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LibreOffice on The Document Foundation (TDF) and ODF TC

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  • Community Member Monday: Manuel Frassinetti

    Today we’re chatting with Manuel Frassinetti from our Italian LibreOffice community, who recently became a Member of The Document Foundation, the non-profit behind LibreOffice…

    Tell us a bit about yourself!

    I’m from Modena, Italy and I’m still living in this city. I’m just a normal free software user – a GNU/Linux user since 2001. I moved from Debian to Ubuntu, and then returned to Debian. The first love is never forgotten! Smile

    I use free and open source software and both in private and in my work. I have a Dell series 3500 laptop, an old IBM T42 ThinkPad in private and a HP Compaq 6000 pro at work, all with Debian 10. I am very much a beginner programmer (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) and also a beginner hardware technician. For both software and hardware specializations, I have not been in the world of work since 2003, since I became a tobacconist.

  • Update from the ODF Technical Committee

    The ODF TC has recently updated the project charter after more than a decade. The updated document is available at: https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/office/charter.php. The most important news is the commitment to deliver a Committee Specification Draft at least every year in December, consisting of RelaxNG schemas and written specifications, to avoid a long delay between two consecutive versions of the standard as in the recent past.

    The ODF TC also aims to provide a fast-track for new ODF features of implementers, and publish the lowest standard (OASIS Committee Specification) more frequently, so features can be quickly reviewed and embraced into an ODF CS Standard without the need to use the intermediate LibreOffice External namespaces (lo-ext), with all the associated delays and costs.

How to Make LibreOffice Look Like Microsoft Office

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We made an attempt to make the LibreOffice suite look like Microsoft Office. Is it possible? Let's find out.
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LibreOffice 7.2 Beta1 is available for testing

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The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.2 Beta1 is available for testing!

LibreOffice 7.2 will be released as final in mid August, 2021 ( Check the Release Plan for more information ) being LibreOffice 7.2 Beta1 the second pre-release since the development of version 7.2 started at the end of November, 2020. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.2 Alpha1, 1163 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 221 issues got fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.2 Beta1 can be downloaded from here for Linux, MacOS and Windows, and it can be installed alongside the standard version.

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WordPerfect and LibreOffice/Document Foundation

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  • Did you know that you can 100% legally get & run WordPerfect for free?

    In fact, there are two free versions: one for Classic MacOS, made freeware when WordPerfect discontinued Mac support, and a native Linux version, for which Corel offered a free, fully-working, demo version.

    But there is a catch – of course: they're both very old and hard to run on a modern computer. I'm here to tell you how to get them and how to install and run them.

  • LibreOffice 7.1.2.2 compiled in OE

    The last time that I compiled LibreOffice (LO) in OpenEmbedded (OE) was in the Pyro-series. My port of OE back then is still on github, search for "oe-qky-src'.

  • Hossein Nourikhah joins the TDF team as Developer Community Architect

    Next week, Hossein Nourikhah will join the team at The Document Foundation, the non-profit behind LibreOffice, as Developer Community Architect. Hossein is a developer, university lecturer and FOSS advocate. He writes programs, teaches programming to students, and is an advocate for the use of free software applications, because they have a huge positive impact on the quality of our life by providing the essential freedoms that we all deserve.

    Hossein has a B.Sc. in Computer Engineering (Software) from Isfahan University of Technology, and a M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Information Technology from Amirkabir University of Technology, also called the Tehran Polytechnic. Since 2016 he has been an instructor at the Amirkabir University of Technology, teaching various courses including C/C++ programming, operating systems, software design, and many others.

    Hossein started programming in BASIC and Pascal when he was 12, and after two and a half decades he is still involved in programming for fun and profit. He has worked with several programming languages, including C/C++, Java, Pascal, PHP and many more.

LibreOffice with Colibre Icons Overview

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This article exposes LibreOffice with its built-in, Colibre Icons, which are made especially for Windows users with a lot of screenshot pictures. I made this collection of screenshots with LibreOffice 7.0 AppImage Version (click here to download) which is runnable in different OSes I use. Let's enjoy this!

Colibre is related to Karasa Jaga and Sukapura icon themes which are created by the same co-author Rizal Muttaqin -- he is one of respected designers at LibreOffice --. Andreaz Kainz is the designer and maintainer of three icon themes namely Elementary, Colibre and Breeze aside from many other LibreOffice artworks and the author of Colibre website above.

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LibreOffice: 100 Paper Cuts and Multiple Columns in LibreOffice Text Boxes

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  • 100 Paper Cuts as a new student mentoring activity

    Just before the pandemic, the Board of Directors of The Document Foundation approved a budget to launch an educational program targeted to universities, where students at selected tech schools would receive an economic incentive to promote LibreOffice amongst their peers, with the objective of increasing the number of young contributors both in source code development and in other areas. Unfortunately, the pandemics has forced all universities to stop all collateral activities, and this has resulted in the program being frozen for over one year.

  • Multiple columns in LibreOffice text boxes

    Thanks to SUSE, our valuable partner who supported this development, we at Collabora Productivity have implemented support for multi-column layout in LibreOffice’s text boxes.

    Up to now, it was only possible to use columns in Writer’s page styles, sections and frames. One could not make text boxes, including those used in Impress, with text distributed to several columns. Well, there are workarounds like using tables, but indeed that was not the same, and was breaking the text flow.

LibreOffice, Typesetting, and Curl-based HTTP/WebDAV UCP

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LibreOffice 7.1.4 Community available for download

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LibreOffice 7.1.4 Community, the fourth minor release of the LibreOffice 7.1 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users, is available for download from https://www.libreoffice.org/download/. LibreOffice 7.1.4 includes around 80 bug fixes, with 20% focused on Microsoft Office file compatibility (DOCX, XLSX and PPTX, and legacy DOCs).

For enterprise-class deployments, TDF strongly recommends the LibreOffice Enterprise family of applications from ecosystem partners, with long-term support options, professional assistance, custom features and Service Level Agreements: https://www.libreoffice.org/download/libreoffice-in-business/.

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LibreOffice: Books, GUI, and Conference

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  • Jussi Pakkanen: Formatting an entire book with LibreOffice, what's it like?

    I have created full books using both LaTeX and Scribus. I have never done it with LibreOffice, though. The closest I've ever come was watching people write their masters' theses in Word, failing miserably and swearing profusely. To find out what it's really like, I chose to typeset an entire book from scratch using nothing else but LibreOffice.

    The unfortunate thing about LibreOffice (which it inherits from MS Word compatibility) is that there is a "correct" way to use it which is the exact opposite way of how people instinctively want to use it. The proper way is to use styles for everything as opposed to applying fonts, sizes, spacing et al by hand. In practice every time I am given a Word document I check how it has been formatted. I have never seen a single document in the wild that would have gotten this right. Even something as simple as chapter indentation is almost always done with spaces.

  • Caolán McNamara: LibreOffice GTK4 Port: More MenuButtons

    More MenuButton features working under GTK4. Now with working radio entries in GtkPopoverMenu dropdowns.

  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Papers

    LibreOffice Conference Call for Papers is open until June 30, 2021. Thanks to the efforts of TDF infra team led by Guilhem Moulin, you can now submit your proposal using TDF brand new event management platform at https://events.documentfoundation.org/libocon2021/cfp. We know that you were all eager to use that platform for your proposals, and now you don’t have any excuse for a further delay of your submission!

Formatting an entire book with LibreOffice, what's it like?

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LibO

I have created full books using both LaTeX and Scribus. I have never done it with LibreOffice, though. The closest I've ever come was watching people write their masters' theses in Word, failing miserably and swearing profusely. To find out what it's really like, I chose to typeset an entire book from scratch using nothing else but LibreOffice.

The unfortunate thing about LibreOffice (which it inherits from MS Word compatibility) is that there is a "correct" way to use it which is the exact opposite way of how people instinctively want to use it. The proper way is to use styles for everything as opposed to applying fonts, sizes, spacing et al by hand. In practice every time I am given a Word document I check how it has been formatted. I have never seen a single document in the wild that would have gotten this right. Even something as simple as chapter indentation is almost always done with spaces.

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