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Interviews

Audiocasts: Going Linux and Full Circle Magazine

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Interviews

How Linux testing has changed and what matters today

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Linux
Interviews

If you've ever wondered how your Linux computer stacks up against other Linux, Windows, and MacOS machines or searched for reviews of Linux-compatible hardware, you're probably familiar with Phoronix. Along with its website, which attracts more than 250 million visitors a year to its Linux reviews and news, the company also offers the Phoronix Test Suite, an open source hardware benchmarking tool, and OpenBenchmarking.org, where test result data is stored.

According to Michael Larabel, who started Phoronix in 2004, the site "is frequently cited as being the leading source for those interested in computer hardware and Linux. It offers insights regarding the development of the Linux kernel, product reviews, interviews, and news regarding free and open source software."

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New Audiocasts: LHS and Destination Linux

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Interviews
  • LHS Episode #272: The Weekender XXIV

    Good grief! It's the latest edition of the Weekender! In this episode, the hosts put together a list of amateur radio contests and special events, upcoming open source conferences and a hefty does of hedonism that blends together and goes down like a luxurious sippin' whiskey. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have an amazing upcoming fortnight.

  • Destination Linux EP108 – Ubuntu Studio Amped Up

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some news for Makulu Linux, GNOME 3.32, IPFire 2.21 and more. We’ll also check out a cool new system deployment tool that could change how multi-booting is done. Then we’ll check out a new desktop offering from ZaReason as well as an overclocking tool for Team Green users. Later in the show we’ll talk about some Linux Gaming news and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

elementary 5 "Juno"

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OS
Interviews
Reviews

In the spring of 2014 (nearly five years ago), I was preparing a regular presentation I give most years—where I look at the bad side (and the good side) of the greater Linux world. As I had done in years prior, I was preparing a graph showing the market share of various Linux distributions changing over time.

But, this year, something was different.

In the span of less than two years, a tiny little Linux distro came out of nowhere to become one of the most watched and talked about systems available. In the blink of an eye, it went from nothing to passing several grand-daddies of Linux flavors that had been around for decades.

This was elementary. Needless to say, it caught my attention.

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Audiocasts: BSD Strategy, FLOSS Weekly, Linux in the Ham Shack

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Interviews
  • BSD Strategy | BSD Now 285

    Strategic thinking to keep FreeBSD relevant, reflecting on the soul of a new machine, 10GbE Benchmarks On Nine Linux Distros and FreeBSD, NetBSD integrating LLVM sanitizers in base, FreeNAS 11.2 distrowatch review, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 517: Liverpool MakeFest

    Caroline is the co-founder of the free event called Liverpool Makefest, a festival to promote stem, foss and maker-education for young people. The festival is now in its fifth year has attracted over 20,000 visitors and is being expanded across the national libraries within the UK.

  • LHS Episode #271: The Discord Accord

    Welcome to Episode 271 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this week's episode, the hosts discuss ARISS Phase 2, the Peanut Android app for D-STAR and DMR linking, a geostationary satellite from Qatar, open source software in the public sector, a new open-source color management tool, Linux distributions for ham radio and much more. Thank you to everyone for listening and don't forget our Hamvention 2019 fundraiser!

Audiocasts: LINUX Unplugged 288, mintCast 302 and 5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users

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Interviews
  • We're Gonna Need a Bigger Repo | LINUX Unplugged 288

    The hype around a new security flaw hits new levels. Fedora has a bunch of news, and we discover what's new in the latest Plasma release.

    Plus we fall down the openSUSE rabbit hole when Ell updates us on her desktop challenge.

    Special Guests: Alan Pope, Brent Gervais, Daniel Fore, Ell Marquez, Martin Wimpress, and Neal Gompa.

  • mintCast 302 – New Users, Start Here
  • 5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users

    5 Linux Mint Issues For Windows Users. Any Windows user considering the switch to Linux Mint would be wise to consider the following points before taking the leap into a new Linux distribution. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to have you join us! But there are issues to consider before switching from Windows over to Linux Mint.

Audiocasts: Open Source Security Podcast, SMLR, This Week in Linux and GNU World Order

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Interviews
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 133 - Smart locks and the government hacking devices

    Josh and Kurt talk about the fiasco hacks4pancakes described on Twitter and what the future of smart locks will look like. We then discuss what it means if the Japanese government starts hacking consumer IoT gear, is it ethical? Will it make anything better?

  • SMLR Episode 300 “Linux is Obsolete” ?
  • Episode 54 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, the new Radeon VII beast from AMD is out and we’ll check out some benchmarks from our friends at Phoronix. A new version of KDE Plasma is coming out soon, in just a couple of days, so we will have a look at what is coming in KDE Plasma 5.15. We got some new app releases from LibreOffice and Flowblade and there was a bunch of Distro News this week from Fedora, SystemRescueCd, Redcore Linux, and some new distros or at least new to me with Linux Kodachi & Refracta. Later in the show, we’ll cover some Gaming Sales from Humble Bundle and Steam. All that and much more!

  • GNU World Order 13x7

Audiocasts: The Linux Link Tech Show, Going Linux and FLOSS Weekly

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Interviews

Audiocasts: Going Linux and Linux in the Ham Shack

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Interviews
  • Going Linux #362 · Run your business on Linux - Part 3

    In this episode, we thought we'd provide some more ideas around software for every business. Accounting software. If you are running a small business and you are doing the bookkeeping yourself, you will likely quickly run into the need for ensuring that you keep track of your incoming revenue, your outgoing expenses, payroll, and other things related to money. Having to license or purchase accounting software, especially for starting businesses, is expensive. This episode will provide with a few things you can try out at no risk and at no charge to keep track of your business (and personal) finances.

  • LHS Episode #270: Logbook of the World Deep Dive

    Welcome to the latest episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a deep dive into the ARRL application Logbook of the World. It's a logging application with two components: the online database and statistical analysis tools at the ARRL site and the TrustedQSL cross-platform application for managing certificates, encrypting and uploading QSO data and more. LHS takes a look at all of its features, caveats, uses and more. Thank you for listening.

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Server: HTTP Clients, IIS DDoS and 'DevOps' Hype From Red Hat

  • What are good command line HTTP clients?
    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a “software tools” movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well independently. This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files over the internet from the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications. Working with HTTP from the command-line is a worthwhile skill for HTTP architects and API designers. If you need to play around with an API, HTTPie and curl will be invaluable.
  • Microsoft publishes security alert on IIS bug that causes 100% CPU usage spikes
    The Microsoft Security Response Center published yesterday a security advisory about a denial of service (DOS) issue impacting IIS (Internet Information Services), Microsoft's web server technology.
  • 5 things to master to be a DevOps engineer
    There's an increasing global demand for DevOps professionals, IT pros who are skilled in software development and operations. In fact, the Linux Foundation's Open Source Jobs Report ranked DevOps as the most in-demand skill, and DevOps career opportunities are thriving worldwide. The main focus of DevOps is bridging the gap between development and operations teams by reducing painful handoffs and increasing collaboration. This is not accomplished by making developers work on operations tasks nor by making system administrators work on development tasks. Instead, both of these roles are replaced by a single role, DevOps, that works on tasks within a cooperative team. As Dave Zwieback wrote in DevOps Hiring, "organizations that have embraced DevOps need people who would naturally resist organization silos."

Purism's Privacy and Security-Focused Librem 5 Linux Phone to Arrive in Q3 2019

Initially planned to ship in early 2019, the revolutionary Librem 5 mobile phone was delayed for April 2019, but now it suffered just one more delay due to the CPU choices the development team had to make to deliver a stable and reliable device that won't heat up or discharge too quickly. Purism had to choose between the i.MX8M Quad or the i.MX8M Mini processors for their Librem 5 Linux-powered smartphone, but after many trials and errors they decided to go with the i.MX8M Quad CPU as manufacturer NXP recently released a new software stack solving all previous power consumption and heating issues. Read more

Qt Creator 4.9 Beta released

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.9 Beta! There are many improvements and fixes included in Qt Creator 4.9. I’ll just mention some highlights in this blog post. Please refer to our change log for a more thorough overview. Read more

Hack Week - Browsersync integration for Online

Recently my LibreOffice work is mostly focused on the Online. It's nice to see how it is growing with new features and has better UI. But when I was working on improving toolbars (eg. folding menubar or reorganization of items) I noticed one annoying thing from the developer perspective. After every small change, I had to restart the server to provide updated content for the browser. It takes few seconds for switching windows, killing old server then running new one which requires some tests to be passed. Last week during the Hack Week funded by Collabora Productivity I was able to work on my own projects. It was a good opportunity for me to try to improve the process mentioned above. I've heard previously about browsersync so I decided to try it out. It is a tool which can automatically reload used .css and .js files in all browser sessions after change detection. To make it work browsersync can start proxy server watching files on the original server and sending events to the browser clients if needed. Read more