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Reiser

Awkward History of Linux and Latest of Reiser5

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Linux
Reiser
  • Linux in 2020 [Ed: This is clearly conflating the kernel (Linux) with GNU, which predates it by almost one decade. It also perpetuates the myth that only Ubuntu brought GNU/Linux to the masses.]

    Hello. Today I would like to share with you, my perspective of Linux. Please take note that this is all my opinions and the way I see it. If you feel that I missed something very important or have a fact or two wrong, please let me know.

    So Linux was announced for the first time, on the 25 of August 1991 by a Finnish student, called Linus Torvalds. Little did he know, and the world knows that 30 years later the world would be using it on a daily basis.

    So From 1991, Linux has been maturing several Linux Distros (operating systems) came and went away, with a few of the first ones still around today. But it was mainly/only for those who are computer "geeks" and not for everyday users. But that all changed in October 2004, when the first version of Ubuntu was released.

  • Reiser5 Logical Volume Management - Updates
      Reiser5 Logical Volume Management - Updates
    
    
    I am happy to inform, that Logical Volumes stuff has become more
    stable. Also we introduce the following changes, which make logical
    volumes administration more flexible and simple:
    
    
                      1. No balancing by default
    
    
    Now all volume operations except brick removal don't invoke balancing
    by default. Instead, they mark volume as "unbalanced". To complete any
    operation with balancing specify option -B (--with-balance), or run
    volume.reiser4(8) utility with the option -b (--balance) later.
    
    This allows to speed up more than one operations over logical volume
    being performed at once. For example, if you want to add more than one
    brick to your volume at once, first add all the bricks, then run
    balancing. There is no need to balance a volume between the addition
    operations.
    
    
                        2. Removal completion
    
    
    Operation of brick removal always includes balancing procedure as its
    part. This procedure moves out all data block from the brick to be
    removed to remaining bricks of the volume. Thus, brick removal is
    usually a long operation, which may be interrupted for various reasons
    In such cases the volume is automatically marked with an "incomplete
    removal" flag.
    
    It is not allowed to perform essential volume operations on a volume
    marked as "with incomplete removal": first, user should complete
    removal by running volume.reiser4 utility with option
    -R (--finish-removal). Otherwise, the operation will return error
    (-EBUSY).
    
    There is no other restrictions: you are allowed to add a brick to
    unbalanced volume, and even remove a brick from an unbalanced volume
    (assuming it is not incomplete removal).
    
    Comment. "--finish-removal" is a temporary option. In the future the
    file system will detect incomplete removal and automatically perform
    removal completion by itself.
    
    
                    3. Balancing is always defined
    
    
    Operation of volume balancing (regardless of its balanced status) is
    always defined, and can be launched at any moment. If the volume is
    balanced, then the balancing procedure just scans the volume without
    any useful work.
    
    It is allowed to run more than one balancing threads on the same
    volume, however currently it will be inefficient: other threads will
    be always going after the single leader without doing useful work.
    Efficient volume balancing by many threads (true parallelism) is not a
    trivial task. We estimate its complexity as 2/5.
    
    
              4. Restore regular distribution on the volume
    
    
    Custom (defined by user) file migration can break fairness of data
    distribution among the bricks. To restore regular (fair) distribution
    on the volume, run volume.reiser4 utility with the option -S
    (--restore-regular). It launches a balancing procedure, which performs
    mandatory data migration of all files (including the ones marked as
    "immobile") in accordance with regular distribution policy on the
    volume. Moreover, when the balancing procedure encounters a file
    marked as "immobile", its "immobile" flag is cleared up.
    
    
                             5. How to test
    
    
    The new functionality is available starting with the kernel patch
    reiser4-for-linux-5.10-rc3 and reiser4progs-2.0.4 (Software Framework
    Release number of both is 5.1.3).
    
  • Reiser5 Stabilizing Its Logical Volume Functionality - Phoronix

    This New Year's Eve will mark one year since the announcement of the in-development Reiser5 file-system. While the outlook for getting Reiser5 upstreamed into the mainline kernel remains murky given the out-of-tree status of Reiser4, Edward Shishkin does continue advancing this latest Reiser file-system iteration.

    Since last year's initial Reiser5 announcement, more features continue to be ironed out for this evolution of Reiser4. The latest Reiser5 functionality hitting a point of stability is its logical volume management.

Reiser4/Reiser5 Updated For Linux 5.8

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Reiser

Edward Shishkin continues pushing ahead with not only maintaining the existing out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system code but also developing Reiser5 seemingly without any major corporate support. Reiser4 and the experimental Reiser5 file-system code were updated on Monday for Linux 5.8 kernel compatibility.

The Reiser4 kernel driver along with the unstable Reiser5 kernel code saw new patch releases for supporting them on the Linux 5.8 stable kernel (Linux 5.8.1 target to be exact).

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Reiser4/Reiser5 Updated For Linux 5.7 Kernel Compatibility

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Reiser

It was just over a week ago that Reiser4 was updated for Linux 5.6 support while now it's been updated for the newly-minted Linux 5.7 stable kernel along with updating the experimental Reiser5 file-system for this latest kernel series.

Uploaded today by Edward Shishkin was Reiser4 for Linux 5.7.1. Though given the minimal changes with 5.7.1 compared to last week's 5.7 release, the patch presumably should apply cleanly there as well. There are no reports of any other functional Reiser4 changes besides re-basing to the new kernel series.

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Reiser5 Updates For Linux 5.5 Along With Reiser4

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Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 and Reiser5 (Reiser4 v5) patches have been updated against the recently stabilized Linux 5.5 kernel.

Main Reiser4 developer Edward Shishkin re-based the Reiser4 file-system patch against Linux 5.5.1 along with the experimental Reiser5.

At the end of 2019 is when Shishkin announced Reiser5 file-system development with introducing the concepts of local volumes capable of parallel scaling out and other key iterations over the current Reiser4 design.

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Reiser4 File-System Is Still Ticking In 2019 - Now Updated For Linux 5.3 Compatibility

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Linux
Reiser

Edward Shishkin continues near single-handedly maintaining the out-of-tree Reiser4 code that at this point still has no apparent trajectory towards mainline. The former Namesys developer previously indicated it's unlikely to see Reiser4 merged unless there is a company backing it to get it through the review process for merging into mainline. While Reiser4 was quite promising for its early time, it's only getting more difficult with Reiser4 effectively stagnating for years now while SUSE/openSUSE continues backing Btrfs, Ubuntu increasingly investing in ZFS support, Red Hat developing Stratis, XFS continuing to be advanced by Red Hat and others as well, Google continuing to invest in the likes of EXT4/F2FS, and there also being Bcachefs and other open-source storage solutions that are more promising than Reiser4 in 2019. Nevertheless, the out-of-tree kernel patches continue to be updated.

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Reiser4 Brought To The Linux 5.0 Kernel

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Reiser

For those still using the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system, it may be about time to consider alternatives like Btrfs, XFS, ZFS On Linux, F2FS, or even the likes of Stratis and Bcachefs. But should you still be using this once promising file-system, the out-of-tree patches have been revised to now work with the Linux 5.0 kernel.

There still is no trajectory for Reiser4 to the mainline Linux kernel with no major companies or other stakeholders backing Reiser4 but just a small group of developers and enthusiasts left working on this successor to ReiserFS. With the latest code posted on Friday by former Namesys developer Edward Shishkin, the Reiser4 kernel driver has been re-based to the Linux 5.0 kernel but with no other changes to the file-system noted.

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Reiser4 File-System Benchmarks With Linux 4.17

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Reiser

It's been about three years since last carrying out any file-system performance benchmarks of Reiser4, but being curious how it stacks up against the current state of today's mainline Linux file-systems, here are some fresh performance tests of Reiser4 using the Linux 4.17 kernel. The Reiser4 performance was compared to Reiserfs, EXT4, Btrfs, XFS, and F2FS.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.14 & Introduces Zstd Compression Support

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Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system driver has been updated with compatibility for the latest Linux 4.14 stable series. Besides reworking the code to run on Linux 4.14, this controversial file-system has also added support for Zstd file-system compression.

Linux 4.14 introduced Zstd support in the mainline kernel and wired it in for SquashFS and Btrfs. Our Btrfs Zstd benchmarks have been promising for transparent file-system compression compared to the other supported algorithms. Reiser4 has now picked up Zstd compression as an eventual replacement to their Gzip compression support.

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Reiser4 Is Now Ready For Linux 4.13

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Reiser

For those wanting to use the Reiser4 file-system with the just-released Linux 4.13 kernel, patches are already available.

Less than one week after the release of the Linux 4.13 stable kernel, Edward Shishkin has already released an updated patch for the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system for working with this new stable series.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.12, Experimental Data Striping Support

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Reiser

Those using the Reiser4 file-system in some capacity can now safely upgrade to the Linux 4.12 kernel.

Edward Shishkin has updated this out-of-tree file-system for the Linux 4.12 kernel so it can be built with the latest mainline stable release.

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today's leftovers

  • Dave Airlie: crocus misrendering of the week

    The bottom image is crocus vs 965 on top. This only happened on Gen4->5, so Ironlake and GM45 were my test machines. I burned a lot of time trying to work this out. I trimmed the traces down, dumped a stupendous amount of batchbuffers, turned off UBO push constants, dump all the index and vertex buffers, tried some RGBx changes, but nothing was rushing to hit me, except that the vertex shaders produced were different. However they were different for many reasons, due to the optimization pipelines the mesa state tracker runs vs the 965 driver. Inputs and UBO loads were in different places so there was a lot of noise in the shaders. I ported the trace to a piglit GL application so I could easier hack on the shaders and GL, with that I trimmed it down even further (even if I did burn some time on a misplace */+ typo). Using the ported app, I removed all uniform buffer loads and then split the vertex shader in half (it was quite large, but had two chunks). I finally then could spot the difference in the NIR shaders.

  • X.Org Server Adds "Fake Screen FPS" Option

    The X.Org Server has picked up a new "-fakescreenfps" option to help with VNC and other remote display scenarios. Currently when any main hardware screen is powered off, the X.Org Server initializes the fake screen to a one second update interval. The X.Org Server will keep to that one second update interval for fake screens even if VNC or other remote viewing software is running, until the physical display is powered on.

  • FluBot malware spreads to Australia

    The FluBot strain of Android banking malware, which was initially observed in Spain in late 2020 before spreading more widely across Europe over the following months, is now targeting Australian banks. Once installed, FluBot periodically sends a list of apps installed on the device to one of its command-and-control servers. The server responds with a list of apps the malware should overlay. Upon one of these apps being launched, FluBot immediately displays an overlay on top of the legitimate app. The overlays impersonate the legitimate apps and are designed to collect the victim’s online banking credentials, which are sent to the criminals operating FluBot via the command-and-control server.

  • Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July – Ariadne's Space

    Another month has passed, and we’ve gotten a lot of work done. No big announcements to make, but lots of incremental progress, bikeshedding and meetings. We have been laying the ground work for several initiatives in Alpine 3.15, as well as working with other groups to find a path forward on vulnerability information sharing.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Android Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. The past Android microconferences have been centered around the idea that it was primarily a synchronization point between the Android kernel team and the rest of the community to inform them on what they have been doing. With the help of last year’s focus on the Generic Kernel Image[1] (GKI), this year’s Android microconference will instead be an opportunity to foster a higher level of collaboration between the Android and Linux kernel communities. Discussions will be centered on the goal of ensuring that both the Android and Linux development moves in a lockstep fashion going forward.

  • Vaccines + Masks for Safe In-Person Events – Read About All On-Site Safety Protocols [Ed: Linux Foundation discriminates and is not inclusive. "A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status" means that Linux Foundation now mandates surveillance devices with back doors for all attendees. This is antithetical to a lot of Free software; they do not accept paper proof. There are commercial interests in the mix]

    The Linux Foundation is ecstatic to return to in-person events next month; we know how important these face-to-face gatherings are to accelerating collaboration and innovation in the open source community. [...] As announced previously, in-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status.

  • Petter Reinholdtsen: Mechanic's words in five languages, English, Norwegian and Northern Sámi editions

    Almost thirty years ago, some forward looking people interested in metal work and Northern Sámi, decided to create a list of words used in Northern Sámi metal work. After almost ten years this resulted in a dictionary database, published as the book "Mekanihkkársánit : Mekanikerord = Mekaanisen alan sanasto = Mechanic's words" in 1999. The story of this work is available from the pen of Svein Lund, one of the leading actors behind this effort. They even got the dictionary approved by the Sámi Parliament of Norway as the recommended metal work words to use. Fast forward twenty years, I came across this work when I recently became interested in metal work, and started watching educational and funny videos on the topic, like the ones from mrpete222 and This Old Tony. But they all talk English, but I wanted to know what the tools and techniques they used were called in Norwegian. Trying to track down a good dictionary from English to Norwegian, after much searching, I came across the database of words created almost thirty years ago, with translations into English, Norwegian, Northern Sámi, Swedish and Finnish. This gave me a lot of the Norwegian phrases I had been looking for. To make it easier for the next person trying to track down a good Norwegian dictionary for the metal worker, and because I knew the person behind the database from my Skolelinux / Debian Edu days, I decided to ask if the database could be released to the public without any usage limitations, in other words as a Creative Commons licensed data set. And happily, after consulting with the Sámi Parliament of Norway, the database is now available with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license from my gitlab repository.

  • Lang team August update

    This week the lang team held its August planning meeting. We normally hold these meetings on the first Wednesday of every month. We had a short meeting this month, just planning and scheduling the design meetings for the remainder of the month. After each meeting, we post an update (like this one!) with notes and meeting announcements.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: x13binary 1.1.57-1 on CRAN: New Upstream, New M1 Binary

    Christoph and I are please to share that a new release 1.1.57-1 of x13binary, of the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau (with updated upstream release 1.1.57) is now on CRAN. The x13binary package takes the pain out of installing X-13ARIMA-SEATS by making it a fully resolved CRAN dependency. For example, when installing the excellent seasonal package by Christoph, then X-13ARIMA-SEATS will get pulled in via the x13binary package and things just work. Just depend on x13binary and on all major OSs supported by R you should have an X-13ARIMA-SEATS binary installed which will be called seamlessly by the higher-level packages such as seasonal or gunsales. With this the full power of the what is likely the world’s most sophisticated deseasonalization and forecasting package is now at your fingertips and the R prompt, just like any other of the 17960+ CRAN packages. You can read more about this (and the seasonal package) in the Journal of Statistical Software paper by Christoph and myself. This release brings a new upstream release as well as binaries. We continue to support two Linux flavours (theh standard x86_64 as well as armv7l), windows and for a first time two macOS flavour. In addition to the existing Intel binary we now have a native built using the arm64 “M1” chip (with thanks to Kirill for the assist).

  • [LibreOffice] Tender to implement support for editing and creation of a Dynamic Diagram feature (#202108-02)

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free/libre open source (FLOSS) office suite LibreOffice. We are looking for an individual or company to implement support for editing and creation of Dynamic Diagrams. The work has to be developed on LibreOffice master, so that it will be released in the next major version. The task is to solve the following problem: Our existing “SmartArt” import uses the fallback stream in OOX files (and has some issues). It therefore gives us only the draw shapes that are imported, so we lose the original layout. Additionally, in older file versions we don’t have the cached shapes, and therefore can’t render anything. The solution we seek, and as such the scope of this tender, is to have a schema driven diagram layout as a core feature. This should be interoperable with OOX (at least MSO2016) and have suitable extensions for ODF. It should layout interoperability, and allow editing of the underlying data, and selection of a schema.

  • Cinelerra Enters Sparky Linux

    Cinelerra is one of the most advanced, open-source non-linear video editors and compositors for Linux. Turn your Linux box into a complete audio and video production environment.

  • The Brains Behind the Books – Part VIII: Julia Faltenbacher

    My name is Julia, I was born in Bremen. This beautiful old Hanseatic city is situated in the north of Germany, close to the North Sea. When I was six years old, my parents and I moved to Rosenheim in Bavaria, which is on the southern end of Germany. Rosenheim is a rather small city, close to the Alps. I consider this my first “experience abroad”, as Bavarian people are very different to the Northern German people. They have a very strong accent and a special dialect. It took me years to understand the Bavarian dialect, and I still can’t talk like them. And still, I am learning new Bavarian words I have never heard before.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Linux and Arduino Hardware

  • An open source desk to showcase your projects, complete with swappable panels | Arduino Blog

    Almost every maker has run into the problem of not being able to find a convenient display or power source for their project prototype, and thus leading to minor delays and some frustration. However, YouTuber Another Maker has come up with an open source desk concept that makes finding these things simple. The system he built uses a large grid of swappable panels that can simply slide into place within a wooden frame. Behind these are a few devices for both power and connectivity, such as power strips, an Ethernet switch (with PoE capabilities), and an HDMI switch for changing between a Raspberry Pi and a PC.

  • Tiger Lake-H modules include Nano-ITX-sized COM-HPC Client B model

    Congatec announced “Conga-HPC/cTLH” (COM-HPC Client B) and “Conga-TS570” (Basic Type 6) modules with up to octa-core Tiger Lake-H CPUs. The Conga-HPC/cTLH offers up to 128GB DDR4, optional NVMe, 20x PCIe Gen4, 2x 2.5GbE, 2x USB 4.0, and 8K support.

  • Intel Core i5-1135G7 Tiger Lake mini PC with 12GB RAM sells for $700 and up

    Minisforum TL50 is a mini PC based on Intel Core i5-1135G7 Tiger Lake quad-core/octa-thread processor that ships with 12GB RAM, and optional 256GB and 512GB SSD preloaded with Windows 10 Pro. The mini PC also features two 2.5 Gbps Gigabit Ethernet ports, two 2.5-inch SATA drives, one M.2 slot for NVMe SSD, and supports 8K and 4K monitor setups through HDMI, DisplayPort, and USB-C video outputs. It was announced a few months ago, but it’s now available for sale for $699.99 and more on Banggood depending on storage options.