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Debian

UCS 4.4-7: Seventh Point Release of UCS 4.4

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Debian

We have just published the seventh point release: UCS 4.4-7 comes with various improvements and some new features, for example in the Self Service app and in the portal. We have also added a new Samba version and worked on the S4 Connector. In this article, I’d like to describe the most important changes.

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Debian: Installing Debian Testing and Debian Developer Reports

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Debian
  • Install Debian Testing ( the most recent bullseye weekly build ) with KDE Plasma on bare metal

    It appears that straight forward install Debian Testing via official ISO image at least in meantime hangs . Looks like "sddm" hangs attempting to pop up logging screen prompt

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, November 2020

    I was assigned 16 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 4.5 hours from earlier months. I worked 11.5 hours this month, so I will carry over 9 hours to December.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-11

    This month just went past way too fast, didn’t get to all the stuff I wanted to, but managed to cover many essentials (not even listed here) that I’ll cover in follow-up posts. In particular, highlights that I’m thankful for are that we’ve selected the final artwork for Bullseye. We’ve also successfully hosted another two MiniDebConfs. One that was gaming themed, and a Brazilian event all in Portuguese! Videos are up on Debian’s PeerTube instance (Gaming Edition | Brazil) and on the DebConf video archive for direct download.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities November 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

IKOULA hosts Raspberry Pi 4 “micro server” for 4.99+ Euros per month

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Debian
Ubuntu

Hosting services for Arm single board computers where you pay a monthly fee for a board, and have it hosted in a datacenter with Internet access and easy provisioning have been around for over six years.

Last summer, we reported that Mythic Beasts and mini Nodes had added Raspberry Pi 4 hosting plans to their offerings, and others commented there were also other companies. But I’ve just been informed IKOULA, a hosting company based in France, had introduced Raspberry Pi 4 “micro server” hosting plans starting at just 4.99 Euros ex. VAT per month.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2020

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 657

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 657 for the week of November 8 – 14, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Cybersecurity defenses for IIoT | Ubuntu

    Cybersecurity attacks on industrial IoT solutions can have detrimental consequences. This is the case because IoT devices record privacy-sensitive data and control production assets. Therefore, demonstrable trustworthiness is prerequisite to IoT adoption in industrial settings.

    Fortunately, IT security is a mature field. Experts have identified classes of threats devices may be subject to. Let’s discuss these threat patterns and mitigation strategies in the IIoT context.

This Is the Default Theme of Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

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Debian

The winner is Juliette Taka and her artwork “Homeworld” will be used as the default theme for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye,” the next major version of the popular Linux-based operating system. The artwork will be used as default wallpaper, login screen, installer, etc.

Juliette Taka works at Logilab and she’s using Debian GNU/Linux for more than seven years. She is known for making illustrations and drawing comics books, and she also made the Lines theme used in Debian GNU/Linux 8 “Jessie” and the softWaves theme used in Debian GNU/Linux 9 “Stretch.”

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"Homeworld" will be the default theme for Debian 11

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Debian

The theme "Homeworld" by Juliette Taka has been selected as default theme for Debian 11 'bullseye'. Juliette says that this theme has been inspired by the Bauhaus movement, an art style born in Germany in the 20th century.

After the Debian Desktop Team made the call for proposing themes, a total of eighteen choices have been submitted. The desktop artwork poll was open to the public, and we received 5,613 responses ranking the different choices, of which Homeworld has been ranked as the winner among them.

This is the third time that a submission by Juliette has won. Juliette is also the author of the lines theme that was used in Debian 8 and the softWaves theme that was used in Debian 9.

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Debian: Kubernetes, Reproducible Builds, and More

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Debian
  • Packaging Kubernetes for Debian [LWN.net]

    Linux distributors are in the business of integrating software from multiple sources, packaging the result, and making it available to their users. It has long been true that some projects are easier to package than others. The Debian technical committee (TC) is currently being asked to make a decision in a dispute over how an especially hard-to-package project — Kubernetes — should be handled. Regardless of the eventual outcome, this disagreement clearly shows how the packaging model used by Linux distributors is increasingly mismatched to how software is often developed in the 2020s; what should replace that model is rather less clear, though.
    A longstanding rule followed by most distributors is that there should be only one copy of any given library (or other dependency) in the system, and that said copy should usually be in its own package. To do otherwise would bloat the system and complicate the task of keeping things secure. As an extreme example, consider what would happen if every program carried its own copy of the C library in its package. Those thousands of copies would consume vast amounts of both storage space and memory. If a security vulnerability were found in that library, thousands of packages would have to be updated to fix it everywhere. A single library package shared by all users, instead, is more efficient and far easier to maintain.

    This rule is thus contrary to the practice of stuffing dependent libraries into the package of a program that needs them — a practice often called "vendoring". Living up to this rule can be challenging, though, with many modern projects, which also often engage in a fair amount of vendoring. Projects written in certain languages appear to be especially prone to this sort of behavior; the Go language, for example, seems to encourage vendoring.

    Kubernetes is written in Go, and it carries a long list of dependencies with it. It was maintained in Debian for a while by Dmitry Smirnov, but he orphaned Kubernetes in 2018, stating that packaging it is "a full time job, probably for more than one person". The Kubernetes package was eventually picked up by Janos Lenart, who has been supplying updated versions to the Debian Testing repository.

  • Reproducible Builds in October 2020 — reproducible-builds.org

    In our monthly reports, we outline the major things that we have been up to over the past month. As a brief reminder, the motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure flaws have not been introduced in the binaries we install on our systems. If you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.

    [...]

    During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh in 2019, developers from the GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian distributions were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical GNU Mes binary despite using three different versions of GCC. Since this summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc, and last month a fuller update was posted to this effect by the individuals involved. This month, however, David Wheeler updated his extensive page on Fully Countering Trusting Trust through Diverse Double-Compiling, remarking that...

    [...]

    Build node maintenance was performed by both Holger Levsen […][…] and Vagrant Cascadian […][…][…], Vagrant Cascadian also updated the page listing the variations made when testing to reflect changes for in build paths […] and Hans-Christoph Steiner made a number of changes for F-Droid, the free software app repository for Android devices, including...

  • My Debian Activities in October 2020 – blog.alteholz.eu

    This month I accepted 208 packages and rejected 29. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 563, so yeah, I was not alone this month Smile.

    Anyway, this month marked another milestone in my NEW package handling. My overall number of ACCEPTed package exceeded the magic number of 20000 packages. This is almost 30% of all packages accepted in Debian. I am a bit proud of this achievement.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • jmtd → log → Borg, confidence in backups, GtkPod and software preservation

    Luckily, other fine folks have worked out reversing all these steps and implemented it in software such as libgpod and its frontend, GtkPod, which is still currently available as a Debian package. It mostly worked, and I got back 95% of the tracks. (It would have been nice if GtkPod had reported the tracks it hadn't recovered, it was aware they existed based on the errors it did print. But you can't have everything.)

    GtkPod is a quirky, erratic piece of software, that is only useful for old Apple equipment that is long out of production, prior to the introduction of the encryption. The upstream homepage is dead, and I suspect it is unmaintained. The Debian package is orphaned. It's been removed from testing, because it won't build with GCC 10. On the other hand, my experience shows that it worked, and was useful for a real problem that someone had today.

    I'm in two minds about GtkPod's fate. On the one hand, I think Debian has far too many packages, with a corresponding burden of maintenance responsibility (for the whole project, not just the individual package maintainers), and there's a quality problem: once upon a time, if software had been packaged in a distribution like Debian, that was a mark of quality, a vote of confidence, and you could have some hope that the software would work and integrate well with the rest of the system. That is no longer true, and hasn't been in my experience for many years. If we were more discerning about what software we included in the distribution, and what we kept, perhaps we could be a leaner distribution, faster to adapt to the changing needs in the world, and of a higher quality.

    On the other hand, this story about GtkPod is just one of many similar stories. Real problems have been solved in open source software, and computing historians, vintage computer enthusiasts, researchers etc. can still benefit from that software long into the future. Throwing out all this stuff in the name of "progress", could be misguided. I'm especially sad when I see the glee which people have expressed when ditching libraries like Qt4 from the archive. Some software will not be ported on to Qt5 (or Gtk3, Qt6, Gtk4, Qt7, etc., in perpetuity). Such software might be all of: unmaintained, "finished", and useful for some purpose (however niche), all at the same time.

  • st, xft and ubuntu 20.04.1

    Some time ago I switched to AwesomeWM and with that came another change, my default terminal emulator. Having used GNOME terminal for years, I soon switched to Terminator back in the day. Leaving GNOME behind, in search for a more lean desktop with less frills and more keyboard centric features, I also had to ditch that terminal emulator (it has too many dependencies for my use case). Eventually I stumbled upon st, which fit the bill.

    st still seems almost perfect for me and I'm sticking with it, for now. There is one annoying bug though, which came to light when I started receiving e-mails with emoticons. Those emoticons crashed my 'st' instance!

    This is actually caused by an upstream Xft bug. When emoticons are displayed, they crash st. I had to resort to using xterm sometimes, which is, well, not a great experience nowadays. I set out on a journey to fix my desktop.

  • Design and Web team summary – 10th November 2020 | Ubuntu

    Hi, my name is Long. I’ve recently joined Canonical on the Web and Design team as a Lead Visual Designer. Joining Canonical during this weird time that we’re all going through has been a strange experience.

    I’m generally a sociable person who likes those impromptu conversations and chance meets in the office, but having to work remotely I haven’t had the opportunity to meet any of them in person. That being said; all the guys have made me feel extremely welcome and everybody’s passion and enthusiasm is infectious.

    My previous experience expands a wide range of sectors, which include Banking, Insurance, Retail, Sports and Media, Healthcare and lots of other fun projects along the way. I’ve been doing design in some form or another for the past 20 years and it never gets old. I’m always awed and fascinated by the design community who are always pushing the boundaries of design.

    Although very cliche, my hobbies include keeping up with design trends, Fashion, Architecture, Product Design and everything else in-between that catches my eye.

    If I’m not scouring the net for inspiration, I’ll be reading stuff about tech or chilling out with a good book (Fantasy, Sci-Fi).

  • Open Operators Training Day hosted by Canonical: a co-located KubeCon event

    KubeCon NA is just around the corner and, as always, we aim to give back to the community in any way we can. That’s why, in the context of the upcoming KubeCon, we’re hosting a full-day training on operators, led by Canonical’s engineers.

Compact box computer and signage system feature RK3399

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Android
Linux
Debian

Advantech’s compact “EPC-R4710” embedded computer and $303-and-up “DS-100” signage system run Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 2GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, up to 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and M.2 expansion.

Last week while exploring Advantech’s Rockchip RK3399 powered ROM-5780 SMARC module, we saw two RK3399 based Advantech computers marked as “new.” It is hard to see how new since we have seen no announcements or media coverage. (Advantech rarely announces its hardware products, saving its PR for major platform initiatives and strategic partnerships.) The EPC-R4710, which is also marked as “preliminary,” appears to be more recent than the DS-100, which is available from multiple sources selling for as low as $339 or $303 for the DS-100 Lite model.

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XuanTie C906 based Allwinner RISC-V processor to power $12+ Linux SBC’s

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Linux
Debian

Allwinner RISC-V processor will run the Debian Linux operating system (Tina OS), and the $12.5 price tag for Sipeed SBC makes it the cheapest RISC-V Linux board with MMU by far. You can already run Linux on RISC-V using Kendryte K210 boards, but those are not really practical due to the lack of MMU and low-memory, or on HiFive Unmatched offered for $665 and allows you to build a complete RISC-V PC.

The upcoming Allwinner powered RISC-V board from Sipeed does not come with a 3D GPU, and memory is limited so based on the information currently available, it may end being comparable to a Raspberry Pi Model A+ minus the ability to run any application relying on 3D graphics.

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Multi-touch Gestures in elementary OS 6

One of the most hotly requested features for years has been to have multi-touch gestures in elementary OS, and with 6.0 I’m excited to say that we will deliver. Like the dark style preference, delivering a great multi-touch experience is a little more complicated than it seems on the surface. There have been some 3rd party tools to detect touchpad gestures and then trigger actions after-the-fact, but it wasn’t until recently that we’ve had the technical ability to provide smooth, responsive animations that track 1:1 with your finger movement across a touchpad or touch screen. We’ve had the great pleasure of working with José Expósito, the author of Touchégg, on our window manager gestures. In elementary OS 6, we use Touchégg Daemon behind the scenes to capture input events and communicate them to Gala, our window manager. Read more Also: elementary OS 6 to get great looking multi-touch gestures

Watch Live TV on Linux With Hypnotix: A New IPTV Application Being Developed by Linux Mint Team

The rise of streaming services like Netflix made people speculate about the dim future of TV channels. While the newer generation might not watch TV anymore, TV channels are not out of fashion, yet. Many streaming services like Hulu and Hotstar include TV channels in their offering. TV channels are also utilizing live streaming to broadcast their content to viewers on the internet. Another way to watch live TV is by using IPTV. There are a number of TV channels available via IPTV so that viewers can use internet to watch the live broadcast. Some channels are available for free while some might require subscription. Read more

Best Linux distros for power users in 2020

The Linux power user is a celebrated breed, and one that does not simply burst fully-formed from the earth. All newbies must toil long and hard with their Linux installations before they can describe themselves as one. At the very least, the power user will have a great degree of skill concerning all things Linux, whether it's the kernel, Bash or package management systems – and they won’t be afraid to get their hands dirty in the name of configuring the system. Read more

Budgie 10.5.2 Desktop Environment Released with Support for the GNOME 3.38 Stack

More than a year in the works, Budgie 10.5.2 is here with a wide range of changes, starting with support for GNOME Project’s latest GNOME 3.38 stack. However, Budgie still supports the older GNOME 3.36 stack to make it easier for Linux OS maintainers to backport it to older operating systems. The biggest new feature in this release is the new desktop icons implementation called Budgie Desktop View. While an initial release, it already supports single (default) or double-click for launching items. However, future releases will bring drag and drop support, keyboard navigation, and GTK4 support. Read more