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Debian

RasPad 3 Review – Part 2: A Raspberry Pi 4 mini PC with integrated display

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Linux
Hardware
Debian

I started RasPad 3 review last week with an unboxing of the tablet shell for Raspberry Pi 4, together with assembly instructions, and a first boot after flashing Raspad OS to the system.

In the first part of the review, I mentioned that I’d probably focus the remainder of the review on Ezblock Studio visual programming IDE, as the rest of the software is almost the same as using a standard Raspberry Pi 4, the other difference being the touchscreen-friendly RasPad launcher.

But Sunfounder explained to me it would be hard to check out Ezblock as it’s designed to control robots and other hardware platforms, and requires an extra HAT (see Kickstarter campaign) to allow the Ezblock APP to connect through Bluetooth (it cannot be directly linked to Raspberry Pi through the built-in Bluetooth). Here’s an example of a robot that is compatible with Ezblock Studio: Picar-X.

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Debian GNU/Linux 10.10 “Buster” Released with 55 Security Updates and 81 Bug Fixes

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Coming less than three months after Debian GNU/Linux 10.9, the Debian GNU/Linux 10.10 update is here as up to date installation and live medium packed with all the latest security updates and bug fixes that have been released via the stable software repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster”.

Included in the Debian GNU/Linux 10.10 update, there’s a total of 136 updated packages, split in 55 security updates and 81 miscellaneous bug fixes. Of course, all these updates are already present in the Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” repositories for existing users.

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Debian 10.10 release 202106191548

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Debian

Late blogging on this one.

Even as we wait for the final release of Bullseye [Debian 11], we're still producing updates for Debian 10 [Buster].

Today has thrown up a few problems: working with Steve, RattusRattus and Isy in Cambridge, Schweer and Linux-Fan somewhere else in the world.

A couple of build problems have meant that we've started later than we otherwise might have been and a couple of image runs have had to be redone. We're there now and happily running tests.

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Debian: Bullseye and Reliability

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Debian
  • Dependable Debian is like a rock in a swirling gyre of 'move fast and break things', and version 11 is no different

    The Debian 11 is the venerable Debian Project's first new release in more than two years, nicknamed "Bullseye" after the Toy Story character and supplanting Debian 10 "Buster" (all Debian releases bear names from the kids' film).

    Since Debian is the source from which dozens of other distros draw, notably Ubuntu, its major updates are well worth paying attention to, even if you aren't a Debian user. If you are a Debian user and you've been patiently waiting for an updated kernel to work with all the latest hardware, I have good news, the 5.10 LTS Linux kernel is here. More on that in a minute.

    First, for the Linux newcomers, it might help to understand why Debian only releases new versions every couple of years when most popular distros crank out several new versions each year.

  • Debian 11 Bullseye: Full Freeze and Preliminary Release Dates have been set - Market Research Telecast

    The start date of Debian GNU / Linux 11 in the “Full Freeze” phase has been fixed since last weekend: From July 17, 2021, packages that now want to be included in the upcoming version of the Linux distribution require explicit approval (“manual unblock”) by the Debian release team. The full freeze is followed by the publication – and there is now a date for which the developers are aiming for July 31, 2021 as well.

    The Debian developers have July 17th rolled into one Post on the announcement mailing list debian-devel-announce announced. The appointment was also included in the Bullseye Freeze Timeline and Policy recorded, which depicts the total of four freeze phases. Last week, the team agreed on July 31, the cautiously targeted release date: A Mailing list post by developer Paul Gevers describes the date as a tentative release date, after possible dates in August had also been discussed.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Submit your ideas for Debian and +1 those that you find important

    A while ago, I got a request from Kentaro Hayashi on the project I use to manage funding requests addressed to Freexian. He was keen to see some improvements on the way reimbursement requests are handled in Debian. In my opinion, the idea is certainly good but he’s not part of the treasurer team and was not willing to implement the project either, so it was not really ready to be submitted to us.

    To be able to fund a useful project, we need either someone that is willing to do the work and try to push it further in Debian, or we need a Debian team interested in the result of the project (and in that case, we can try to find someone willing to implement the project). In this case, it’s a bit sad that the treasurer team didn’t comment at all… but in general, what should we do with those suggestions ?

Debian: Raphaël Hertzog (LTS Work), Jonathan Dowland (IkiWiki), and Ben Hutchings (Also LTS)

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  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, May 2021

    In May, we again put aside 2100 EUR to fund Debian projects. There was no proposals for new projects received, thus we’re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Please do not hesitate to submit a proposal, if there is a project that could benefit from the funding!

    We’re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Opinionated IkiWiki v1

    It's been more than a year since I wrote about Opinionated IkiWiki, a pre-configured, containerized deployment of Ikiwiki with opinions. My intention was to make something that is easy to get up and running if you are more experienced with containers than IkiWiki.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, May 2021

    In May I was assigned 13.5 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 4.5 hours from earlier months. I worked 16 hours and will carry over the remainder.

    I finished reviewing the futex code in the PREEMPT_RT patchset for Linux 4.9, and identified several places where it had been mis-merged with the recent futex security fixes. I sent a patch for these upstream, which was accepted and applied in v4.9.268-rt180.

Debian 11 "Bullseye" Installer RC2 Released

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Debian

The second release candidate of the Debian Installer for the upcoming 11.0 "Bullseye" release is now available for testing.

The Debian Installer Bullseye RC2 release shifts to the latest Linux 5.10 LTS kernel release point release, brings an updated mirror list, a fix for properly re-installing GRUB on BIOS systems, and a variety of other installer updates. This release candidate also works around an infinite loop within the GTK toolkit by making sure the requested width for the UI doesn't fall below 300px.

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Direct: Debian Installer Bullseye RC 2 release

Debian: FOSSHOST, Cinnamon, and BBB Packaging Team

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  • fabre.debian.net has moved to Debian.net Team Infrastructure。

    Today, fabre.debian.net has moved to Debian.net Team Infrastructure

    So far, fabre.debian.net was sponsored by FOSSHOST which provides us a VPS instance since Jan, 2021. It was located at OSU Open Source Lab. It worked pretty well, Thanks FOSSHOST sponsorship since ever!

  • Future of Cinnamon in Debian | There and back again

    OK, this is not an easy post. I have been maintaining Cinnamon in Debian for quite some time, since around the times version 4 came out. The soon (hahaha) to be released Bullseye will carry the last release of the 4-track, but version 5 is already waiting, After Bullseye, the future of Cinnamon in Debian currently looks bleak.

    Since my switch to KDE/Plasma, I haven’t used Cinnamon in months. Only occasionally I tested new releases, but never gave them a real-world test. Having left Gnome3 for it’s complete lack of usability for pro-users, I escaped to Cinnamon and found a good home there for quite some time – using modern technology but keeping user interface changes conservative. For long time I haven’t even contemplated using KDE, having been burned during the bad days of KDE3/4 when bloat-as-bloat-can-be was the best description.

  • Mike Gabriel: New Debian Packaging Team: BBB Packaging Team (and Kurento Media Server goes Debian)

    Today, Fre(i)e Software GmbH has been contracted for packaging Kurento Media Server for Debian. This packaging project will be funded by GUUG e.V. (the German Unix User Group e.V.). A big thanks to the people from GUUG e.V. for making this packaging project possible.

RasPad 3 Review – Part 1: Raspberry Pi 4 “tablet” specs, unboxing and assembly

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Linux
Hardware
Reviews
Debian

RasPad tablet kit for Raspberry Pi 3B+ and other SBC’s was introduced in 2018, but Sunfounder has recently introduced an update, RasPad 3 that supports the more powerful Raspberry Pi 4 SBC.

After seeing my review of CrowPi2 Raspberry Pi 4 education laptop, the company asked me whether I’d be interested in reviewing Raspad 3 as well. So here we are, and I’ve received a sample of the tablet kit.

As usual, I’ll do a two-part review, with unboxing and assembly of the kit. Since I previously missed the RasPad 3 announcement, I’ll start by listing some of the specifications.

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Debian: EasyOS Release, Collaborative Editing and Execution in Shared Byoby Sessions, Louis-Philippe Véronneau's New PC

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  • EasyOS Dunfell-series 2.8.1

    EasyOS was created in 2017, derived from Quirky Linux, which in turn was derived from Puppy Linux in 2013. Easy is built in woofQ, which takes as input binary packages from any distribution, and uses them on top of the unique EasyOS infrastructure.
    Throughout 2020, the official release for x86_64 PCs was the Buster-series, built with Debian 10.x Buster DEBs.
    EasyOS has also been built with packages compiled from source, using a fork of OpenEmbedded (OE). Currently, the Dunfell release of OE has been used, to compile two sets of binary packages, for x86_64 and aarch64.
    The latter have been used to build EasyOS for the Raspberry Pi4, and first official release, 2.6.1, was in January 2021.
    The page that you are reading now has the release notes for EasyOS Dunfell-series on x86_64 PCs, also debuting in 2021.
    To try and keep things simple, all three, the Dunfell-series on Pi4 and the Dunfell-series and Buster-series on the PC, all are (approximately) sync'ed at the same version number.

  • EasyOS Dunfell-series 2.8.1 released
  • Conf files for MPV and Celluloid

    Celluloid configuration, though, is a mystery. I think that it will automatically use the mpv conf files, though it is confusing as "Preferences..." shows the path to the conf files as "home". They can be changed to the appropriate files in ~/.config/mpv, though whether you really need to do this is not explained.
    It could be that the conf files in Celluloid are separate from the MPV ones, to specify extra settings, but that isn't explained anywhere.

  • SeaMonkey fix to display github.com correctly
  • Collaborative Editing and Execution in Shared Byoby Sessions

    The focus of this short video (and slides) is on collaboration using files, but also entire sessions, execution and all aspects of joint exploration, development or debugging. Anything you can do in a terminal you can also do shared in a terminal. The video contains a brief lightning talk, and a shared session jointly with Grant McDermott and Vicent Arel-Bundock. My big big thanks to both of them for prodding and encouragement, as well as fearless participation in the joint section of the video:

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: New Desktop Computer

    I built my last desktop computer what seems like ages ago. In 2011, I was in a very different place, both financially and as a person. At the time, I was earning minimum wage at my school's café to pay rent. Since the café was owned by the school cooperative, I had an employee discount on computer parts. This gave me a chance to build my first computer from spare parts at a reasonable price.

Debian: efivars, FreeTube, and More

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Best OCR Apps for Linux

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