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Interviews

Interview with Fabian Mosakowski

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KDE
Interviews

My name is Fabian Mosakowski and I’m an aspiring illustrator living in France. I’m currently working on my portfolio creating an illustrated fantasy tale called “If Only Blood Was Red”. It deals with what’s left of humans thriving to survive in a land that doesn’t welcome them.

Currently as a hobby artist. I made a few comissions for close relatives but I’d like to make it professional once my portfolio will be done.

Mainly fantasy as it’s the narrative thread of my project but I also mix it with dark art, another genre I really enjoy, to fit the story atmosphere. I also occasionnally work in vectorial or comic book style for lighter projects.

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How a business was built on podcasts for Linux: The story of Jupiter Broadcasting

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

I spend a lot of time on the road and enjoy listening to podcasts about a variety of topics. One of my interests is keeping up with the latest news and information about Linux and open source, and that led me to Jupiter Broadcasting, an open source (both in topics covered and its own license) podcasting network. I met Jupiter's cofounder Chris Fisher when I visited System76's Denver headquarters in late 2018.

Jupiter Broadcasting emerged from The Linux Action Show, a podcast that began in 2006 and ended 10 years later in early 2017. The show was such a success that, in 2008, Chris and co-founder Bryan Lunduke decided to start Jupiter Broadcasting. Back then, the company only had two shows, The Linux Action Show and CastaBlasta. Now it offers 10 Linux-related podcasts with titles like Linux Headlines, Linux Action News, Choose Linux, Coder Radio, Self-Hosted, and more.

I was interested in learning more about Jupiter, so I was grateful when Chris agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity).

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through, Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Talk Python to Me

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Interviews
  • SparkyLinux 5.9 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at SparkyLinux 5.9. Enjoy!

  • 2019-10-10 | Linux Headlines

    The Tor Project blacklists old relays, GitLab plans to introduce telemetry, Steam is working on a new multiplayer feature, The Matrix Project announces new funding, and AMP is getting a new home.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E27 – Exile

    This week we’ve been playing LEGO Worlds and tinkering with Thinkpads. We round up the news and goings on from the Ubuntu community, introduce a new segment, share some events and discuss our news picks from the tech world.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 27 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Talk Python to Me: #233 The Masonite Python Web Framework

    Folks, it's not like the old days where there were just a couple of web frameworks for building apps with Python. These days there are many. One of those frameworks is the Masonite web framework created by Joseph Mancuso. Joseph is here today to tell us all about Masonite, what makes it special, it's core value proposition for web developers and much more.

Audiocasts/Shows: Xfce 4.14 Desktop, TLLTS and Jupiter Shows

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Interviews
  • What’s New in Xfce 4.14 Desktop

    After 4 years and 5 months of development, Xfce 4.14 was finally released. a release that it is probably included in the software repositories of almost all Linux-based operating systems. The goal for Xfce 4.14, as the developers explain, was to port all of the core components to the latest GTK3 and GDBus open-source technologies, instead of the old GTK2 and D-Bus Glib.

    Window manager Xfce 4.14, now support VSync to reduce display flickering. It also now supports HiDPI, NVIDIA proprietary/closed source drivers, XInput2. XFCE 4.14 also introduces a new default theme.

    A new default theme is present as well in Xfce 4.14, and the Thunar file manager now features a completely revamped pathbar, BluRay support for the volume manager, support for larger thumbnails, improved keyboard navigation, and support for a “folder.jpg” file to alter the folder’s icon.

    XFCE 4.14 Panel got support for RandR’s primary monitor feature, improved window grouping in the tasklist plugin (better UX, visual group indicator etc), a per-panel “icon-size” setting, a new default clock format. Users can also now change the orientation of the icons on the desktop, as well as to preview Fujifilm RAF images in the file manager.

  • Home Network Under $200 | Self-Hosted 3

    How far can you get with a Raspberry Pi 4? We go all in and find out.

    Plus our favorite travel router with WireGuard built in, and Chris kicks off Project Off-Grid. Meanwhile, Alex adopts proprietary software.

  • Lack Rack, Jack | BSD Now 319

    Causing ZFS corruption for fun, NetBSD Assembly Programming Tutorial, The IKEA Lack Rack for Servers, a new OmniOS Community Edition LTS has been published, List Block Devices on FreeBSD lsblk(8) Style, Project Trident 19.10 available, and more.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828
  • 2019-10-09 | Linux Headlines

    SUSE drops OpenStack Cloud, OpenLibra looks to piggyback on Facebook's cryptocurrency, OpenSSH adds in-RAM protections and Essential teases flashy new phone.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, mintCast and Chat With Executive Producer at Linux Academy

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Interviews
  • Just Enough VPN | LINUX Unplugged 322

    We reveal our secrets for bridging networks with WireGuard and Linux-powered networking.

    Plus the future of OpenPGP in Thunderbird, a disappointing update for the Atari VCS, and a shiny new Spotify client for your terminal.

  • mintCast 319 – New Mumble

    First up, in our Wanderings, I talk Dynamic DNS, Tony is writing articles, Moss test drives EndeavourOS, Josh visited Media City, and Joe relaxes with fiction.

    Then, our news: CentOS 8 and Mumble 1.3 are released, Ubuntu 19.10 is almost here, the GNOME Foundation and Docker navigate rough seas, and more.

  • A Chat with Angela Fisher | Jupiter Extras 21

    Brent sits down with Angela Fisher, Executive Producer at Linux Academy, Jupiter Broadcasting co-founder, co-host of many JB productions including The FauxShow, and Tech Talk Today, among others. We touch on a variety of topics including the early beginnings of Jupiter Broadcasting, the origins of Brunch with Brent, aswell as many that are closer to her heart - from painting to parenting.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Full Circle Weekly News, Linux Headlines and Feren OS Next KDE Beta 3 Run Through

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Interviews

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Python Podcast and Linux Headlines

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Interviews
  • Going Linux #378 · Zorin Review

    Our review of of Zorin OS includes a give-away of one copy of Zorin Ultimate.

  • Network Automation At Enterprise Scale With Python

    Designing and maintaining enterprise networks and the associated hardware is a complex and time consuming task. Network automation tools allow network engineers to codify their workflows and make them repeatable. In this episode Antoine Fourmy describes his work on eNMS and how it can be used to automate enterprise grade networks. He explains how his background in telecom networking led him to build an open source platform for network engineers, how it is architected, and how you can use it for creating your own workflows. This is definitely worth listening to as a way to gain some appreciation for all of the work that goes on behind the scenes to make the internet possible.

  • 2019-10-07 | Linux Headlines

    The FSF is looking for some direction, StackStorm joins the Linux Foundation, and GNOME users who like it a little traditional get some good news.

    Plus the Pinebook Pro starts shipping to customers, and more.

Misc. Shows and Screencasts

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Interviews
  • 10/03/2019 | Linux Headlines

    PostgreSQL 12 is here with performance gains and more, Google plans to phase out mixed security content in Chrome, and a new funding source for The Document Foundation.

  • The Coffee Shop Problem | TechSNAP 413

    We peer into the future with a quick look at quantum supremacy, debate the latest DNS over HTTPS drama, and jump through the hoops of HTTP/3.

    Plus when to use WARP, the secrets of Startpage, and the latest Ryzen release.

  • LHS Episode #306: The Weekender XXXV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Command Line Heroes season 3, episode 8: The C Change

    C and UNIX are at the root of modern computing. Many of the languages we've covered this season are related to or at least influenced by C. But UNIX and C only happened because a few developers at Bell Labs created both as a skunkworks project.

  • Reality 2.0 – Destroy This Podcast

    Katherine Druckman, Doc Searls, and Petros Koutoupis talk about ownership, freedom, and convenience in the digital world.

  • Lubuntu 19.10 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Lubuntu 19.10 Beta. 

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, BSD Now, Linux Headlines, Linux in the Ham Shack and TLLTS

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Interviews
  • FLOSS Weekly 549: PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL, also known as Postgres, is a free and open-source relational database management system emphasizing extensibility and technical standards compliance. It is designed to handle a range of workloads, from single machines to data warehouses or Web services with many concurrent users.

  • The TrueNAS Library | BSD Now 318

    DragonFlyBSD vs. FreeBSD vs. Linux benchmark on Ryzen 7, JFK Presidential Library chooses TrueNAS for digital archives, FreeBSD 12.1-beta is available, cool but obscure X11 tools, vBSDcon trip report, Project Trident 12-U7 is available, a couple new Unix artifacts, and more.

  • 10/02/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Nextcloud goes pro, the self-proclaimed "Steam replacement" reaches version 1, and Microsoft drops some far-out future tech.

    Plus Linux app throttling is in the works for Chrome OS.

  • LHS Episode #305: Morning Mink

    Welcome to Episode 305 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss the Amazon being invasive (no, really!), amateur radio in France, Australia and space, artificial intelligence multi-SDR boards and much more. Thank you for listening and we hope you have a great week.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828

    ubuntu 19.10, 3d printing, streaming, good stuff

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Bpfcc New Release

    bpfcc version 0.11.0 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and should be accessible in the repositories by now. After the 0.8.0 release, this has been the next one uploaded to Debian.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: Joining Debian LTS!

    Back during the good days of DebConf19, I finally got a chance to meet Holger! As amazing and inspiring a person he is, it was an absolute pleasure meeting him and also, I got a chance to talk about Debian LTS in more detail. [...] I had almost no idea what to do next, so the next month I stayed silent, observing the workflow as people kept committing and announcing updates. And finally in September, I started triaging and fixing the CVEs for Jessie and Stretch (mostly the former). Thanks to Abhijith who explained the basics of what DLA is and how do we go about fixing bugs and then announcing them. With that, I could fix a couple of CVEs and thanks to Holger (again) for reviewing and sponsoring the uploads! :D

  • Ubucon Europe 2019 in local media

    News from the new Ubuntu distribution, the exploration of the several platforms and many “how to”, rule the 4-days agenda where the open source and open technologies are in the air. The Olga Cadaval Cultural centre in Sintra, is the main stage of a busy agenda filled with several talks and more technical sessions, but at Ubucon Europe there’s also room for networking and cultural visits, a curious fusion between spaces full of history, like the Pena Palace or the Quinta da Regaleira, and one of the youngest “players” in the world of software. For 4 days, the international Ubuntu Community gathers in Sintra for an event open to everyone, where the open source principles and open technology are dominating. The Ubucon Europe Conference begun Thursday, October 10th, and extends until Sunday, October 13th, keeping an open doors policy to everyone who wants to Afterall, what is the importance of Ubucon? The number of participants, which should be around 150, doesn’t tell the whole story of what you can learn during these days, as the SAPO TEK had the opportunity to check this morning. Organised by the Ubuntu Portugal Community, with the National Association for Open Software, the Ubuntu Europe Federation and the Sintra Municipality, the conference brings to Portugal some of the biggest open source specialists and shows that Ubuntu is indeed alive, even if not yet known by most people, and still far from the “world domain” aspired by some.

Devices/Embedded: Win Enterprises and Raspberry Pi 4

  • Win Enterprises unveils Atom-based LAN gateway and compact SBC

    Win Enterprises unveiled a fanless “PL-82000” networking gateway with 6x GbE and 2x SFP ports based on an Atom C3000. It also launched a Raspberry Pi sized “MB-5000” SBC that runs Ubuntu or Win 10 on Intel Apollo Lake. We tend to forget Win Enterprises because as its name suggests, the company typically sticks to Windows-supported products. Yet, they have increasingly produced barebones products without listed OS support, such as the new PL-82000 networking appliance, as well as Linux supported systems such as the MB-5000 SBC announced back in June. (In 2017, we covered an Intel Bay Trail based MB-80580 SBC and Win IoT-380 Gateway with Linux support.)

  • Raspberry Pi 4 PCI Express: It actually works! USB3, SATA… GPUs?

    Recently, Tomasz Mloduchowski posted a popular article on his blog detailing the steps he undertook to get access to the hidden PCIe interface of Raspberry Pi 4: the first Raspberry Pi to include PCIe in its design. After seeing his post, and realizing I was meaning to go buy a Raspberry Pi 4, it just seemed natural to try and replicate his results in the hope of taking it a bit further. I am known for Raspberry Pi Butchery, after all.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 B+ - PCI Express

    Why did I do it? Because I wanted to see if it can be done. Because Raspberry Pi 4 might be the cheapest device that is PCIe capable after a relatively minor modification (if I didn't lift the capacitors when desoldering the VL805, this is literally 12 soldering points). That, in turn, can be quite handy for developing own PCIe cores for various FPGA based experiments.

    I'm sharing it to allow people to learn from this - and to dispel the myth that PCIe is somehow out of reach of hobbyists due to some concerns over signal integrity or complexities. Stay tuned for more Pi4/PCIe experimentation!

OSS: Odoo, WordPress, MongoDB vs. MySQL

  • What's New in Odoo 13?

    Fast, Simple and Effective Business Management- this is the motto of Odoo, the leading open source ERP of the globe. And this is what makes Odoo the prominent and most favorite choice among business enterprises. With the release of Odoo 13, the open-source ERP has become all more fit and robust to meet the diversified needs of businesses. With Odoo 13 users can go along with better designs and customizations. With each version release, Odoo makes it a point to bring in major and minor improvements in the application, alongside a set of new features for improving the user interface and functionality of the user. The users worth 3.4 million is the evidence of Odoo being the finest application for business management.

  • Becoming Better Digital Citizens Through Open Source

    The WordPress Project is on a mission to democratize publishing. As WordPress empowers more people to participate in the digital space, we have the opportunity to make sure that everyone can participate safely and responsibly. Today marks the start of Digital Citizenship Week. We are going to share how open source can be used as a tool for learners (regardless of age) to practice and model the essential parts of being a good digital citizen. [...] Digital Citizenship is for all age groups. Anyone who uses the internet on a computer, mobile device or a TV is a digital citizen. You don’t have to be tech-savvy already, maybe you are taking your first steps with technology. Digital Citizenship Week is a chance to reflect together on our impact on the digital world. It can help us to make our consumption more considered and our interaction friendlier. It enables us to make a positive difference to those around us. All of us can strive (or learn) to become better digital citizens. It can be affected by the access those teaching have had to digital skills and good practice. Adult education classes and community tech hubs play a part in basic tech skill development. Unfortunately, these are not always accessible to those in less populated geographic locations.  Open source communities like WordPress already make a difference in encouraging the principles of digital citizenship, from sharing tech skills to improving security knowledge. They give people an opportunity to learn alongside their peers and many of the resources are available regardless of location, resources, or skills.

  • MongoDB vs. MySQL: How to choose

    During the dot-com bubble in the 1990s, one common software stack for web applications was LAMP, which originally stood for Linux (OS), Apache (web server), MySQL (relational database), and PHP (server programming language). MySQL was the preferred database mostly because it was free open source and had good read performance, which fit well with “Web 2.0” apps that dynamically generated sites from the database. Later the MEAN stack, which stood for MongoDB (document database), Express (web server), AngularJS (front-end framework), and Node.js (back-end JavaScript runtime), came to prominence. The MEAN stack was attractive, among other reasons, because the only language you needed to know was JavaScript. It also needed less RAM than an equivalent LAMP stack.

Security: XML External Entity (XXE) Example and the Latest Patches

  • XML External Entity (XXE) Example

    According to OWASP, an XML External Entity attack is a type of attack against an application that parses XML input. This attack occurs when XML input containing a reference to an external entity is processed by a weakly configured XML parser. This attack may lead to the disclosure of confidential data, denial of service, server side request forgery, port scanning from the perspective of the machine where the parser is located, and other system impacts. If a parser accepts unsanitized XML, we can take advantage of that and send our own crafted external XML payload to exploit our target. This post won’t be long so let’s get into it.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, sdl, and unbound), Debian (clamav, libdatetime-timezone-perl, openssl, tcpdump, and tzdata), Fedora (cutter-re, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, jackson-parent, libapreq2, ming, opendmarc, radare2, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), and SUSE (axis, jakarta-commons-fileupload, kernel, sles12sp3-docker-image, sles12sp4-image, system-user-root, and webkit2gtk3).