency, OpenSSH adds in-RAM protections and Essential teases flashy new phone.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, mintCast and Chat With Executive Producer at Linux Academy

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Interviews
  • Just Enough VPN | LINUX Unplugged 322

    We reveal our secrets for bridging networks with WireGuard and Linux-powered networking.

    Plus the future of OpenPGP in Thunderbird, a disappointing update for the Atari VCS, and a shiny new Spotify client for your terminal.

  • mintCast 319 – New Mumble

    First up, in our Wanderings, I talk Dynamic DNS, Tony is writing articles, Moss test drives EndeavourOS, Josh visited Media City, and Joe relaxes with fiction.

    Then, our news: CentOS 8 and Mumble 1.3 are released, Ubuntu 19.10 is almost here, the GNOME Foundation and Docker navigate rough seas, and more.

  • A Chat with Angela Fisher | Jupiter Extras 21

    Brent sits down with Angela Fisher, Executive Producer at Linux Academy, Jupiter Broadcasting co-founder, co-host of many JB productions including The FauxShow, and Tech Talk Today, among others. We touch on a variety of topics including the early beginnings of Jupiter Broadcasting, the origins of Brunch with Brent, aswell as many that are closer to her heart - from painting to parenting.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Full Circle Weekly News, Linux Headlines and Feren OS Next KDE Beta 3 Run Through

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Python Podcast and Linux Headlines

Filed under
Interviews
  • Going Linux #378 · Zorin Review

    Our review of of Zorin OS includes a give-away of one copy of Zorin Ultimate.

  • Network Automation At Enterprise Scale With Python

    Designing and maintaining enterprise networks and the associated hardware is a complex and time consuming task. Network automation tools allow network engineers to codify their workflows and make them repeatable. In this episode Antoine Fourmy describes his work on eNMS and how it can be used to automate enterprise grade networks. He explains how his background in telecom networking led him to build an open source platform for network engineers, how it is architected, and how you can use it for creating your own workflows. This is definitely worth listening to as a way to gain some appreciation for all of the work that goes on behind the scenes to make the internet possible.

  • 2019-10-07 | Linux Headlines

    The FSF is looking for some direction, StackStorm joins the Linux Foundation, and GNOME users who like it a little traditional get some good news.

    Plus the Pinebook Pro starts shipping to customers, and more.

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More in Tux Machines

VirtualBox Adds Support for Linux Kernel 5.3, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Beta

VirtualBox 6.0.14 is here to add support for new technologies, fix bug, and add various improvements. For example it implements support for the Linux 5.3 kernel series, as well as for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7, CentOS Linux 7.7, Oracle Linux 7.7m and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Beta operating systems. On top of that, VirtualBox 6.0.14 improves the detection of the Python version during the creation of the RPM package on Linux hosts to address some installation issues addresses and package dependencies, and improves shared folders for Linux guests, especially when unmounting them in service script. Read more

Fedora at 15: Why Matthew Miller sees a bright future for the Linux distribution

Fedora—as a Linux distribution—will celebrate the 15th anniversary of its first release in November, though its technical lineage is much older, as Fedora Core 1 was created following the discontinuation of Red Hat Linux 9 in favor of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). That was a turbulent time in Red Hat history, and Fedora has had its own share of turbulence as well. Since becoming project leader in June 2014, Matthew Miller had led the Fedora.next initiative, intended to guide the second decade of the Fedora project. That initiative resulted in the creation of separate Fedora Workstation, Server, and Cloud editions—the latter of which has since been replaced with CoreOS—as well as the addition of an Internet of Things (IoT) edition. Read more

Some nice widgets for your Plasma desktop

Plasma is an extremely extensible, flexible desktop environment, and it lets you customize and change anything and everything to the tiniest detail. You can go about mimicking other desktops and systems as you please, limited only by your imagination and patience. If you want a Mac-like look or a Unity look, you can. So I thought, I should revisit my old Plasma widgets article and explore some fresh applets out there, to see what else you can do here. Indeed, there are lots of hidden goodies lurking beneath the surface, and if you're curious, you will discover fresh tools and features that can make the Plasma desktop experience even more enjoyable. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2 and unbound), Fedora (opendmarc, runc, and sudo), openSUSE (epiphany, GraphicsMagick, and libopenmpt), Oracle (kernel and sudo), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, jss, kernel, kernel-rt, and kpatch-patch), SUSE (crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, novnc, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-lbaas, openstack-nova, openstack-tempest, python-pysaml2, python-urllib3, rubygem-chef, rubygem-easy_diff, sleshammer, libpcap, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (aspell and libsdl1.2).

  • Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Increasing our self-awareness so we can improve security

    October has been National Cybersecurity Awareness Month since 2004. According to staysafeonline.org, this initiative was started by the National Cybersecurity Alliance and the US Department of Homeland Security to help all Americans stay safe and secure when online. This month is usually marked with a significant uptick in cybersecurity outreach and training. It’s also the one month of the year when you can get a significant amount of cybersecurity swag such as webcam covers, mugs, and pens. This event has an outward focus to raise awareness of security globally, Many other events have come into existence along with this. For example, there are numerous electronics recycling events that now occur in October where people can securely dispose of their old computers. Some municipalities have extended this to include safe disposal of old prescription medications, paints, and other hazardous materials. Recent events in the greater technology community, specifically the resignation of Richard Stallman from both MIT and the Free Software Foundation, have become character foils that show us that while we have come a long way, we still have a long way ahead of us to improve.

  • Michael Tremer/IPFire: On quadrupling throughput of our Quality of Service

    There have been improvements to our Quality of Service (or QoS) which have made me very excited. Our QoS sometimes was a bottleneck. Enabling it could cut your bandwidth in half if you were unlucky. That normally was not a problem for larger users of IPFire, because if you are running a 1 Gigabit/s connection, you would not need any QoS in the first place, or your hardware was fast enough to handle the extra load. For the smaller users this was, however, becoming more and more of a problem. Smaller systems like the IPFire Mini Appliance are designed to be small (the clue is in the name) and to be very energy-efficient. And they are. They are popular with users with a standard DSL connection of up to 100 Megabit/s which is very common in Germany. You have nothing to worry about here. But if you are lucky to have a faster Internet connection, then this hardware and others that we have sold before might be running out of steam. There is only so much you can get out of them.

  • The City Of Baltimore Blew Off A $76,000 Ransomware Demand Only To Find Out A Bunch Of Its Data Had Never Been Backed Up [Ed: Windows]

    The City of Baltimore was hit with a ransomware attack in May of this year. Criminals using remodeled and rebranded NSA exploits (EternalBlue) knocked out a "majority" of the city's servers and crippled many of its applications. More details didn't surface until September when the city's government began reshuffling the budget to cover the expenses of recovering from the attack.