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Gadgets

Linux Gadgets and Android-based, Linux-power ColorOS 6.0

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OS
Android
Linux
Gadgets
  • 12 Holiday Gifts for Your Linux Loved Ones (All Under $59)
  • ColorOS 6.0 Announced By Oppo, Welcome A Brighter OS With Machine Learning

    As stated above Oppo just announced their latest smartphone operating system called ColorOS 6.0. The ColorOS 6.0 brings a whole new UI with its light theme and brighter colours and is based on the latest Android 9.0. According to Oppo, the OS is made keeping bezel-less phones in mind but don’t worry, it doesn’t mean it won’t come to other Oppo phones, however, the navigation will be of more ease on devices with a comparably larger display. The list of devices that will support the new OS still hasn’t surfaced just yet.

    This new UI overhaul is breathtaking and as compared to the previous ColorOS 5.2.1 brings a lot more feature simultaneously being faster in performance and provides a better user experience. It uses a lighter color scheme combining with different soft gradients. Diving deeper into the UI section, ColorOS 6.0 brings a whole new font type. This new font type is called Oppo Sans made in collaboration with the Chinese font firm Hanyi.

Give the gift of freedom this year!

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GNU
Gadgets

As the end-of-the-year gift-giving season approaches, we have a dilemma: how do we give the people in our lives the gifts they want without subjecting them to software that violates their user freedoms? So many new gadgets are loaded with digital gremlins that can take all of the fun out of the holidays, using proprietary software to sneak in surveillance, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), and other malware in along with the functions we actually want these items to serve.

Every year, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) offers you an easy solution: our Ethical Tech Giving Guide! The Giving Guide is back with version 9, and loaded with tech you can feel good about giving your loved ones -- and it also highlights some dangerous devices that are better left on the shelf.

We create resources like the Ethical Tech Giving Guide because software freedom is necessary to our overall freedom. Will you propel the free software movement to new frontiers by supporting the FSF? Our annual fundraiser is happening right now, and we want to welcome 400 new Associate Members before December 31st. As a special bonus, all new and renewing Annual Associate Members ($120+) can choose to receive a set of enamel pins. Become a member or make a donation today.

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Sailfish 3 Day Celebration

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Linux
Gadgets

The third generation of Sailfish OS is here, and we call it Sailfish 3! After months of hard work to get Sailfish 3 out in the wild, we have now released this rather big update to Sailfish powered devices. With that said, we surely wanted to celebrate the occasion and arranged two events: one in Helsinki, and another one in Berlin. Thanks to all of you who attended! Below a short description what happened, and what the mood was like.

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Also: Smaller Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Announced with 5GHz Wi-Fi and 1.4GHz CPU for $25

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

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Reviews
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work.

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Samsung announce Linux on DeX with Ubuntu: for developers on the move

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

The Samsung Developer Conference, held this week in San Francisco, brings creators together to discover and learn about the latest technologies in Samsung’s portfolio and further afield. One of the technologies showcased, following the initial demo in 2017, is Samsung’s Linux on DeX. Samsung DeX, launched last year, lets users of Samsung flagship Galaxy devices enjoy apps on a bigger screen for a better viewing experience, whether watching films, playing games or just browsing the web.

This year, Samsung is announcing the beta launch of Linux on DeX which extends the value of Samsung DeX to Linux developers. Linux on DeX empowers developers to build apps within a Linux development environment by connecting their Galaxy device to a larger screen for a PC-like experience.

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Also: Ubuntu Linux On Samsung Galaxy Devices Finally Reaches Beta (Samsung DeX)

Librem 5 general development report

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Gadgets
  • Librem 5 general development report — October 15th, 2018

    Hi everyone! Phew, it has been a busy and exciting time these last several weeks. Here is a fairly detailed summary of the progress that has been made on the various pieces of the Librem 5 project.

    [...]

    In phosh, there have been many bugs fixed and the code has been cleaned up. Also an effort has gone towards translations, updating the German and French translations as well as standardizing the po headers to hopefully make it less confusing for new translators.

  • Purism Shares The Latest Librem 5 Smartphone Progress - Dev Kits Going Out Soon

    Purism has shared the latest details on their efforts to deliver the open-source Linux Librem 5 smartphone to market in 2019.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

    Right on the heels of UBport's OTA-4 release comes the official 16.04 version of Ubuntu Touch for mobile devices. This will be the fifth Over The Air update (OTA-5), and it will also be the first of many updates that now adhere to a regular release roadmap.

    While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch development.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Being Prepped With New Browser, Qt Auto Scaling

    The UBports community that continues to maintain Ubuntu Touch for a range of mobile devices will soon be rolling out Ubuntu Touch OTA-5.

    Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 is bringing its new "Morph" web-browser powered by Qt WebEngine to replace the old Oxide-based browser application, support for Qt automatic scaling, Kirigami 2 support, and new community artwork.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Out for Ubuntu Phones with New Morph Browser, Improvements

    The UBports community announced today that they begin work on the next OTA (Over-the-Air) update for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system for Ubuntu Phone devices.

    With the Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 finally rebasing the mobile OS on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the UBports team can now concentrate their efforts on bringing more new features and improvements, which will land in the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 release.

    "While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch," reads today's announcement.

Linux users want (and deserve) shiny things too

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Linux
Gadgets

Nokia’s adventures and misadventures in Linux land inspired and gave birth to a few similar attempts, both from commercial for-profit companies and from open source communities. Just as the Nokia N800 was making rounds in tech circles, the Openmoko project was already trying to rally the open source community around the ideals of open source software as well as open source hardware. While it did generate a lot more interest within the community, it didn’t have the coffers that allowed Nokia to throw money at the Maemo platform, at least for a while.

And then the Nokia that we knew was no more. Out of its ashes rose Finnish startup Jolla, who picked up the pieces that Nokia left, like Mer, the abandoned lovechild of Nokia’s Maemo and Intel’s MeeGo. It almost seemed like Jolla and its Sailfish OS would be able to carry on that legacy. Unfortunately, Jolla’s good fortune didn’t last that long.

From Maemo to Openmoko to Mer, many of the Linux-based mobile platform built their GUIs around the GTK+ toolkit and, to some extent, the GNOME desktop environment libraries. The version of Maemo in the Nokia N9 as well as Sailfish OS would use the competing Qt toolkit, which Nokia received when it acquired Trolltech and eventually lost when it itself got bought by Microsoft. Partly inspired by these trends, the KDE community started their own mobile efforts through the Plasma Active project. But while its ill-fated Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of day, Plasma Active would eventually mature into Plasma Mobile and strike its own path, independent of a specific, self-designed device.

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Sailfish 3 is at your doorstep

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Gadgets

Rolling out Sailfish 3 this autumn has been our biggest objective this year and we’re happy to report the latest status. It’s time for an update and awaited schedule news.

As we mentioned already in our original Sailfish 3 announcement in Mobile World Congress back in February, Sailfish 3 is a result of rigorous development work done together with Jolla’s licensing partners and the Sailfish community over the course of 2017-2018 – thanks to all of you for the cooperation and contributions! The third generation of our operating system will have clear new benefits for all of its users, be it corporate licensing customers, our developer community members, or daily Sailfish users.

Jolla has always embraced the methodology of continuous development and continuous releases, and Sailfish 3 is no exception. Sailfish 3 is rolled out in phases, and in fact, our latest software update Nurmonjoki already included a few of the new features. Albeit perhaps more relevant for the corporate customers, those still have belonged to our Sailfish 3 list all the time. These items included e.g. VPN improvements and MDM (Mobile Device Management) functionalities.

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New Distro Releases: EasyOS Buster 2.1.3, EasyOS Pyro 1.2.3 and IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136

  • EasyOS Buster version 2.1.3 released

    EasyOS version 2.1.3, latest in the "Buster" series, has been released. This is another incremental upgrade, however, as the last release announced on Distrowatch is version 2.1, the bug fixes, improvements and upgrades have been considerable since then. So much, that I might request the guys at Distrowatch to announce version 2.1.3.

  • EasyOS Pyro version 1.2.3 released

    Another incremental release of the Pyro series. Although this series is considered to be in maintenance mode, it does have all of the improvements as in the latest Buster release.

  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136 is available for testing

    the summer has been a quiet time for us with a little relaxation, but also some shifted focus on our infrastructure and other things. But now we are back with a large update which is packed with important new features and fixes.

Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3
    So we've had a fairly quiet last week, but I think it was good that we
    ended up having that extra week and the final rc8.
    
    Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather
    than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in,
    including some for some bad btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some
    unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also
    had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues.
    
    One _particularly_ last-minute revert is the top-most commit (ignoring
    the version change itself) done just before the release, and while
    it's very annoying, it's perhaps also instructive.
    
    What's instructive about it is that I reverted a commit that wasn't
    actually buggy. In fact, it was doing exactly what it set out to do,
    and did it very well. In fact it did it _so_ well that the much
    improved IO patterns it caused then ended up revealing a user-visible
    regression due to a real bug in a completely unrelated area.
    
    The actual details of that regression are not the reason I point that
    revert out as instructive, though. It's more that it's an instructive
    example of what counts as a regression, and what the whole "no
    regressions" kernel rule means. The reverted commit didn't change any
    API's, and it didn't introduce any new bugs. But it ended up exposing
    another problem, and as such caused a kernel upgrade to fail for a
    user. So it got reverted.
    
    The point here being that we revert based on user-reported _behavior_,
    not based on some "it changes the ABI" or "it caused a bug" concept.
    The problem was really pre-existing, and it just didn't happen to
    trigger before. The better IO patterns introduced by the change just
    happened to expose an old bug, and people had grown to depend on the
    previously benign behavior of that old issue.
    
    And never fear, we'll re-introduce the fix that improved on the IO
    patterns once we've decided just how to handle the fact that we had a
    bad interaction with an interface that people had then just happened
    to rely on incidental behavior for before. It's just that we'll have
    to hash through how to do that (there are no less than three different
    patches by three different developers being discussed, and there might
    be more coming...). In the meantime, I reverted the thing that exposed
    the problem to users for this release, even if I hope it will be
    re-introduced (perhaps even backported as a stable patch) once we have
    consensus about the issue it exposed.
    
    Take-away from the whole thing: it's not about whether you change the
    kernel-userspace ABI, or fix a bug, or about whether the old code
    "should never have worked in the first place". It's about whether
    something breaks existing users' workflow.
    
    Anyway, that was my little aside on the whole regression thing.  Since
    it's that "first rule of kernel programming", I felt it is perhaps
    worth just bringing it up every once in a while.
    
    Other than that aside, I don't find a lot to really talk about last
    week. Drivers, networking (and network drivers), arch updates,
    selftests. And a few random fixes in various other corners. The
    appended shortlog is not overly long, and gives a flavor for the
    changes.
    
    And this obviously means that the merge window for 5.4 is open, and
    I'll start doing pull requests for that tomorrow. I already have a
    number of them in my inbox, and I appreciate all the people who got
    that over and done with early,
    
                    Linus
    
  • Linux Kernel 5.3 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds announced today the release of the Linux 5.3 kernel series, a major that brings several new features, dozens of improvements, and updated drivers. Two months in the works and eight RC (Release Candidate) builds later, the final Linux 5.3 kernel is now available, bringing quite some interesting additions to improve hardware support, but also the overall performance. Linux kernel 5.3 had an extra Release Candidate because of Linus Torvalds' travel schedule, but it also brought in a few needed fixes. "Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in, including some for some bad Btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues," said Linus Torvalds.

  • Linux 5.3 Kernel Released With AMD Navi Support, Intel Speed Select & More

    Linus Torvalds just went ahead and released the Linux 5.3 kernel as stable while now opening the Linux 5.4 merge window. There was some uncertainty whether Linux 5.3 would have to go into extra overtime due to a getrandom() system call issue uncovered by an unrelated EXT4 commit. Linus ended up reverting the EXT4 commit for the time being.

Kubernetes Leftovers

  • With its Kubernetes bet paying off, Cloud Foundry doubles down on developer experience

    More than 50% of the Fortune 500 companies are now using the open-source Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service project — either directly or through vendors like Pivotal — to build, test and deploy their applications. Like so many other projects, including the likes of OpenStack, Cloud Foundry went through a bit of a transition in recent years as more and more developers started looking to containers — and especially the Kubernetes project — as a platform on which to develop. Now, however, the project is ready to focus on what always differentiated it from its closed- and open-source competitors: the developer experience.

  • Kubernetes in the Enterprise: A Primer

    As Kubernetes moves deeper into the enterprise, its growth is having an impact on the ecosystem at large. When Kubernetes came on the scene in 2014, it made an impact and continues to impact the way companies build software. Large companies have backed it, causing a ripple effect in the industry and impacting open source and commercial systems. To understand how K8S will continue to affect the industry and change the traditional enterprise data center, we must first understand the basics of Kubernetes.

  • Google Cloud rolls out Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes

    Google Cloud is trialling alpha availability of a new platform for data scientists and engineers through Kubernetes. Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes combines open source, machine learning and cloud to help modernise big data resource management. The alpha availability will first start with workloads on Apache Spark, with more environments to come.

  • Google announces alpha of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes

    Not surprisingly, Google, the company that created K8s, thinks the answer to that question is yes. And so, today, the company is announcing the Alpha release of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes (K8s Dataproc), allowing Spark to run directly on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE)-based K8s clusters. The service promises to reduce complexity, in terms of open source data components' inter-dependencies, and portability of Spark applications. That should allow data engineers, analytics experts and data scientists to run their Spark workloads in a streamlined way, with less integration and versioning hassles.

IBM/Red Hat: Fedora's Power Architecture Builds, WebSphere/WebLogic's Demise, Red Hat’s David Egts

  • Fedora Is Beginning To Spin Workstation & Live Images For POWER

    If you are running the likes of the Raptor Blackbird for a POWER open-source desktop and wanting to run Fedora on it, currently you need to use the Fedora "server" CLI installer and from there install the desired packages for a desktop. But moving forward, Fedora is beginning to spin Workstation and Live images for PPC64LE. Complementing Fedora's Power Architecture images of Fedora Everything and Fedora Server, Workstation and Live images are being assembled. This is much more convenient for those wanting an IBM POWER Linux desktop thanks to the success of the Raptor Blackbird with most Linux distributions just offering the server/CLI (non-desktop) images by default for PPC64LE.

  • Are Application Servers Dying a Slow Death?

    There has been concern for nearly five years application servers are dead. Truth be told, they are not dead, but is their usage in decline? The simple answer is yes. Over the years, it appears corporate environments have decided the "return on investment" is not there when looking at Java application servers. On the surface, one might assume that the likes of WebSphere or WebLogic might be the ones in decline due to cost. Perhaps it is just affecting the proprietary choices, while their open source based derivatives are growing or remaining steady? Appears not. Whichever Java application server you choose, all of them are in a state of decline. Whether it be proprietary options such as WebSphere or WebLogic, or open source alternatives JBoss or Tomcat, all are in decline based on employment listings we review. However, they are not declining at the same pace. From our collection of data, WebSphere and WebLogic's decline has been more muted. The rate of reduction for each of these application servers is in the neighborhood of 25-35% over the last couple years. At the same time, the likes of JBoss and Tomcat have declined around 40-45%. Not a drastic difference, but one that still is notable.

  • Red Hat’s David Egts: Commercial Open Source Software to Drive Federal IT Modernization

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s (NYSE: RHT) North American public sector division, advises federal agencies to adopt commercial open source software to help advance their information technology modernization efforts, GovCon Wire reported Aug. 23. He said Aug. 22 in an FCW thought piece that agencies should seek software vendors that are well-versed in open source technology as well as government security certifications in order to successfully modernize federal IT processes.