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Uncovering the Best Open Source Google Analytics Alternatives

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web

Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of internet data. In a nutshell, it is the study of website visitor behavior. It is the process of using online data to transform a organization from faith-based to data driven.

This type of software helps you generate a holistic view of your business by turning customer interactions into actionable insights. Using reports and dashboards, web analytics software lets you sort, sift and share real-time information to help identify opportunities and issues. Keeping track of web visitors, analyzing traffic sources, measuring sales and conversions are just some of the possibilities.

Google Analytics is an excellent well known free service that lets webmasters and site owners access web analytics data. The web service generates detailed statistics about a website’s traffic and sources. It helps marketers and is the most widely used website statistics service. But the biggest downside with Google Analytics is that your data is controlled and used for Google’s own purposes, not just by you. It is also not an open source solution, with a webmaster or site owner being denied access to the raw data.

There are also many other remote-hosted web analytics services that are well-designed and comprehensive. However, if you want an open source solution where the software is hosted on your own server, there are some good alternatives. Having the software installed on your server means that you retain full control over your data, with the possibility of integrating that data into your own system. This solution might, for example, be important to people who do not want to give Google (or another organization) the invitation to control a large portion of their online activity, or who want to be fully in control of visitor privacy.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled the following list of open source web analytics software.

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Also: ITFirms Lists Top Free, Open-Source Statistical Analysis Software

USDOJ Takes on Google, Mozilla Responds

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
Legal
  • Justice Department Sues Monopolist Google For Violating Antitrust Laws

    oday, the Department of Justice — along with eleven state Attorneys General — filed a civil antitrust lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to stop Google from unlawfully maintaining monopolies through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices in the search and search advertising markets and to remedy the competitive harms. The participating state Attorneys General offices represent Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina, and Texas.

    “Today, millions of Americans rely on the Internet and online platforms for their daily lives. Competition in this industry is vitally important, which is why today’s challenge against Google — the gatekeeper of the Internet — for violating antitrust laws is a monumental case both for the Department of Justice and for the American people,” said Attorney General William Barr. “Since my confirmation, I have prioritized the Department’s review of online market-leading platforms to ensure that our technology industries remain competitive. This lawsuit strikes at the heart of Google’s grip over the internet for millions of American consumers, advertisers, small businesses and entrepreneurs beholden to an unlawful monopolist.”

  • Mozilla Reaction to U.S. v. Google

    Like millions of everyday internet users, we share concerns about how Big Tech’s growing power can deter innovation and reduce consumer choice. We believe that scrutiny of these issues is healthy, and critical if we’re going to build a better internet. We also know from firsthand experience there is no overnight solution to these complex issues. Mozilla’s origins are closely tied to the last major antitrust case against Microsoft in the nineties.

    In this new lawsuit, the DOJ referenced Google’s search agreement with Mozilla as one example of Google’s monopolization of the search engine market in the United States. Small and independent companies such as Mozilla thrive by innovating, disrupting and providing users with industry leading features and services in areas like search. The ultimate outcomes of an antitrust lawsuit should not cause collateral damage to the very organizations – like Mozilla – best positioned to drive competition and protect the interests of consumers on the web.

  • DOJ May Force Google To Sell Chrome To Settle Antitrust Case: Report

    he U.S. Department of Justice may force Google to sell its Chrome browser. The development came after the US Congress’ antitrust report on big tech companies.

    It is also told that the DOJ is targeting Google’s advertising business as well. The prosecutors aim at breaking Google’s monopoly on the $162 billion digital advertising market. Politico reported the development via anonymous sources.

Will Google Stadia Boost Linux Gaming?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Gaming

Following my recent article on Steam Machines, quite a few comments appeared on the interwebs. Among them, someone remarked that my final point about Linux Gaming being too reliant on Valve was missing the fact that Google Stadia exists. And therefore this would be akin to having several companies for which Linux gaming matters.

This is a valid point. I had to address it.

What is Stadia? Stadia is a solution designed by Google to stream games to any device with little latency, as long as such devices have a Google Stadia client, the Chrome web browser or a Chromecast. There is a free tier where you can use Stadia and purchase games as you go, and a Pro version which costs about 10 bucks per month after you buy the Premiere Edition with the controller (129 USD).

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Google Coral Dev Board mini SBC is now available for $100

Filed under
Linux
Google
Hardware
Debian

Google Coral SBC was the first development board with Google Edge TPU. The AI accelerator was combined with an NXP i.MX 8M quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 processor and 1GB RAM to provide an all-in-all AI edge computing platform. It launched for $175, and now still retails for $160 which may not be affordable to students and hobbyists.

[...]

The board runs Debian based Mendel Linux distribution developed by Google for Coral boards and supports TensorFlow Lite and AutoML Vision Edge with the latter enabling “fast, high-accuracy custom image classification models”.

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10 Best Google Drive Clients for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google ecosystem has become an integral part of our daily lives, from Google-powered smartphones to a suite of Google apps like GMAIL are part of our daily lives. In the data-driven world, it is important to keep data secure as well as accessible from everywhere. Well, Google Drive offers that solution in the most efficient way possible. You can securely store all your important data on Google Drive and access it from anywhere by just logging into your google account.Like other apps in Google Suite, Drive has become a very important cloud storage app in our life. It offers free storage up to 15GB which is more than enough and can be used across GMAIL, Google Photos, and other Google services.

So today I am going to share with you Google Drive clients you can use to access your Google Drive account on Linux and other distributions.

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Google's Android and ChromeOS Get CrossOver and WireGuard

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • CrossOver 20 for Chrome OS uses the Linux container to enable Windows app support on Chromebooks

    Over the past several years, Google has slowly turned Chrome OS into a more powerful computing platform, allowing people to use Progressive Web Apps, Android apps, and even Linux apps. While Google is working on its own means of bringing Windows app support to Chrome OS, third-party companies like CodeWeavers have released solutions that Chromebook users can take advantage of today. Today, CodeWeavers released CrossOver 20, bringing Windows app support out of beta for Chrome OS.

  • Google adds WireGuard VPN to Android 12's Linux Kernel 5.4 Tree

    With remote work becoming the norm at many businesses thanks to COVID-19, it’s more important than ever to secure network connections with a virtual private network, or VPN. There are multiple VPN tunneling protocols that services can make use of, but a relatively new implementation called WireGuard has taken the tech world by storm. As we’ve explained before, WireGuard is a next-gen VPN protocol that embraces modern cryptography standards and has a secure, auditable code base. After its inclusion in Linux Kernel 5.6, Google is now adding support for the protocol to Android 12’s Linux Kernel 5.4 tree.

    Google forks each Linux Kernel release to include “patches of interest to the Android community that haven’t been merged onto mainline or Long Term Supported (LTS) kernels.” These kernels are called Android Common Kernels and they form the basis of the Linux kernel release that ships on each and every Android device on the market today. For each Android release, Google supports a handful of Linux kernel releases; for Android 11, that’s currently Linux Kernel versions 4.14 and 4.19, while for Android 12, it’ll be versions 4.19 and 5.4.

  • Android 12 Appears To Support Using WireGuard - Phoronix

    WireGuard has long been available as an app on the Google Play store for those wishing to use this cross-platform, open-source secure VPN tunnel solution on Google's mobile operating system. But for Android 12 it appears there will be a form of official support.

    With WireGuard 1.0 marked by the kernel module being upstreamed in Linux 5.6, it looks like Google is now more comfortable in shipping WireGuard for their Android kernel.

Chrome OS 86 Rolls Out with Linux Support for Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster”

Filed under
Google

Based on the latest Google Chrome 86 web browser released last week, Chrome OS 86 adds quite a bunch of interesting changes, starting with Linux support for upgrading to the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series.

If you’re using the Linux support in Chrome OS, which is still in beta stages of development, you will see a new option in Linux settings after updating to Chrome OS 86 that lets you upgrade the base system from Debian GNU/Linux 9 “Stretch” to Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster.”

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Server: Knative, eBPF, and Kubernetes Steering Committee Election Results

Filed under
Server
Google

     

  • Google Set to Unleash Knative - SDxCentral

    Google is set to give up most control over the Knative Project by electing a steering committee to oversee the direction of the Kubernetes-based serverless project. The decision comes on the heels of Google taking a more controversial approach with the Istio service mesh project.

    Protocol first reported on Google’s plans for the Knative Project late last week.

    In a blog post, Paul Morie, writing on behalf of the Knative Steering Committee, explained that it had recently constructed a new steering committee charter that will include an upcoming election for five steering committee members. The plan calls for the five members to serve as individuals and not representing their employer. The plan also states that no vendor will be allowed to have a majority of seats on the steering committee.

    The project will also set up a new Knative Trademark Committee to deal with trademark issues. That committee will initially include members from Google, IBM/Red Hat, and VMware.

  •    

  • Using eBPF Monitoring to Know What to Measure and Why - Container Journal

    eBPF enables users to trace application activity down to a very low level for better performance analysis

    Let’s say you’re a doctor. You know that the human body is tremendously complex, with multiple systems operating and interacting simultaneously. You also understand that sometimes things can go wrong and a person gets sick. Or there might be symptoms that history suggests are potential signs of trouble. How do you determine what is going on? What metrics can you collect that will reveal medically valuable information? And what tools are available to do that?

    The same issue that has challenged physicians for centuries is one that IT professionals now face: When you’re troubleshooting a complex system, what diagnostics do you measure, how do you measure them and what do you do with your findings?

    [...]

    eBPF programs run inside the kernel; they are attached to a code path and whenever that code path is traversed, the program executes. This decoupling of the kernel and eBPF program increases the development time as the developer doesn’t have to recompile the kernel each time the eBPF program is changed. eBPF is useful for both packet processing as well as performance analysis and monitoring, as eBPF programs can be attached to tracepoints, kprobes and even perf events. As you may have already guessed, attaching user-space programs inside the kernel can cause serious security and stability issues; thus, a series of tests are performed on each eBPF program before it’s loaded.

  •  

  • Kubernetes Blog: Announcing the 2020 Steering Committee Election Results

    The 2020 Steering Committee Election is now complete. In 2019, the committee arrived at its final allocation of 7 seats, 3 of which were up for election in 2020. Incoming committee members serve a term of 2 years, and all members are elected by the Kubernetes Community.

    This community body is significant since it oversees the governance of the entire Kubernetes project. With that great power comes great responsibility. You can learn more about the steering committee’s role in their charter.

Web Alternatives, Chrome, Mozilla, and More

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Simplify your web experience with this internet protocol alternative

    If you've been on the internet for a very long time or you're just very resourceful, you might remember an early text-sharing protocol called Gopher. Gopher was eventually displaced by the HTTP protocol, which of course is the basis for the modern World Wide Web. For many people, the "internet" and the "World Wide Web" are the same thing, because many people don't consciously do anything online that's not on the www subdomain.

    But there have always been a variety of network protocols to share information over an interconnected network: Telnet, FTP, SSH, Torrent, GNUnet, and many more. Recently, there's been an addition to this collection of alternatives, and it's called Gemini.

    The Gemini protocol, named after the space mission between the rudimentary experiments of Project Mercury and Project Apollo, is meant to sit peacefully between Gopher and HTTP. It doesn't aim to replace the modern web, by any means, but it does try to create both a simplified web and a modernized Gopher.

  • Browse the web using Gemini on your Apple device

    Lately, I've been checking out pages on the nascent Gemini protocol, a new application-level protocol for hypertext documents. It falls somewhere between the minimalism of Gopher and the complexity and weight of the World Wide Web.

  • Chrome 86 Released With Native File-System, WebCodecs APIs

    Chrome 86 is out today as the latest feature release to Google's cross-platform web browser.

  • about:Mozilla's #introduction channel - and how it could work for your project

    Mozilla is a large community, with dozens of projects, from Firefox front-end to localization to addons.mozilla.org to Firefox Hubs to support.mozilla.org, etc. Unsurprisingly, we have many communication channels. Bugzilla and Phabricator, Github issues and Pull Requests, Matrix/Riot/Element (formerly IRC) and Discourse, etc.

  • Get ready for virtual Halloween with Mozilla Hubs

    Halloween is around the corner and like everything in 2020, it’s probably going to be different this year. Meeting up with friends is fraught, dunking for apples is right out, and going door-to-door for candy?

    [...]

    Hosting a virtual Halloween party in Hubs is easy. Visit the Hubs website, and click on “Create a Room.” A Hubs room is where you’ll invite your friends to gather. As you enter the room, you’ll need to grant mic permission so that your friends will be able to hear you talk.

  • This Week in Glean: FOG progress report

    About a year ago chutten started the "This Week in Glean" series with an initial blog post about Glean on Desktop. Back then we were just getting started to bring Glean to Firefox Desktop. No code had been written for Firefox Desktop, no proposals had been written to discuss how we even do it.

    Now, 12 months later, after four completed milestones, a dozen or so proposal and quite a bit of code, the Project Firefox on Glean (FOG) is finally getting into a stage where we can actually use and test it. It's not ready for prime time yet, but FOG is enabled in Firefox Nightly already.

    Over the past 4 weeks I've been on and off working on building out our support for a C++ and a JavaScript API. Soon Firefox engineers will be able to instrument their code using Glean. In C++ this will look like:

Enjoy YouTube Without YouTube

Filed under
Google
Software

Enjoying YouTube without YouTube means you can watch and download all videos from it everywhere by alternative ways so that you don't run nonfree software or surrender your privacy. There are good news I want to share with you as there are already Invidious and CloudTube for computer users while NewPipe for phone users. They are all free libre open source software developed by community you can trust. I am happy with these solution so I want you to share my happiness as well. Enjoy!

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WordPress 5.6 Second Beta and WordPress Survey

  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 2 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 beta 2 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site.

  • News – Take the 2020 WordPress Annual Survey (and view the 2019 results)! – WordPress.org

    For many years, WordPress enthusiasts have filled out an annual survey to share their experiences and feelings about WordPress. Interesting results from this survey have been shared in the annual State of the Word address and/or here on WordPress News. This survey helps those who build WordPress understand more about how the software is used, and by whom. The survey also helps leaders in the WordPress open source project learn more about our contributors’ experience. To ensure that your WordPress experience is represented in the 2020 survey results, Take the 2020 Annual Survey! (English) You can also take the survey in French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish! The survey will be open for at least 6 weeks, and results will be posted on this blog. [...] The WordPress Professionals group consists of those who: work for a company that designs/develops websites; use WordPress to build websites and/or blogs for others; design or develop themes, plugins, or other custom tools for WordPress sites; or are a designer, developer, or other web professional working with WordPress. This WordPress Professionals group is further divided into WordPress Company Pros (those who work for a company that designs/develops websites) and WordPress Freelancers/Hobbyists (all other professional types) subgroups.

FreeBSD 12.2

  • FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE. This is the third release of the stable/12 branch.

  • October 2020

    27 October: FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE is now available. Please be sure to check the Release Notes and Release Errata before installation for any late-breaking news and/or issues with 12.2. More information about FreeBSD releases can be found on the Release Information page.

Also: This summer in KDE-FreeBSD | [bobulate]

Games: Stadia, Graveyard Keeper and Wildermyth

  • Stadia Pro for November has Sniper Elite 4, Risk of Rain 2, Republique and new releases | GamingOnLinux

    Google has announced the latest set of Stadia Pro games, along with new titles about to release like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and Watch Dogs: Legion. PLUS news of Ubisoft+ coming to Stadia soon. What is Stadia? A quick primer for people not following: it's a game streaming service that uses Debian Linux under the hood along with the Vulkan graphics API. Playable on Linux in Chromium / Chrome browsers. You can either buy games, or subscribe to Stadia Pro to claim games each month (or do both).

  • Graveyard Keeper - Game Of Crone expansion is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Graveyard Keeper - Game Of Crone is an expansion to the medieval graveyard building and management sim that's like a morbid take on Stardew. This fresh expansion adds in another bunch of hours (6-12 they said approximately) to play through, along with a whole new story to follow where you help a bunch of escaped prisoners build up a camp. "You’ll have to help the escaped prisoners of the Inquisition survive in the wilderness by providing them with everything they need. To develop their camp to a fortified settlement while keeping in mind its benefits. To protect those who entrusted you with their lives, from the sword and fire. And also - to untangle the circumstances of the cruel game, which turned into the Great Blast and the return of the Ancient Curse."

  • Papercraft styled tactical-RPG 'Wildermyth' has a big new campaign out | GamingOnLinux

    Wildermyth is the character-driven, procedurally-generated tactical RPG with an art style resembling papercraft and it's brilliant. Now it's also bigger with a big campaign update out. In Wildermyth you play through various generated campaigns, each of which mixes things up like characters and events and so every play-through is different. You're supposed to see it as something resembling a classic tabletop RPG experience. Mixing together a party-based RPG with overworld exploration, random events and tactical turn-based combat there's a lot to love about it.

  • Godot Web export progress report #3

    Howdy Godotters! It's-a me! Fabio! It is time for an update on the Godot export for the Web. In the last few months, a lot has been going on regarding the Godot export for the Web. Most of the enhancements mentioned in the previous report have now been merged into the master branch, and backported to 3.2 (included in 3.2.4 beta 1). This sadly does not yet include the virtual keyboard support, since implementing it without impacting the experience on touchscreen-enabled devices that also have a physical keyboard has proven harder than expected. There is great news, though, on the other topic mentioned in that report, which is... GDNative support on HTML5 exports! Additionally, a new prototype version of the Godot Web Editor is now available for you to try out.

Android Leftovers