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Gadgets

Sailfish OS 4.1 brings new apps, features, and bug fixes, as support ends for the Jolla Phone

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OS
Gadgets

Sailfish OS is a Linux-based operating system for mobile devices that made its debut on the Jolla Phone, which first shipped in 2013. Jolla shifted its focus from hardware to software years ago, and with Sailfish OS 4.1 rolling out now, the company says it’s ending support for the original Jolla Phone.

Sailfish OS 4.1 does, however, support a number of newer devices including the Jolla C, Jolla Tablet, and several Sailfish Xperia smartphones as well as the Planet Computers Gemini PDA.

The latest version of Sailfish OS also brings a number of bug fixes and a handful of new apps and features.

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Guest Post: In Linux smartphones we trust

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

What would have been inconceivable just a few years ago is now a reality – there are two mainline Linux phones on the market. The PinePhone from Pine64 and Librem 5 from Purism don’t use old and SoC-specific Android kernels, nor do they rely on binary blobs to enable core device functionality.

While PINE64 and Purism may have been the first to the market with their respective devices, I have reasons to believe they won’t be the last. Interest in these devices is steadily growing and people outside the Linux community are now taking notice. To me it looks like something more than a temporary fad – I don’t want to jinx it, but I think Linux smartphones are here to stay.

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Huawei launches a Linux laptop with an ARM-based Kirin 990 processor

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Linux
Gadgets

Over the last few years Chinese electronics company has been reducing its reliance on tech from other countries in response to trade restrictions imposed by the US. That’s meant developing a home-grown Android alternative for smartphones (albeit one that’s largely based on Android so far).

Now Huawei has launched its first laptop that doesn’t feature an Intel or AMD chip. The Huawei Qingyun L410 is powered by Huwaei’s own Kirin 990 processor, an ARM-based chip that was initially developed for smartphones and tablets.

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Hands-On Video Gives Us a Closer Look at the JingPad Linux Tablet

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Linux
Gadgets

JingOS developers are gearing up to launch a crowdfunding campaign for the iPad-inspired slate next month. But, ahead of that they give us an up-close look at the hardware itself in a video preview.

Sadly, it’s not my hands doing the previewing, but those of a JingOS developer. JingPad reviews from independent/third party folks will, I’m told, appear around the time that the crowdfunding campaign goes live.

In this video a JingOS dev gives us a tour of the JingPad A1 hardware on the first unit fresh out of the factory. We get to see the premium-looking gorilla glass back (though lacking a fingerprint resistant coating foe now); discover that the A1 has a front 8MP camera and 16MP rear facing camera; and learn that the power/lock button comes with a built-in fingerprint sensor — a nice touch.

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Begining with nemomobile

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

There is an effort to build friendly, mobile, and open Qt based user interface since Meego Harmatan and Nokia N9 was widely used. The Jolla Ltd. did pretty nice job with Sailfish OS in the past. I am still using Jolla 1, which now reached its EOL. Its time to look on new options. My hacker’s heart belongs to open source. I am lucky that there is a nemomobile project for me.

The system was originally based on mer-project which was derivative of Intel’s MeeGo and Nokia MeeGo. At the time of introduction, it has very advanced features such as wayland or systemd. Currently, it is sticking with old version packages especially old Qt. Therefore nemo decided to move somewhere else.

First step was switch to Fedora. It showed up that Fedora have to new packages and to fast development. For instance the package tut is relying on python based builder called waf, which is not working with python 3.7. I was considering preparing COPR repository, but my progress was rather slow to reach dream goal. Second step was going to Manjaro Linux which is derivative of Arch Linux.

Sergey has prepared packages for x86_64 and aarch64 and rootfs image for PinePhone. The status is between alpha version and something before alpha version. It just boots into UI and shows the desktop. Even image gallery doesn’t work.

PureTryOut is working on postmarketOS port. Currently it is master branch so anyone can try it. The images for Pine Phone are available as well. The postmarketOS already have some apps for phones, but there will be definitely a lot of work with adaption both glacier and underlying operating system.

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Virtual mouse app for Linux phones makes desktop apps easier to use

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Linux
Gadgets

Linux phones are basically just small, low-power Linux computers with touchscreens, and modems. While most mobile Linux distributions designed for phones feature touch-friendly user interfaces and apps, you can also run desktop applications on a Linux phone.

But you may have trouble actually using software that obviously weren?t designed for small screens, because it can be hard to navigate applications designed for keyboard and mouse input when you?re using a fingertip.

So developer CalcProgrammer1 was looking for a way to use the touchscreen on a Linux phone to emulate a mouse or touchpad. And when he didn?t find one, he decided to build one. It?s called TouchPadEmulator and there?s a proof-of-concept version available at GitLab.

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Librem 14 in Pictures

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Linux
Gadgets

We are excited that the Librem 14 is shipping, and we are so pleased with the production model that we wanted to share some brand new pictures of it inside and out...

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Open source PinePhone modem firmware now supports audio, GPS, and power management

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Gadgets

Most modern smartphones actually run two different operating systems – there’s the one you interact with directly and there’s the firmware running on the modem system-on-a-chip, which is basically like its own little computer.

So even a phone like the PinePhone that’s designed to run free and open source (usually Linux-based) operating systems might ship with closed-source, proprietary firmware installed on the phone’s Quectel E25-G modem.

But a few months ago a small team of independent developers released an open source alternative. It was a bit buggy at the time, but it was mostly free of proprietary “blobs.”

Since then, developers Biktor and Konrad Konrad have continued working on their software, and it’s now pretty close to being a fully functional replacement for the PinePhone’s default modem firmware.

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Have You Heard About These Secured Linux Phones?

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Let’s have a look into some of the secured Linux phones available right now in the market with their specifications.

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Do you really want Linux phones

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Gadgets

The community around Linux phones is interesting. The phones do sell to a lot of people, but it seems a lot of those people come back to complain that Linux phones isn't what they expected it is.

For some reason all the distributions for the PinePhone are bending over backwards to provide an android or ios experience on the phone. The operating systems are judged on the amount of apps preinstalled and every tiny issue labels the distribution as completely unusable.

Stability doesn't matter at all, as long as there are features! more features! Doesn't matter there are 20 patches on top of every package and things aren't upstreamed. Doesn't matter if the kernel is full of hacks with no upstream in sight for most things.

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More in Tux Machines

Can You Run Linux Without a Desktop Environment?

While modern Linux systems have attractive desktop interfaces, you may be wondering whether you can use Linux without them. The straightforward answer is "yes." What Is a Desktop Environment? While the desktop environments on Windows and macOS are tightly integrated and built into the system, on Linux, desktop environments like GNOME, KDE, and Xfce are just collections of programs that you can install in addition to the base operating system. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Oracle v. Google: What the verdict means for open source | InfoWorld

    The decade-long legal battle between two of the world’s largest tech companies has finally come to an end. The result was a victory for the open-source software community. In case you need a refresher on the Oracle v. Google case, Oracle sued Google in 2010 for copyright infringement on Google’s use of Oracle’s Java API in its Android smartphone operating system. The District Court ruled in favor of Google, but that decision was later reversed on appeal. The case ultimately landed in the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled six to two in Google’s favor this April.

  • Jupyter Labs Desktop App: What Is It & Do We Need It?
  • Apple's M1 MacBook screens are stunning – stunningly fragile and defective, that is, lawsuits allege

    Aggrieved MacBook owners in two separate lawsuits claim Apple's latest laptops with its M1 chips have defective screens that break easily and malfunction. The complaints, both filed on Wednesday in a federal district court in San Jose, California, are each seeking class certification in the hope that the law firms involved will get a judicial blessing to represent the presumed large group of affected customers and, if victorious, to share any settlement. Each of the filings contends Apple's 2020-2021 MacBook line – consisting of the M1-based MacBook Air and M1-based 13" MacBook Pro – have screens that frequently fail. They say Apple knew about the alleged defect or should have known, based on its own extensive internal testing, reports from technicians, and feedback from customers.

  • A Burger King where the only Whopper is the BSOD font

    Bork goes back to its roots today, with a screen of purest blue showing its unwanted face outside a US Burger King branch. At least it makes a change from McDonald's, very much the DNS of Bork when it comes to failures. In this instance, it looks like it is the exterior signage, normally showing a slideshow of tasty (and frequently greasy) treats, that has succumbed to the curse of Microsoft.

  • RISC-V Launches the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance

    RISC-V International, a global open hardware standards organization, announced the launch of the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance. The global Alliance, created by CHIPS Alliance, OpenPOWER Foundation, RISC-V, and Western Digital, will develop and provide learning and networking programs, mentorship opportunities and inclusive environments across the expansive ecosystem of open hardware. The Alliance will be focused on supporting professional advancement and encouraging equal participation for women and underrepresented individuals in the open hardware community.

  • ASUS Tinker Board 2S: High-performance Raspberry Pi alternative

    The long-awaited ASUS Tinker Board 2S is out. And there's a lot packed into the 85 x 56 mm Raspberry Pi form factor. At the heart of the Tinker Board 2S is a Rockchip RK3399 chipset that combines two ARM Cortex-A72 cores, four ARM Cortex-A53 cores, and an ARM Mali-T860 MP4 GPU. The board comes with 2GB or 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, and 16 GB of eMMC flash.

  • Value Stream Management: Bringing Lean Manufacturing Techniques To IBM i Development - IT Jungle [Ed: Another example of grotesque conflict of interest by IBM. This ‘article’ is about IBM and is also sponsored by IBM.]
  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Continued Growth in Community Contributions and Adoption as Mainframes Accelerate Innovation in Enterprise Hybrid Technology [Ed: "Linux" Foundation is openwashing IBM to make a monopoly seem like "community"]

    The Open Mainframe Project kicked off the 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit today with news of record growth in contributions - with more than 105.31 Million Lines of Code written and over 9,600 commits submitted by Open Mainframe Project communities so far this year. This is 100 percent more code than last year with an increased number of active participants in the 20 project and working groups. These numbers will only increase as Open Mainframe continues to be the cornerstone of governance and innovation for modernizing the mainframe and its path to IoT, Cloud and Edge Computing.

today's howtos

  • How to use wall command in linux - Unixcop

    wall is (an abbreviation of write to all) is a Unix command-line utility that displays the contents of a computer file or standard input to all logged-in users. It is used by root to send out shutting down message to all users just before poweroff. It displays a message on the terminals of all logged-in users. The messages can_be either typed on the terminal or the contents of a file. Also usually, system administrators send messages to announce maintenance and ask users to log out and close all open programs.The messages ‘re shown to all logged in users with a terminal open.

  • Any Port in a Storm: Ports and Security, Part 1

    When IT and Security professionals talk about port numbers, we’re referring to the TCP and UDP port numbers a service is running on that are waiting to accept connections. But what exactly is a port?

  • Book Review: Data Science at the Command Line By Jeroen Janssens

    Data Science at the Command Line: Obtain, Scrub, Explore, and Model Data with Unix Power Tools written by Jeroen Janssens is the second edition of the series “Data Science at the Command Line”. This book demonstrates how the flexibility of the command line can help you become a more efficient and productive data scientist. You will learn how to combine small yet powerful command-line tools to quickly obtain, scrub, explore, and model your data. To get you started, author Jeroen Janssens provides a Docker image packed with over 80 tools–useful whether you work with Windows, macOS, or Linux.

  • How to Take a Typing Test on Linux With tt

    In the modern era of technology, typing has become one of the most common activities for a lot of professions. Learning to type faster with accuracy can help you get more things done in the same amount of time. However, touch typing is not a skill that you can master overnight. It takes regular practice and testing to improve your speed and accuracy gradually. While there are a lot of websites that help you achieve this, all you essentially need on Linux is a terminal. Let's see how.

  • FIX: Google Chrome doesn’t work on Kali linux
  • How to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

Security and DRM Leftovers