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Ubuntu

Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

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Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), the new Linux kernel security updates are here to patch more than 30 security vulnerabilities, including a heap buffer overflow discovered in the Marvell Wireless LAN device driver and a NULL pointer dereference discovered in the Near-field communication (NFC) implementation.

The security patch also addresses a use-after-free vulnerability discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the Linux kernel when accessing LDT entries, as well as a race condition when performing core dumps. A flaw discovered by Andrei Vlad Lutas and Dan Lutas in x86 processors, which incorrectly handled SWAPGS instructions during speculative execution, was fixed as well.

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The Best App Launchers for Ubuntu & Linux Mint

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Software
Ubuntu

So, thankfully, there is a world of alternative app launchers for Linux desktops — launchers that are more traditional, more interactive, and/or often more capable than what Ubuntu includes out of the box.

Inspired by my recent play with rofi on the Regolith desktop I decided to test a bunch of ’em to compile this: a list of the best app launchers for Ubuntu and Linux Mint (in my opinion, of course).

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Feral GameMode on Ubuntu: Everything You Need to Know

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Ubuntu

Feral GameMode is a discreet background utility that aims to improve gaming performance on Linux distributions like Ubuntu.

It’s not a GUI app; there’s no multi-button dashboard, no toggle-fest, and no real feedback on how it’s running.

Games compatible with GameMode are able to ‘request’ that a specific set of tweaks are applied to the host system and/or the game process(es) for a short period.

These tweaks ensure system resources prioritise the gaming experience over other tasks, like drawing your desktop background or checking for updates.

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Upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Part 2: Releases

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Knowing Ubuntu releases is important to understand it better. Ubuntu is released twice a year, more precisely, every April and October, hence the number 04 and 10 in every version. It has special release called Long Term Support (LTS) released once in two years, only when the year number is even, hence all LTS version numbers are ended with 04. More importantly, you will also see 3 different periods of Ubuntu Desktop, that have been going through GNOME2, Unity, and GNOME3 eras, with OpenOffice.org and then LibreOffice as the main office suite. You will also see Ubuntu siblings like Kubuntu and Mythbuntu. I hope this will be interesting enough for everybody to read. Go ahead, and learn more about Ubuntu!

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8 Ways Snaps are Different

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Ubuntu

Depending on the audience, the discussion of software packaging elicits very different responses. Users generally don’t care how software is packaged, so long as it works. Developers typically want software packaging as a task to not burden them and just magically happen. Snaps aren’t magic, but aim to achieve both ease of maintenance and transparency in use.

Most software packaging systems differ only a little in file format, tools used in their creation and methods of discovery and delivery. Snaps come with a set of side benefits beyond just delivering bytes in a compressed file to users. In this article, we’ll cover just 8 of the ways in which snaps improve upon existing Linux software packaging.

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A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

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Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Orange Pi Zero2 is a Tiny Allwinner H6 SBC with HDMI 2.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet & WiFi

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Debian
Ubuntu

It’s always frustrating to see boards with USB 3.0 and Fast Ethernet, since there’s no benefit over USB 2.0 for networked storage. But this is usually to cut costs, and in this case the PCB’s size may have been a problem to accommodate the extra transceiver required for Gigabit Ethernet.

Supported operating systems are said to be Android7.0, Ubuntu, and Debian, but this information is not always correct before launch. The good news is that Orange Pi 3 SBC, also powered by Allwinner H6 processor, is supported in Armbian, albeit only with WIP Debian 10 and Ubuntu 18.04 images, meaning they are suitable for testing, but not necessarily stable.

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Source Code Adventure #1: Ubuntu, Launchpad, and Source DVDs

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Ubuntu

I am currently distributing GNU/Linux in Indonesia. As you know, distributing libre software that is licensed under GNU GPL and such other licenses, requires you to distribute the source code too. A question pops up: where to get source code of a GNU/Linux system along with whole source code repository it possesses? For example, where to get Ubuntu's source code DVD and its source code repository? To answer that question, I decided to make a series of notes regarding my search in source code of popular GNU/Linux distros. Criteria I made are (1) whether a distro provides source CD or not, (2) where the official source code packages repo located, (3) where the raw source codes located, and finally (4) how to get them for end users. I also tried to find (5) mirrors of the source code repo. I am starting here with Ubuntu, of course, and next time I will look at Debian, Fedora, openSUSE, and Trisquel. I hope this article and the next ones will help anybody to understand how important the source code is and ease them to distribute free as in freedom software. Enjoy!

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MINIX NEO S2 USB-C SSD Hub Review in Ubuntu 18.04 with Khadas Edge

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Reviews
Ubuntu

MINIX NEO S1 & S2 USB-C hubs are specifically designed for Apple Macbook, Macbook Air, and Macbook Pro, but since they follow USB-C specifications they should work with compatible devices. You must note your experience may vary, as we’ve seen MINIX NEO S2 “works” with Khadas Edge running Ubuntu 18.04 + XFCE, but stability, at least with regards to driving an extra display may be an issue. An external power supply is almost certainly needed unless you only use the product as a USB-C SSD.

MINIX NEO S1 & S2 can be purchased on various shops including GearBest, GeekBuying, and Amazon starting at respectively $79.99 and $97.99.

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Reading ID Card Data in Ubuntu with EZ100PU Smart Card Reader (Thai ID Edition)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

I was asked help with configuring a smart card reader on a government computer running Windows 7, but this made me wonder what would happen if I connected the card reader to my Ubuntu laptop and whether I’d be able to read content from a Thai ID card.

It’s a FAST ID EZ100PU smart card reader compliant with ISO7816 standard. That’s the product page of the specific model, but a search for EZ100PU only reveals the manufacturer may be InfoThink Technology based on Taiwan.

The USB smart card reader comes with a CD that includes drivers for Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and Android, as well as an SDK with a demo program and sample code in C++, Visual Basic .NET, and C#. As we’ll see further below, the Linux driver is not needed as it works out of the box.

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Android Leftovers

Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem. We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository. It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic. Read more

[EndeavourOS] The August release is available.

This ISO contains: Calamares 3.2.11 (the latest version of our installer) Kernel 5.2.8 mesa 19.1.4-1 systemd 242.84-1 xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.16-1 XFCE 4.14 bash-completion broadcom-wl-dkms We also took care of some bug fixes: Autologin is working now (if chosen inside Calamares) Virtualbox detection is working Powersaving/screen-locking issues are resolved Added Leafpad as an option to use the editor as admin (not working with mousepad anymore) A general cleanup Removed light-locker (was causing issues) Read more

Emmabuntus DE2 1.05 Released, Which Reduces ISO Image Size

Emmabuntus Team is pleased to announce the release of the new Emmabuntüs Debian Edition 2 1.05 (32 and 64 bits) on 02nd Aug, 2019. It’s based on Debian 9.9 stretch distribution and featuring the XFCE desktop environment. This is a lightweight distribution, which was designed to run on older computers. This distribution was originally designed to facilitate the reconditioning of computers donated to humanitarian organizations, starting with the Emmaüs communities. Read more