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Debian

KNOPPIX 8.6.0 Public Release

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Debian

Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware.

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English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019.

It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations.

The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support.

Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions.

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Emmabuntus DE2 1.05 Released, Which Reduces ISO Image Size

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Emmabuntus Team is pleased to announce the release of the new Emmabuntüs Debian Edition 2 1.05 (32 and 64 bits) on 02nd Aug, 2019.

It’s based on Debian 9.9 stretch distribution and featuring the XFCE desktop environment.

This is a lightweight distribution, which was designed to run on older computers.

This distribution was originally designed to facilitate the reconditioning of computers donated to humanitarian organizations, starting with the Emmaüs communities.

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Debian celebrates 26 years, Happy DebianDay!

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Debian

26 years ago today in a single post to the comp.os.linux.development newsgroup, Ian Murdock announced the completion of a brand new Linux release named ##Debian.

Since that day we’ve been into outer space, typed over 1,288,688,830 lines of code, spawned over 300 derivatives, were enhanced with 6,155 known contributors, and filed over 975,619 bug reports.

We are home to a community of thousands of users around the globe, we gather to host our annual Debian Developers Conference #DebConf">DebConf which spans the world in a different country each year, and of course today's many "#DebianDay celebrations held around the world.

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APT Patterns

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Software
Debian

Patterns allow you to specify complex search queries to select the packages you want to install/show. For example, the pattern ?garbage can be used to find all packages that have been automatically installed but are no longer depended upon by manually installed packages. Or the pattern ?automatic allows you find all automatically installed packages.

You can combine patterns into more complex ones; for example, ?and(?automatic,?obsolete) matches all automatically installed packages that do not exist any longer in a repository.

There are also explicit targets, so you can perform queries like ?for x: ?depends(?recommends(x)): Find all packages x that depend on another package that recommends x. I do not fully comprehend those yet - I did not manage to create a pattern that matches all manually installed packages that a meta-package depends upon. I am not sure it is possible.

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Best desktop environments for Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Under Linux the desktop environment, or graphical environment is independent of the OS (Operating system) in contrast to Windows which, as its name says, incorporated windows as part of its core rather than an optional feature we could add to MS-DOS. I won’t explain deeply that Linux is a kernel rather than an OS and all additional components are complementary including the graphical environment but it is what brings the flexibility on tools choice.
Initially Linux wasn’t developed for domestic use, based on Unix it provided multiuser, multitask and networking functions and the graphical environment wasn’t an initial priority, actually in contrast to Windows servers Linux servers lack of graphical environment because it is unnecessary (but optional, as with any Linux installation).

For domestic or professional use, users need a graphical interface of which you can choose among many options, some of which will be explained in this article.

The disclaimer is no one can affirm what the best desktop environments are since the choice is based on individual needs and tastes, this article lists some desktop environments currently remain unused like Fluxbox because I consider it great, sadly the Linux community disagreed.

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Orange Pi Zero2 is a Tiny Allwinner H6 SBC with HDMI 2.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet & WiFi

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Debian
Ubuntu

It’s always frustrating to see boards with USB 3.0 and Fast Ethernet, since there’s no benefit over USB 2.0 for networked storage. But this is usually to cut costs, and in this case the PCB’s size may have been a problem to accommodate the extra transceiver required for Gigabit Ethernet.

Supported operating systems are said to be Android7.0, Ubuntu, and Debian, but this information is not always correct before launch. The good news is that Orange Pi 3 SBC, also powered by Allwinner H6 processor, is supported in Armbian, albeit only with WIP Debian 10 and Ubuntu 18.04 images, meaning they are suitable for testing, but not necessarily stable.

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SparkyLinux Gets New Development Cycle Based on Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye"

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Linux
Debian

Work on the SparkyLinux "Po Tolo" series has started as a semi-rolling release version where users install the operating system once and receive updates forever. The first snapshot, SparkyLinux 2019.08, is now available to download based on the software repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye."

SparkyLinux 2019.08 "Po Tolo" is contains an updated system from the Debian Testing repositories as of August 1st, 2019, and comes with the GCC 9 system-wide compiler, though GCC 8 is still used by default. This release is powered by Linux kernel 4.19.37, though Linux kernel 5.2.5 is available on the SparkyLinux unstable repos.

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Freedombone version 4.0

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Debian

The Freedombone project is pleased to announce the launch of version 4.0, based upon Debian 10. At the end of the second decade of the 21st century the shattered remains of the open web are a site of ongoing struggle. The freedom to communicate with others securely and in a manner of your own choosing, and to own your data, is increasingly threatened.

Superficially, decentralized systems appear to be gaining ground, but the harsh reality is that the internet has become highly concentrated around a few companies with unprecedented political influence.

There is no freedom without freedom of association. That is, having the ability to define who you are and what kind of community you want to live in. This release includes Community Networks as an initial step towards networks run by and for the people who use them.

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Also: Freedomebone 4.0 released

Bits from the [Debian] Stable Release Managers

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Debian

Hi,

Introduction
============

The Stable Release Managers, with the support of the rest of the
Release Team, are responsible for updates to the stable release (and
oldstable while that suite is also being supported by the Security
Team), via point releases and the stable-updates mechanism [STABLE-
PDATES].

You can see the current status of proposed updates to stable via our
BTS pseudo-package [BTS] and our tracking website. [QUEUE-VIEWER]

First 'buster' point release
============================

The first point release for Debian 10 has been scheduled for 7th
September 2019. That is slightly later after buster's initial release 
than we would normally aim for, but an earlier date has proved
difficult with DebConf and holidays.

A point release for 'stretch', Debian 9.10, will also take place on the
same day.

Following the release of 10.1, we will continue to aim for stable point
releases on an approximately two-month basis, and oldstable every three
to four months.

As always, the first update to a new release is very busy, so we ask
for your patience if you are still awaiting a reply to an upload
request. It may be that an update to your package is deferred to a
later point release purely from a workload perspective; more serious or
more urgent fixes will be prioritised.

Workflow
========

Uploads to a supported stable release should target their suite name in
the changelog, i.e. 'buster' or 'stretch'. You should normally use
reportbug and the release.debian.org pseudo-package to send a *source*
debdiff, rationale and associated bug numbers to the Stable Release
Managers, and await a request to upload or further information.

If you are confident that the upload will be accepted without changes,
please feel free to upload at the same time as filing the
release.debian.org bug. However if you are new to the process, we would
recommend getting approval before uploading so you get a chance to see
if your expectations align with ours.

Either way, there must be an accompanying bug for tracking, and your
upload must comply with the acceptance criteria below.

Update criteria
===============

Here's a reminder of our usual criteria for accepting fixes. These are
designed to help the process be as smooth and frustration-free as
possible for both you and us.

   * The bug you want to fix in stable must be fixed in unstable
     already (and not waiting in NEW or the delayed queue)
   * The bug should be of severity "important" or higher
   * Bug meta-data - particularly affected versions - must be
     up to date
   * Fixes must be minimal and relevant and include a sufficiently
     detailed changelog entry
   * A source debdiff of the proposed change must be included
     in your request (not just the raw patches or "a debdiff
     can be found at $URL")
   * The proposed package must have a correct version number
     (e.g. ...+deb10u1 for buster or +deb9u1 for stretch) and you
     should be able to explain what testing it has had
   * The update must be built in an (old)stable environment or chroot
   * Fixes for security issues should be co-ordinated with the
     Security Team, unless they have explicitly stated that they
     will not issue an DSA for the bug (e.g. via a "no-dsa" marker
     in the Security Tracker) [SECURITY-TRACKER]

Please don't post a message on the debian-release mailing list and
expect it not to get lost - there must be a bug report against
release.debian.org.

We make extensive use of usertags to sort and manage requests, so
unless you particularly enjoy crafting bug meta-data, reportbug is
generally the best way of generating your request. Incorrectly tagged
reports may take longer to be noticed and processed.

Thanks,

Adam,
for the SRMs

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Also: Debian 10.1 Expected For Release In One Month

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The ClockworkPi GameShell is a super fun DIY spin on portable gaming

Portable consoles are hardly new, and thanks to the Switch, they’re basically the most popular gaming devices in the world. But ClockworkPi’s GameShell is something totally unique, and entirely refreshing when it comes to gaming on the go. This clever DIY console kit provides everything you need to assemble your own pocket gaming machine at home, running Linux-based open-source software and using an open-source hardware design that welcomes future customization. The GameShell is the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, which began shipping to its backers last year and is now available to buy either direct from the company or from Amazon. The $159.99 ( on sale for $139.99 as of this writing) includes everything you need to build the console, like the ClockworkPi quad-core Cortex A7 motherboard with integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 1GB of DDR3 RAM — but it comes unassembled. Read more

KNOPPIX 8.6.0 Public Release

Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware. Read more English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Linux 5.3 Kernel Yielding The Best Performance Yet For AMD EPYC "Rome" CPU Performance

Among many different Linux/open-source benchmarks being worked on for the AMD EPYC "Rome" processors now that our initial launch benchmarks are out of the way are Linux distribution comparisons, checking out the BSD compatibility, and more. Some tests I wrapped up this weekend were seeing how recent Linux kernel releases perform on the AMD EPYC 7742 64-core / 128-thread processors. For some weekend analysis, here are benchmarks of Linux 4.18 through Linux 5.3 in its current development form. All tests were done on the same AMD EPYC 7742 2P server running Ubuntu 19.04 and using the latest kernels in each series via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. Read more

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test. All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere. Read more