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Ubuntu

How’s my snap faring on different distributions?

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Ubuntu

The life of an application can roughly be divided into two: everything that happens before it goes live – building, packaging, publication – and then, everything that happens after that milestone. Traditionally, on Linux, developers didn’t always have an easy way of deriving useful numbers on how their software was doing across the distrospace. Indeed, the ability to understand one’s audience’s needs, and then react to them, perhaps by improving a product, or making changes that would help grow the usage, is an important part of the software lifecycle. The question is, how (and if) can you do that with snaps?

Enter the Store

Last year, we had a pretty thorough overview of the Snap Store, and the different functionalities it offers to publishers. If you have an account, and you’ve published a snap or three, you can configure and modify a whole range of settings and options for your applications. For instance, you can upload screenshots and videos, add collaborators, trigger builds, publicize your work, and check the metrics.

By default, the metrics page displays a 30-day weekly active devices count, and a breakdown by application version. This gives you a good understanding of the overall behavior of the systems using snap. You can increase the window to get a longer view of the trends.

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Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Will Reach End Of Life on July 22nd, 2021

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Ubuntu

Released eight months ago on October 22nd, 2021, Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) was the first release of the popular Linux distribution to offer Raspberry Pi 4 desktop images, transforming the tiny single-board computer into a powerful workstation for all your daily computing needs. Check out my review of Ubuntu 20.10 on Raspberry Pi 4 to see it in action.

Ubuntu 20.10 shipped with the Linux 5.8 kernel series, nftables as default firewall backend instead of iptables, support for Active Directory (AD) logins, support for Ubuntu Certified devices, the GNOME 3.38 desktop environment, and much more.

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Regolith Linux 1.6 Released with Versions Based on Ubuntu 21.04 and 20.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Regolith Linux 1.6 is available in two versions: one based on based on Ubuntu 21.04 (which means it has a new Linux kernel, a tonne of bug and security fixes, plus access to a fresher set of software through the stock Ubuntu repos), and one based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

If you’re not familiar with Regolith I can bring you up to speed quickly: take a solid Ubuntu foundation and lay a powerful, bespoke keyboard-centric UI (i3-gaps) on top. The end result: a quirky Ubuntu based distro like no other.

A couple of new “Looks” are available to users of Regolith Linux 1.6: a ‘solarized light’ theme; and a dark midnight theme. Regolith Looks are composed of a GTK theme, icon set, wallpaper, and even layout tweaks. Looks are installed through the command line as packages and enabled/changing using (what else) a keyboard shortcut — the alt + super + l shortcut to be specific.

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Ubuntu and Canonical Leftovers

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Ubuntu

  • Two-factor authentication coming to Ubuntu One [Ed: The brand Ubuntu One is back... just to confuse people]

    Two factor authentication (2FA) increases your account security further than just using a username and password. In addition to a password (the first factor), you need another factor to access your account. A great example to demonstrate this is when you withdraw money from an ATM. To access your bank account you need both your physical bank card and to know your PIN number. These are the two factors you need to withdraw money = 2 factor authentication!

    Common ways to provide this extra level of security are a specific application on your phone or computer, a physical security key/USB (Yubikey, for example), or a smart card. By using more than one of these factors, you can greatly increase the security of your account or system.

    [...]

    After many years in beta, we have created a comprehensive code recovery experience. Following this, we are happy to announce that we will be implementing 2FA for all Ubuntu One accounts. This change is coming in the next few weeks, so keep your eyes peeled for instructions on how to enable 2FA for your account. With a reliable backup mode of authentication, lockouts should be a thing of the past.

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  • 5 awesome backup services that support FTP, Rsync and SCP

    Some weeks ago I wrote about backing up your important files on Ubuntu to Google Drive. It’s a trivial process that will save your hide on the day disaster strikes. You lose your laptop unexpectedly for example or you fall prey to a ransomware gang as has become trendy these days. But what if for some reason you cannot use Google Drive? What should you do?

    I found myself in such a situation recently. While in the process of trying to add a new tool to my webhost, I later discovered the tool was not meant for sites in Zimbabwe and wanted it removed from my hosting platform. I wrote an email to the web hosts support with this request and the person who answered the ticket was a French guy. English is not his first language and he thought I wanted out of their service. He wanted to delete everything. I mean everything including the backups they had of my sites.

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  • Design and Web team summary – 4 June 2021

    The web team at Canonical run two-week iterations building and maintaining all of Canonical websites and product web interfaces. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

    Meet the team

    My name is Beth Collins and I’m a Web Engineer in the Web squad. We work on maintaining Canonical’s sites and also some web based projects. I started at Canonical in September 2020, since then it’s been a steep learning curve (in a good way) – with some exciting projects to get my teeth stuck into.

    I actually studied dentistry at university, and worked in the field for a couple of years before I realised it wasn’t for me (not your usual career change – I know). But it’s surprising how many similarities there are, problem solving is problem solving whether it’s teeth or code! 

    When I’m not working I love running, dancing to old school disco music, going to festivals, going climbing and the occasional cold water wild swim (dip). In the past 5 years I’ve travelled and lived in many places all over the world, including Melbourne, Hanoi, India, Barcelona, but have settled and now live in a small town on the border of Wales called Oswestry.

Ubuntu: Oracle, LF, and More

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Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Version check command and 5 Easy Steps explained

    Do you log in to an Ubuntu Operating System fist time? and you don’t know what Ubuntu version is running on?. It is a good command for the ubuntu version check step by step guide. If you are a beginner, you can use it.

    When you install Ubuntu on your system, what version it is. To know more about Ubuntu install please check my previous article How to install Ubuntu on Virtualbox. but what happened after upgrading your system, A new version will be installed and the old version will disappear.

    Right now, the situation is the same as the unknown system you are using. Now your next task to check Ubuntu version.

  • Ubuntu Supports Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Ampere A1 Compute - Database Trends and Applications

    Oracle and Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, have announced Ubuntu support for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) Ampere A1 Compute. Combining the benefits of Ubuntu, a popular cloud operating system, with the performance of Oracle's new offering, the companies say, enterprises can now run traditional workloads in a cost-optimized fashion.

    The ARM-based platform is also well-suited for new use cases, such as Canonical’s solution Anbox Cloud, which allows organizations to run Android in the cloud at scale and securely. Ubuntu on OCI Ampere A1 is available as a platform image in the OCI console now.

  • Canonical presents EdgeX to the community | Ubuntu

    With a longstanding commitment to Edge and IoT applications, Canonical has historically placed great emphasis on EgdeX – a set of microservices that enable developers to build apps that run at the edge and act as a middleware connecting the things and the cloud .

    It’s no surprise that Canonical has also been supporting the EdgeX Foundry – the open source, vendor neutral LF Edge platform for middleware Edge IoT.

    This year, we’re excited to be sharing two presentations with the community, to help share knowledge and ideas around EdgeX. They’re naturally open to all, so go ahead and download EdgeX (if you haven’t already), and join us!

  • GMK NucBox Review - A palm-sized Windows 10 mini PC - CNX Software

    Whilst a detailed comparison between the two operating systems is beyond the scope of this review, it is worth noting some of the key findings I observed. Looking at the performance tools common between the two OS showed that they were reasonably evenly matched.

    However, as the fan is not detected under Ubuntu and video playback on WIndows runs better than on Ubuntu, given the price includes a Windows 10 Home license it probably doesn’t make too much sense to use the device as a Linux HTPC.

Linux for Starters: Your Guide to Linux – 8 Things to do after installing Ubuntu – Part 5

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Ubuntu

This is a series that offers a gentle introduction to Linux for newcomers.

After installing Ubuntu, you’re ready to use your new system. But there are some additional steps we recommend you first perform before using your new system. This article identifies 8 things you need to consider.

Let’s start with a no-brainer, an update of the system.

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Introducing Ubuntu Pro for Google Cloud

Filed under
Server
Google
Ubuntu
  • Introducing Ubuntu Pro for Google Cloud | Ubuntu

    Canonical and Google Cloud today announce Ubuntu Pro on Google Cloud, a new Ubuntu offering available to all Google Cloud users. Ubuntu Pro on Google Cloud allows instant access to security patching covering thousands of open source applications for up to 10 years and critical compliance features essential to running workloads in regulated environments.

    Google Cloud has long partnered with Canonical to offer innovative developer solutions, from desktop to Kubernetes and AI/ML. In the vein of this collaboration, Google Cloud and Canonical have created a more secure, hardened, and cost-effective devops environment: Ubuntu Pro on Google Cloud for all enterprises to accelerate their cloud adoption.

  • Ubuntu Pro launches for Google Cloud - TechRepublic

    Canonical's Ubuntu Pro is making its debut on another cloud-based service. On Monday, Canonical and Google announced the availability of Ubuntu Pro for all Google Cloud users. A premium version of Ubuntu geared for developers and administrators at enterprises, Ubuntu Pro offers a secure DevOps environment with instant security patching, 10-year support, and compliance for regulated applications and workloads.

  • Google + Canonical Bring Ubuntu Pro To Google Cloud - Phoronix

    At the end of 2019 "Ubuntu Pro" was announced as Ubuntu for Amazon's EC2 cloud with ten years of package updates/security, kernel livepatching, Canonical Landscape integration, and more. Google and Canonical are announcing today that Ubuntu Pro is now coming to Google Cloud.

    Ubuntu Pro is now available with Google Cloud as their premium version of Ubuntu over the standard Ubuntu Linux distribution that has always been available via Google's public cloud.

Ubuntu vs. Lubuntu: Everything you need to know

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The availability of several Ubuntu open-source Linux distribution variants is one reason why Ubuntu has remained so popular for so long. However, picking the right one for your needs is critical when it comes to PC operating systems. Thus, we compare the original Ubuntu with the most common Ubuntu flavor, Lubuntu, in this post, highlighting both similarities and differences.

Despite the variation in their names, all of these are based on the same Ubuntu operating system. As a result, the Linux kernel and low-level machine utilities are the same in both. However, each one of them has its desktop and flavor-specific applications. As a result, some are more feature-rich, while others are more lightweight, giving each a unique feel.

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, NFV, and UBports

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 686

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 686 for the week of May 30 – June 5, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • How to accelerate migration towards NFV with Open Source MANO

    Network Function Virtualization (NFV) and Cloud native network functions continue to draw immense attention from the telecom sector. From the beginning, virtualisation is trying to fulfill the promises of reducing CapEx and OpEx by decoupling Network Functions from the underlying infrastructure and ensuring flexibility and scalability. However, despite the huge traction it has gained, there are still obstacles to overcome before it can be part of day-to-day operations.

    One of the important challenges associated with this transformation is implementing the process for management and orchestration of network functions. Telcos need to build virtualized network functions while maintaining a high quality of service and keeping up with a constantly evolving technology landscape. The 5G stage will likely last for the next 5-8 years before the transition to 6G, and so on. The switch to a new generation network is costly, and if the average revenue per user does not grow as fast as CapEx, telcos will not be able to maintain profitability.

  • UBports: Packaging of Lomiri Operating Environment for Debian (part 05)

    Before and during FOSDEM 2020, I agreed with the people (developers, supporters, managers) of the UBports Foundation to package the Unity8 Operating Environment for Debian. Since 27th Feb 2020, Unity8 has now become Lomiri.

Ubuntu and Fedora Community

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Kubernetes and Ubuntu in Italy

    At the beginning of May, the speakers & moderators of the event organized by Canonical went to the Italian virtual space and enjoyed the presence of experts from DXC, GARR, and Canonical, who shared with us their knowledge about multi-cloud infrastructure.

  • Pausing Aaron Farias Martinez’s involvement in Ubuntu

    With regret, we have to inform you that Aaron Farias Martinez’s involvement in the Ubuntu Community will be on pause for an indefinite period of time. After discussions, the Community Council saw no other course of action but to ask him to refrain from his activities in the project, which did not reflect behavior acceptable in the Ubuntu Community.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Help make Fedora awesome by taking the first Annual Contributor Survey!

    The Fedora Council is running the first Annual Fedora Contributor Survey and we want to hear from you! The survey will be open to take for the month of June, and there is a shiny Fedora Badge to earn. Our goal is to gather authentic and valuable feedback to better support the Fedora contributor community. We plan to analyze the results and share findings at Nest with Fedora, 2021. Take the Annual Fedora Contributor Survey today!

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More in Tux Machines

Here’s Why Switching to Linux Makes Sense in 2021

Linux does have several benefits over Windows and macOS in certain areas. People are realizing it, and it is slowly gaining popularity in the desktop OS market. Of course, the majority of desktop users still swear by Windows or macOS, but a greater number of users are trying out new Linux distributions to see if they can switch to Linux. They may have heard good things about Linux as a desktop choice, or just want to try something different while confined to their homes. Who knows? Here, I will be presenting you all the good reasons why Linux makes more sense in 2021. Read more

today's leftovers

  • LHS Episode #416: The Weekender LXXIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Donation button removed

    Over the years, I have blown hot and cold over whether to have a donation button. Did take it down for awhile, about a year ago I think. I received an email asking if can send me a bank cheque, which reminded me about that donation button. I declined the offer. I really don't need donations. It is really my pleasure to upload blog reports about EasyOS, Puppy, DIY hiking gear, and all the rest that have posted about. Ibiblio.org is still very kindly hosting downloads, and I also went back to the Puppy Forum.

  • Akademy 2021 – I

    I am still digesting the load of information that Marc Mutz gave in his intense training session last night between 6 and almost 11 p.m. about C++/STL history, containers, iterators, allocators, the Non-Owning Interface Idiom and all that other good stuff. Great job Marc.

  • Stuck Updates Fix

    When rolling out a new feature that lets you skip (offline) updates on boot-up earlier this week we have messed up and also brought in a nasty bug that prevents updates from applying. Unfortunately we can’t automatically rectify this problem because, well, updates are never applied. In case you find Discover showing the same updates over and over again, even after rebooting to apply the update, you may be affected.

  • AWS SSM Parameters

    If you are not familiar with the Parameter Store it provides hierarchical storage for config data, strings, and other values. As well as being used for storing private information the parameter store provides a public namespace for SUSE, /aws/service/suse, which is now being leveraged to provide the latest image id’s for all active SUSE images.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Steam on ChromeOS: Not a Rumor Anymore - Boiling Steam

    If you follow us or other sources like Chrome Unboxed you are by now aware that there’s ample rumors about Google/Valve working on bringing Steam on ChromeOS. We know the technology pieces are there, as recently discussed with Luke Short in our recent podcast. However, we are still waiting for an official announcement that would turn the expected rumors into reality.

  • First American Financial Pays Farcical $500K Fine

    In May 2019, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that the website of mortgage settlement giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] was leaking more than 800 million documents — many containing sensitive financial data — related to real estate transactions dating back 16 years. This week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settled its investigation into the matter after the Fortune 500 company agreed to pay a paltry penalty of less than $500,000.

  • How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

    Estonia is no stranger to the cyber threat posed by Russia. Back in 2007, a decision to relocate a Soviet-era war memorial from central Tallinn to a military cemetery sparked a diplomatic spat with its neighbor and former overlord. There were protests and angry statements from Russian diplomats. And just as the removal works started, Estonia became the target of what was at the time the biggest cyberattack against a single country.

    The Estonian government called the incident an act of cyberwarfare and blamed Russia for it. Moscow has denied any involvement.

    The attack made Estonia realize that it needed to start treating cyber threats in the same way as physical attacks.

  • Most Businesses That Pay Off After Ransomware Hack Hit With Second Attack: Study [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The study surveyed nearly 1,300 security professionals around the world and found that 80 percent of businesses that paid after a ransomware attack suffered a second attack. Of those hit a second time, 46 percent believed it came from the same group that did the first attack.

    Censuswide, which performed the study on behalf of the international cybersecurity company Cybereason, found that 25 percent of organizations hit by a ransomware attack were forced to close. In addition, 29 percent were forced to eliminate jobs.

Kernel: Oracle, UPower, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Oracle Sends Out Latest Linux Patches So Trenchboot Can Securely Launch The Kernel - Phoronix

    Trenchboot continues to be worked on for providing boot integrity technologies that allow for multiple roots of trust around boot security and integrity. Oracle engineers on Friday sent out their latest Linux kernel patches so it can enjoy a "Secure Launch" by the project's x86 dynamic launch measurements code. The latest kernel patches are a second revision to patches sent out last year around the Trenchboot launch support for enhancing the integrity and security of the boot process. This kernel work goes along with Trenchboot support happening for GRUB.

  • Nearly A Decade Later, UPower Still Working Towards 1.0 Release

    For nearly one decade there has been talk of UPower 1.0 while in 2021 that still has yet to materialize for this former "DeviceKit-Power" project but at least now there is UPower v0.99.12 as the first release in two years. UPower 1.0 has yet to materialize and it certainly isn't advancing these days like it was in the early 2010s. With Thursday's UPower 0.99.12 release the key changes to land over the past two years are supporting more device types and power reporting for newer Apple iPhone smartphones like the iPhone XR, XS, and other newer models.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. Tracing in the Linux kernel is constantly improving. Tracing was officially added to Linux in 2008. Since then, more tooling has been constantly added to help out with visibility. The work is still ongoing, with Perf, ftrace, Lttng, and eBPF. User space tooling is expanding and as the kernel gets more complex, so does the need for facilitating seeing what is going on under the hood.