Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibO

LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 is available for testing

Filed under
LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 is available for testing!

LibreOffice 7.0 will be released as final at the beginning of August, 2020 ( Check the Release Plan for more information ) being LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 the forth pre-release since the development of version 7.0 started in the beginning of June, 2019. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.0 Beta2, 174 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 116 bugs have been fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in LibreOffice 7.0.

LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 can be downloaded from here for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

Read more

Results from the survey about LibreOffice’s web presence

Filed under
LibO

In total 794 people visited the survey of them 569 completed it. We asked first how often the site is accessed, what people are looking for, and if they succeed.

[...]

We also asked in what situation people use the application (almost even for personal, business and dual use), about their expertise with LibreOffice (25% basic, 65% intermediate, 10% expert level), and tech-savviness in general. The idea was to possibly split answers in beginners and experts. But unfortunately most participants are very interested in IT and proficient in LibreOffice.

People who answered the question whether they contributed to the project with yes (97) were asked a few more questions.

Almost evenly distributed is the frequency of contribution from once per week over month and year to non-recurring. Most contributors do user support, followed by QA and documentation.

Read more

Also: [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 5 Report

Will LibreOffice 7.0 be only Personal Edition for individual use???

Filed under
LibO

Look at LibreOffice logo with "Personal Edition" phrase, look at sidebar in Start Center with the same phrase and note to "The Personal edition is supported by volunteers and intended for individual use."
And what is mean? Where is any public announcement? They say it was in marketing mail list. How many people read that mail list? Five?
It means that I can't install LibreOffice 7.0 in any organization in Russia, because our controlling people will be see very simple to legality in this case: open the About dialog -> read that "intended for individual use" and LibreOffice logo with "Personal Edition" -> you can't use LibreOffice here! Nobody will check what say MPL 2.0 license about it or why TDF made it, they just point a finger at it and they will be right!
It will close for LibreOffice any education organizations like schools or colleges or universities.
I wont popularize LibreOffice for young people because they will never see LibreOffice in them schools.
I against these changes. Please revoke it!

Read more

LibreOffice 6.4.5 Released with over 100 Bug Fixes, Now Ready for Enterprise Deployments

Filed under
LibO
Security

LibreOffice 6.4.5 comes one and a half months after LibreOffice 6.4.4 and it’s packed with lots of bug fixes across all core components. A total of 106 bugs have been addressed in this new point release, as documented here and here.

But, the good news that I would like to share with you today is that the LibreOffice 6.4 office suite series is now finally ready for enterprise deployments in production environments as it’s thoroughly tested and includes several months of bug fixes.

Those of you using the LibreOffice 6.3 office suite series in enterprise environments should upgrade to LibreOffice 6.4.5 as soon as possible. You can download the latest release for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms right now from the official website.

Read more

LibreOffice: 7.0 Testing, Simulated Animation Effects (GSoC), Pareto Charts

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 Bug Hunting Session

    LibreOffice 7.0 is being developed by our worldwide community, and is due to be released in early August 2020 – see the release notes describing the new features here.

    In order to find, report and triage bugs, the LibreOffice QA team is organizing the second Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 7.0 on Monday July 6, 2020. Tests will be performed on the first Release Candidate version, which will be available on the pre-releases server the day of the event. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), macOS and Windows.

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#4

    After getting simulated animation effects somewhat a presentable state in week 3 on my experimental branch, this week my goal was to make them saveable.

    Since I wanted them to be saveable on SMIL hierarchies, like the rest of the animations, I’ve started by creating new xml tokens that’ll be used and named them “motion-simulated” and “animateSimulation”.

    Made required connections for importing/exporting these animation effects mimicking how path motion is imported/exported.

    Later created a new animation preset on Effects.xcu for testing purposes and called it arbitarily “Simulated Basic”.
    And lastly, connected stuff with animation effects panel creating a new category there for simulated animations.

  • How to Create a Pareto Diagram [80/20 Rule] in LibreOffice Calc

    In this LibreOffice tip, you’ll learn to create the famous Pareto chart in Calc.

Tumbleweed Gets LibreOffice "7", New Breezy Features

Filed under
LibO
SUSE

LibreOffice 7 beta 2 was updated in snapshot 20200622. The new major version improves the usage of quotation marks and an apostrophe in several languages with autocorrect. LibreOffice 7 adds support for exporting to new versions of Open Document Format, available via Tools > Options > Load/Save > General > ODF format version: “ODF 1.3” and “ODF 1.3 Extended”; the latter is the default, unless the user has previously changed the version in the configuration. Another new (experimental) feature is to make documents more accessible: an accessibility check tool to review common accessibility problems in documents, and support for PDF/UA specifications in the PDF export dialog. To enable the accessibility check tool and the PDF/UA export, go to: Tools > Options… > LibreOffice > Advanced > Optional Features > Enable experimental features (may be unstable). Then restart LibreOffice. A handful of libraries were updated in the snapshot including libzip 1.7.1, which restore LIBZIP_VERSION_{MAJOR,MINOR,MICRO} symbols, and gnome-desktop 3.36.3.1 had some clock and translation updates. The general-purpose scripting language php7 updated to version 7.4.7 fixed a regression in the previous version when yielding an array based generator and fixed a bug that involved hangs when an invalid value was encountered. The microcode updates for Intel x86/x86-64 CPUs, ucode-intel, reverted some code for the processor microarchitecture Skylake in the snapshot that caused some stability issues. The snapshot is trending moderately stable with a rating of 78, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Read more

Also: User defined color for symbols in LibreOffice Math formulas

LibreOffice Looks Gorgeous on Zorin OS

Filed under
OS
LibO

Do you know that LibreOffice looks pretty on Zorin? The developers apparently made excellent effort so that its appearance looks well shaped as from its desktop, its start menu, to file manager, every app looks pretty, and this includes the office suite. I present you here short videos and simple reviews of these beautiful combination for our computing. Enjoy!

Read more

LibreOffice Community and GSoC Students

Filed under
LibO
  • Community Member Monday: Jwtiyar Ali

    Hey! I live in the Kurdistan region, in the north of Iraq – the city of Sulaymaniyah. I have an MSc in Physics, but I love computer science too. Currently I am working in the Cement Quality Control Department at a cement factory, as a physicist.

    I do translations for many open source projects such as Ubuntu, Gimp, Firefox etc., leading these translation projects. My hobbies are following new open source projects and seeing how they can be more competitive. I also like football, walking, and reading Python programming courses in my free time.

    [...]

    I am translating LibreOffice. I hope to see LibreOffice in my language – that would be perfect. Also, it would help users to interact with LibreOffice more often than before.

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#3

    This week, my main goal was instead of using PathAnimation classes, make the required connections in the animation engine so that simulated animations are part of the animation engine, and make it possible to have more than one simulated shape in a slide. I did this by mostly cloning PathAnimation classes and doing some changes to the SlideImpl.

  • Week 3 Report

    The last week was the Third week of coding weeks in GSoC program. I continued adding support for the non supported items.

LibreOffice 7.0 Beta 2 is available for testing

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice 7.0 Beta 2 is available for downloading and testing.

Read more

The Draw Guide 6.4 is Ready for Download

Filed under
LibO

Following the recent release of our updated guides, the LibreOffice Documentation Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of the LibreOffice Draw Guide 6.4, the complete handbook for the drawing tool of LibreOffice. The guide was updated from the existing release 4.3 and include all the improvements developed since early 2014, when the last version of the guide was published.

LibreOffice Draw is the vector drawing tool of LibreOffice, capable of creating and edit complex drawings, from basic geometric shapes to sophisticated technical drawings, including tri-dimensional composition, all supporting the ODF file format standard.

“Returning to the LibreOffice Documentation team was a great opportunity for me to continue to contribute for the LibreOffice Community. I used all my 35 years of professional experience as a technical writer in high end industries to bring the Draw Guide up to date with the latest publicly available release of LibreOffice (Version 6.4). I hope the community enjoy LibreOffice as this is an excellent office software package that is freely available” said Peter Schofield, who coordinated the update and release of the Draw guide.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Stable Clonezilla live 2.6.7-28 Released

This release of Clonezilla live (2.6.7-28) includes major enhancements and bug fixes.
ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES from 2.6.6-15

  • The underlying GNU/Linux operating system was upgraded. This release is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2020/Jun/30).
  • Linux kernel was updated to 5.7.6-1.
  • ocs-iso, ocs-live-dev: sync syslinux-related files when copying syslinux exec files.
  • When creating recovery iso/zip file, if it's in Clonezilla live environment, we have those syslinux files. Use that first so the version mismatch can be avoided. Ref: https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/support-requests/127/
  • Move grub-header.cfg from bootx64.efi to grub.cfg so that it's more flexible.
  • To avoid conflict with the patch of grub in CentOS/Fedora, for GRUB EFI NB MAC/IP config style, the netboot file is now like grub.cfg-drbl-00:50:56:01:01:01 and grub.cfg-drbl-192.168.177.2 not grub.cfg-01-* anymore.
  • Add xen-tools
  • Partclone was updated to 0.3.14. The codes about xfs was updated to be 4.20.0.
  • Package exfat-fuse was removed since the kernel has module for that.
  • A better mechanism to deal with linuxefi/initrdefi or linux/initrd in the grub config was added.
  • Read more

Pico-ITX board based on i.MX8M ships with Linux BSP

F&S has launched a $407 and up “armStone MX8M” Pico-ITX SBC that runs Linux on an i.MX8M with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC with GbE, WiFi/BT, 5x USB, MIPI-CSI, DVI, and a mini-PCIe slot. F&S Elektronik Systeme originally announced the NXP i.MX8M-based armStone MX8M Pico-ITX board in early 2018 with an intention to begin sampling in Q2 of that year. The i.MX8M-based SBC has finally arrived, selling for 360 Euros ($407) in a kit that includes cables, a Yocto/Buildroot BSP, and full access to documentation. The key new addition since the 2018 announcement is a mini-PCIe slot and SIM card slot. Instead of supplying 4x USB 2.0 host ports, you get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0, and the micro-USB OTG port has been updated from 2.0 to 3.0. Read more

Programming: Rust, Perl, Compilers, IBM/Red Hat and More

  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.16.0 release

    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.16.0, was released. As usual this release follows the latest gtk-rs release. This is the first version that includes optional support for new GStreamer 1.18 APIs. As GStreamer 1.18 was not released yet, these new APIs might still change. The minimum supported version of the bindings is still GStreamer 1.8 and the targetted GStreamer API version can be selected by applications via feature flags. Apart from this, new version features mostly features API cleanup and the addition of a few missing APIs. The focus of this release was to make usage of GStreamer from Rust as convenient and complete as possible.

  • Set up Vim as your Rust IDE

    Text editors and integrated development environment (IDE) tools make writing Rust code easier and quicker. There are many editors to choose from, but I believe the Vim editor is a great fit for a Rust IDE. In this article, I'll explain how to set up Vim for Rust application development.

  • It was bound to happen.

    While I don't actually work in Perl these days, and not by choice, I still keep an eye on the community. The language is chugging along nicely. Perl 6 is out, so at least that joke has died down, features are being added, some beneficiary, some not. All is well in perland. Then the news dropped. Perl 7. I was very interested. More so when I realised that it was a rebranding of the latest Perl. First, let me say one thing right off the bat. It's a good call. I'm all for it. In fact, I'm so all for it that I called for it in a post from 2011. At the time I suggested using codenames like Apple and others do, or to rebrand Perl 5.14 (at the time) as Perl 14 like Java did. Here's why I thought, and still do, that this "rebranding" is a Good Thing: It bypass the whole perl5/per6 story. With perl 6 not being perl anymore and Perl 5.32 being rebranded Perl 7 the community will be able to finally move past this whole deal.

  • When a deleted master device file only takes 20 mins out of your maintenance window, but a whole year off your lifespan

    Out of ideas, Jim decided to crash (rather than halt) the system by typing the BREAK sequence at the console. The server would not get the chance to close the file cleanly... "We said a small prayer, crossed our fingers, booted the server, and waited for the file system check (fsck) to repair the damage we had done," he recalled. "I've never typed the letter 'y' more carefully than when asked if we wanted to re-link orphaned inodes." With an elevated heart rate, Jim logged in and checked the file system's lost+found directory.

  • LLVMpipe Now Exposes OpenGL 4.2 For GL On CPUs

    It was just a few days ago that the LLVMpipe OpenGL software rasterizer within Mesa finally achieved OpenGL 4.0 support while today it has crossed both OpenGL 4.1 and 4.2 milestones. Thanks to much of GL 4.1 and GL 4.2 support for this Gallium3D software driver already being in place, it didn't take too much work to get it over the latest hurdles.

  • GCC Compiler Support Posted For Intel AMX

    Building upon Intel working on GNU toolchain support for AMX, the newly-detailed Advanced Matrix Extensions being introduced next year with "Sapphire Rapids" Xeon CPUs, the GCC compiler support has been sent out in patch form. On top of the GNU bits that began at the end of June following Intel publishing documentation on AMX, AMX started landing in LLVM too a few days ago. The latest is AMX enablement for the GNU Compiler Collection sent out overnight.

  • 9 open source test-automation frameworks

    A test-automation framework is a set of best practices, common tools, and libraries that help quality-assurance testers assess the functionality, security, usability, and accessibility of multiple web and mobile applications. In a "quick-click" digital world, we're accustomed to fulfilling our needs in a jiffy. This is one reason why the software market is flooded with hundreds of test-automation frameworks. Although teams could build elaborate automated testing frameworks, there's usually little reason to spend the money, resources, and person-hours to do so when they can achieve equal or even better results with existing open source tools, libraries, and testing frameworks.

  • Profile-guided optimization in Clang: Dealing with modified sources

    Profile-guided optimization (PGO) is a now-common compiler technique for improving the compilation process. In PGO (sometimes pronounced “pogo”), an administrator uses the first version of the binary to collect a profile, through instrumentation or sampling, then uses that information to guide the compilation process. Profile-guided optimization can help developers make better decisions, for instance, concerning inlining or block ordering. In some cases, it can also lead to using obsolete profile information to guide compilation. For reasons that I will explain, this feature can benefit large projects. It also puts the burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies. This article focuses on how the Clang compiler implements PGO, and specifically, how it instruments binaries. We will look at what happens when Clang instruments source code during the compilation step to collect profile information during execution. Then, I’ll introduce a real-world bug that demonstrates the pitfalls of the current approach to PGO. [...] Clang and GCC both support using obsolete profile information to guide the compilation process. If a function body changes, obsolete information is ignored. This feature can be beneficial for large projects, where gathering profile information is costly. This puts an extra burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies, which also increases the likelihood of a compiler bug.

  • Earn a Red Hat containers certification online

    Lockdowns and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 have meant limited access to testing centers for most certification programs in much of the world. We recently announced that remote exams would be an option in the near future for taking some Red Hat certification exams. In the meantime, many organizations are using the current situation as an opportunity for their teams to learn and build new skills in support of containers and Kubernetes. The need to provide the hands-on validation of these skills provided by Red Hat Certification has never been greater. In order to address these limitations and needs, and to help organizations and IT professionals pursue the opportunities offered by these technologies, Red Hat is offering a new certification, Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containers for Kubernetes to people who pass the Preliminary Exam in Containers, Kubernetes, and Openshift (PE180). This certification will be given to those who have already taken the exam since it was launched in late 2019 as well as those who pass it going forward. This affordable certification offers IT professionals a remote option to strengthen their Kubernetes skills and embrace a DevOps mindset.

  • Official Gentoo Docker images

    Did you already know that we have official Gentoo Docker images available on Docker Hub?! The most popular one is based on the amd64 stage. Images are created automatically; you can peek at the source code for this on our git server. Thanks to the Gentoo Docker project!

  • Grupo Condis Embraces the Hybrid Cloud with Red Hat OpenShift

    Red Hat, Inc, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Grupo Condis has adopted Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform, as part of its digital transformation strategy. Building on the back of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift helps Condis respond to market needs faster, build greater customer loyalty and create more innovative services without sacrificing the stability of critical operations.

Meet the GNOMEies: Kristi Progri

What is your role within the GNOME community? I am the Program Coordinator in the GNOME Foundation where I help to organize various events, leading many initiatives within the community including the Engagement Team, and working closely with all the volunteers and contributors. I also coordinate internships and help with general Foundation activities. Do you have any other affiliations you want to share? Before joining GNOME, I was very active in Mozilla community. I have been part of the Tech Speakers program and a Mozilla Representative for more than seven years now. I have organized many events and workshops and also have participated as a speaker talking about Free Software communities at many events around the globe. Why did you get involved in GNOME? I was introduced to Free Software when I was in high school, my friend had a computer running Debian and he started explaining how it worked. This was the first time I heard about it and I immediately understood that I would never be part of these communities. It looked so complicated and not my cup of tea, but it looks like I was very wrong. Once I went for to a hackerspace meeting I completely changed my mind and from that moment the hackerspace become my second home. Read more