Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gadgets

Time for PineTime

Filed under
Reviews
Gadgets

I just received my PineTime and set it up with GadgetBridge on my Android device. So far it has been a pleasant experience.

[...]

My device was shipped with version 1.2 of the InfiniTime firmware, so I’m one release behind. I ordered the sealed device (because the price is amazing), but I already am itching to get coding.

Read more

Sxmo 1.5.0 released with networking, screen lock, and UI improvements

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

The latest version of Sxmo adds a few new features including support for configuring a WiFi hotspot from your phone’s Network Menu and support for a proximity lock that automatically locks or unlocks the display based on proximity (so the screen doesn’t come on when your phone is in your pocket, for example).

Sxmo 1.5.0 also brings a number of performance and user interface tweaks and some under-the-hood changes. But overall, Sxmo continues to be a simple, speedy user interface for mobile Linux devices. In fact, it’s so well optimized that it can make even a low-end smartphone like the PinePhone feel fast.

Read more

WayDroid lets you run Android apps on Linux phones (with smoother performance than Anbox)

Filed under
Gadgets

Smartphones are basically pocket-sized computers running mobile-friendly operating systems. And folks who want to run a free and open source GNU/Linux distribution on their phones get the advantages of a hackable, customizable OS that can run desktop Linux applications as well as mobile apps.

But the selection of mobile-optimized Linux apps is still rather small, which is why some folks have been using tools like Anbox to run Android applications on Linux phones. But now there’s a new work-in-progress alternative to Anbox called WayDroid which offers smoother performance on supported devices.

Read more

A clunky (but useable) method for recording video on a PinePhone

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

Most smartphones ship with software capable of taking advantage of all the device’s hardware. But the PinePhone isn’t most smartphones. It’s designed to be an open platform for developers and when it first began shipping there was only some very basic software available.

Among other things, there was no working camera app. Now there is. And up until recently there had also been no good method for recording video on a PinePhone. But now redditor UJC_theguy has come up with a method for recording 720p video at 30 frames per second.

Read more

Pine64's $30 Linux Smartwatch Launches

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Back in 2019, Pine64 announced that it was working on a $25 Linux smartwatch. It turns out $25 was a little optimistic because, as OMG! Ubuntu! reports, the PineTime has now launched carrying a $29.99 price tag. I think we can all forgive Pine64 for charging an extra $5, and the current Community launch price is only $26.99.

Keeping in mind how little this smartwatch costs, you're getting a device that weights 38 grams and is made from a mix of zinc alloy and plastic. The display is a 1.3-inch IPS touch screen panel with a 240-by-240 pixel resolution and 65,000 colors. The internal memory consists of 64KB of RAM, 512KB of Flash system storage, and 4MB of additional flash storage. The watch is powered by a 64MHz ARM Cortex-M4F as part of the Nordic Semiconductor nRF52832 SoC.

Read more

Signal desktop app ported to phones running Mobian Linux

Filed under
Gadgets

Signal is a popular open source, cross-platform messaging app with an emphasis on privacy and security thanks to end-to-end encryption for all text messages and voice or video calls.

There are versions of Signal available for Android, iOS, Windows, macOS, and Linux. But until recently folks who wanted to use Signal on a Linux phone like the PinePhone had to either load the official Android app using a tool like Anbox, or use a third-party Signal client like Axolotl.

Now developer 0mniteck has found a way to bring the official Signal desktop client to smartphones with ARM64 processors running the Mobian Linux distribution.

Read more

PineTime is an Inexpensive Open Source Smartwatch

Filed under
Gadgets

The PineTime is a free and open source smartwatch capable of running custom-built open operating systems. It’s available from the Pine64 Store for $27.

Pine64’s PineTime is an interesting smartwatch with equally interesting software surrounded it. It would be a good companion for not only your PinePhone but also for your favorite devices – any phone, tablet, or even PC.

Above all, PineTime is a very inexpensive smartwatch especially compared to the competition. If you were on a budget but still want something cool, this can do the job.

Read more

Kobo Clara HD becomes an E Ink Linux tablet with the help of postmarketOS

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

The Kobo Clara HD is an eReader with a 6 inch E Ink display and Kobo’s software designed for reading eBooks. But thanks to a new work-in-progress port of postmarketOS for the device, you can now use the Kobo Clara HD as a Linux tablet with an E Ink display.

That could make this device, which sells for $120, a much more versatile gadget. That said, there are always going to be some limitations when running desktop or mobile applications on devices with E Ink displays, and installing the Linux-based postmarketOS does require opening the case and replacing the pre-installed software, so there is a chance that you may mess up your device. So proceed with caution.

Read more

Mycroft, an open source voice assistant works with Linux smartphones like the PinePhone

Filed under
Gadgets

Apple’s smartphones have Siri. Most Android phones have Google Assistant. And Samsung phones have Bixby. Voice assistant software has become an increasingly common feature for modern smartphones.

But what about Linux phones? While none of the GNU/Linux distributions available for smartphones like the PinePhone or Librem 5 have a voice assistant baked in, these are basically pocket-sized Linux computers. So of course you can install one – and redditor /u/SkippyTheMgnfcnt shows what happens when you get the open source Mycroft up and running on a PinePhone.

Read more

Hardware accelerated video playback now possible on the PinePhone

Filed under
Gadgets

You’ve been able to watch videos on a PinePhone for a while, but up until recently most of the video players available for the phone have relied on software to render videos. That means they hammer the phone’s limited CPU resources, causing video to occasionally look choppy and often limiting playback to low resolutions.

Recently Brian Daniels discovered a method for enabling hardware-accelerated video playback using command line tools. Now support is baked into a media player called Clapper. There’s no more need fire up a terminal to start your video playback.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Get More of Everything With the "Get New" Button in KDE Plasma

KDE Plasma is a desktop tweaker’s dream come true. You can virtually change every aspect of the desktop, from adding widgets and changing fonts, to trying out over-the-top effects and transformative themes. With most interfaces, you need to know where to look online to find these sorts of tweaks, but KDE spares you the effort. There’s a handy little magic button that delivers the goods right to your desktop. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Dave Airlie: crocus misrendering of the week

    The bottom image is crocus vs 965 on top. This only happened on Gen4->5, so Ironlake and GM45 were my test machines. I burned a lot of time trying to work this out. I trimmed the traces down, dumped a stupendous amount of batchbuffers, turned off UBO push constants, dump all the index and vertex buffers, tried some RGBx changes, but nothing was rushing to hit me, except that the vertex shaders produced were different. However they were different for many reasons, due to the optimization pipelines the mesa state tracker runs vs the 965 driver. Inputs and UBO loads were in different places so there was a lot of noise in the shaders. I ported the trace to a piglit GL application so I could easier hack on the shaders and GL, with that I trimmed it down even further (even if I did burn some time on a misplace */+ typo). Using the ported app, I removed all uniform buffer loads and then split the vertex shader in half (it was quite large, but had two chunks). I finally then could spot the difference in the NIR shaders.

  • X.Org Server Adds "Fake Screen FPS" Option

    The X.Org Server has picked up a new "-fakescreenfps" option to help with VNC and other remote display scenarios. Currently when any main hardware screen is powered off, the X.Org Server initializes the fake screen to a one second update interval. The X.Org Server will keep to that one second update interval for fake screens even if VNC or other remote viewing software is running, until the physical display is powered on.

  • FluBot malware spreads to Australia

    The FluBot strain of Android banking malware, which was initially observed in Spain in late 2020 before spreading more widely across Europe over the following months, is now targeting Australian banks. Once installed, FluBot periodically sends a list of apps installed on the device to one of its command-and-control servers. The server responds with a list of apps the malware should overlay. Upon one of these apps being launched, FluBot immediately displays an overlay on top of the legitimate app. The overlays impersonate the legitimate apps and are designed to collect the victim’s online banking credentials, which are sent to the criminals operating FluBot via the command-and-control server.

  • Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July – Ariadne's Space

    Another month has passed, and we’ve gotten a lot of work done. No big announcements to make, but lots of incremental progress, bikeshedding and meetings. We have been laying the ground work for several initiatives in Alpine 3.15, as well as working with other groups to find a path forward on vulnerability information sharing.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Android Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. The past Android microconferences have been centered around the idea that it was primarily a synchronization point between the Android kernel team and the rest of the community to inform them on what they have been doing. With the help of last year’s focus on the Generic Kernel Image[1] (GKI), this year’s Android microconference will instead be an opportunity to foster a higher level of collaboration between the Android and Linux kernel communities. Discussions will be centered on the goal of ensuring that both the Android and Linux development moves in a lockstep fashion going forward.

  • Vaccines + Masks for Safe In-Person Events – Read About All On-Site Safety Protocols [Ed: Linux Foundation discriminates and is not inclusive. "A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status" means that Linux Foundation now mandates surveillance devices with back doors for all attendees. This is antithetical to a lot of Free software; they do not accept paper proof. There are commercial interests in the mix]

    The Linux Foundation is ecstatic to return to in-person events next month; we know how important these face-to-face gatherings are to accelerating collaboration and innovation in the open source community. [...] As announced previously, in-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status.

  • Petter Reinholdtsen: Mechanic's words in five languages, English, Norwegian and Northern Sámi editions

    Almost thirty years ago, some forward looking people interested in metal work and Northern Sámi, decided to create a list of words used in Northern Sámi metal work. After almost ten years this resulted in a dictionary database, published as the book "Mekanihkkársánit : Mekanikerord = Mekaanisen alan sanasto = Mechanic's words" in 1999. The story of this work is available from the pen of Svein Lund, one of the leading actors behind this effort. They even got the dictionary approved by the Sámi Parliament of Norway as the recommended metal work words to use. Fast forward twenty years, I came across this work when I recently became interested in metal work, and started watching educational and funny videos on the topic, like the ones from mrpete222 and This Old Tony. But they all talk English, but I wanted to know what the tools and techniques they used were called in Norwegian. Trying to track down a good dictionary from English to Norwegian, after much searching, I came across the database of words created almost thirty years ago, with translations into English, Norwegian, Northern Sámi, Swedish and Finnish. This gave me a lot of the Norwegian phrases I had been looking for. To make it easier for the next person trying to track down a good Norwegian dictionary for the metal worker, and because I knew the person behind the database from my Skolelinux / Debian Edu days, I decided to ask if the database could be released to the public without any usage limitations, in other words as a Creative Commons licensed data set. And happily, after consulting with the Sámi Parliament of Norway, the database is now available with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license from my gitlab repository.

  • Lang team August update

    This week the lang team held its August planning meeting. We normally hold these meetings on the first Wednesday of every month. We had a short meeting this month, just planning and scheduling the design meetings for the remainder of the month. After each meeting, we post an update (like this one!) with notes and meeting announcements.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: x13binary 1.1.57-1 on CRAN: New Upstream, New M1 Binary

    Christoph and I are please to share that a new release 1.1.57-1 of x13binary, of the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau (with updated upstream release 1.1.57) is now on CRAN. The x13binary package takes the pain out of installing X-13ARIMA-SEATS by making it a fully resolved CRAN dependency. For example, when installing the excellent seasonal package by Christoph, then X-13ARIMA-SEATS will get pulled in via the x13binary package and things just work. Just depend on x13binary and on all major OSs supported by R you should have an X-13ARIMA-SEATS binary installed which will be called seamlessly by the higher-level packages such as seasonal or gunsales. With this the full power of the what is likely the world’s most sophisticated deseasonalization and forecasting package is now at your fingertips and the R prompt, just like any other of the 17960+ CRAN packages. You can read more about this (and the seasonal package) in the Journal of Statistical Software paper by Christoph and myself. This release brings a new upstream release as well as binaries. We continue to support two Linux flavours (theh standard x86_64 as well as armv7l), windows and for a first time two macOS flavour. In addition to the existing Intel binary we now have a native built using the arm64 “M1” chip (with thanks to Kirill for the assist).

  • [LibreOffice] Tender to implement support for editing and creation of a Dynamic Diagram feature (#202108-02)

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free/libre open source (FLOSS) office suite LibreOffice. We are looking for an individual or company to implement support for editing and creation of Dynamic Diagrams. The work has to be developed on LibreOffice master, so that it will be released in the next major version. The task is to solve the following problem: Our existing “SmartArt” import uses the fallback stream in OOX files (and has some issues). It therefore gives us only the draw shapes that are imported, so we lose the original layout. Additionally, in older file versions we don’t have the cached shapes, and therefore can’t render anything. The solution we seek, and as such the scope of this tender, is to have a schema driven diagram layout as a core feature. This should be interoperable with OOX (at least MSO2016) and have suitable extensions for ODF. It should layout interoperability, and allow editing of the underlying data, and selection of a schema.

  • Cinelerra Enters Sparky Linux

    Cinelerra is one of the most advanced, open-source non-linear video editors and compositors for Linux. Turn your Linux box into a complete audio and video production environment.

  • The Brains Behind the Books – Part VIII: Julia Faltenbacher

    My name is Julia, I was born in Bremen. This beautiful old Hanseatic city is situated in the north of Germany, close to the North Sea. When I was six years old, my parents and I moved to Rosenheim in Bavaria, which is on the southern end of Germany. Rosenheim is a rather small city, close to the Alps. I consider this my first “experience abroad”, as Bavarian people are very different to the Northern German people. They have a very strong accent and a special dialect. It took me years to understand the Bavarian dialect, and I still can’t talk like them. And still, I am learning new Bavarian words I have never heard before.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers