Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

IKOULA hosts Raspberry Pi 4 “micro server” for 4.99+ Euros per month

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Hosting services for Arm single board computers where you pay a monthly fee for a board, and have it hosted in a datacenter with Internet access and easy provisioning have been around for over six years.

Last summer, we reported that Mythic Beasts and mini Nodes had added Raspberry Pi 4 hosting plans to their offerings, and others commented there were also other companies. But I’ve just been informed IKOULA, a hosting company based in France, had introduced Raspberry Pi 4 “micro server” hosting plans starting at just 4.99 Euros ex. VAT per month.

Read more

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2020

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 657

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 657 for the week of November 8 – 14, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Cybersecurity defenses for IIoT | Ubuntu

    Cybersecurity attacks on industrial IoT solutions can have detrimental consequences. This is the case because IoT devices record privacy-sensitive data and control production assets. Therefore, demonstrable trustworthiness is prerequisite to IoT adoption in industrial settings.

    Fortunately, IT security is a mature field. Experts have identified classes of threats devices may be subject to. Let’s discuss these threat patterns and mitigation strategies in the IIoT context.

This Is the Default Theme of Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

Filed under
Debian

The winner is Juliette Taka and her artwork “Homeworld” will be used as the default theme for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye,” the next major version of the popular Linux-based operating system. The artwork will be used as default wallpaper, login screen, installer, etc.

Juliette Taka works at Logilab and she’s using Debian GNU/Linux for more than seven years. She is known for making illustrations and drawing comics books, and she also made the Lines theme used in Debian GNU/Linux 8 “Jessie” and the softWaves theme used in Debian GNU/Linux 9 “Stretch.”

Read more

"Homeworld" will be the default theme for Debian 11

Filed under
Debian

The theme "Homeworld" by Juliette Taka has been selected as default theme for Debian 11 'bullseye'. Juliette says that this theme has been inspired by the Bauhaus movement, an art style born in Germany in the 20th century.

After the Debian Desktop Team made the call for proposing themes, a total of eighteen choices have been submitted. The desktop artwork poll was open to the public, and we received 5,613 responses ranking the different choices, of which Homeworld has been ranked as the winner among them.

This is the third time that a submission by Juliette has won. Juliette is also the author of the lines theme that was used in Debian 8 and the softWaves theme that was used in Debian 9.

Read more

Debian: Kubernetes, Reproducible Builds, and More

Filed under
Debian
  • Packaging Kubernetes for Debian [LWN.net]

    Linux distributors are in the business of integrating software from multiple sources, packaging the result, and making it available to their users. It has long been true that some projects are easier to package than others. The Debian technical committee (TC) is currently being asked to make a decision in a dispute over how an especially hard-to-package project — Kubernetes — should be handled. Regardless of the eventual outcome, this disagreement clearly shows how the packaging model used by Linux distributors is increasingly mismatched to how software is often developed in the 2020s; what should replace that model is rather less clear, though.
    A longstanding rule followed by most distributors is that there should be only one copy of any given library (or other dependency) in the system, and that said copy should usually be in its own package. To do otherwise would bloat the system and complicate the task of keeping things secure. As an extreme example, consider what would happen if every program carried its own copy of the C library in its package. Those thousands of copies would consume vast amounts of both storage space and memory. If a security vulnerability were found in that library, thousands of packages would have to be updated to fix it everywhere. A single library package shared by all users, instead, is more efficient and far easier to maintain.

    This rule is thus contrary to the practice of stuffing dependent libraries into the package of a program that needs them — a practice often called "vendoring". Living up to this rule can be challenging, though, with many modern projects, which also often engage in a fair amount of vendoring. Projects written in certain languages appear to be especially prone to this sort of behavior; the Go language, for example, seems to encourage vendoring.

    Kubernetes is written in Go, and it carries a long list of dependencies with it. It was maintained in Debian for a while by Dmitry Smirnov, but he orphaned Kubernetes in 2018, stating that packaging it is "a full time job, probably for more than one person". The Kubernetes package was eventually picked up by Janos Lenart, who has been supplying updated versions to the Debian Testing repository.

  • Reproducible Builds in October 2020 — reproducible-builds.org

    In our monthly reports, we outline the major things that we have been up to over the past month. As a brief reminder, the motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure flaws have not been introduced in the binaries we install on our systems. If you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.

    [...]

    During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh in 2019, developers from the GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian distributions were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical GNU Mes binary despite using three different versions of GCC. Since this summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc, and last month a fuller update was posted to this effect by the individuals involved. This month, however, David Wheeler updated his extensive page on Fully Countering Trusting Trust through Diverse Double-Compiling, remarking that...

    [...]

    Build node maintenance was performed by both Holger Levsen […][…] and Vagrant Cascadian […][…][…], Vagrant Cascadian also updated the page listing the variations made when testing to reflect changes for in build paths […] and Hans-Christoph Steiner made a number of changes for F-Droid, the free software app repository for Android devices, including...

  • My Debian Activities in October 2020 – blog.alteholz.eu

    This month I accepted 208 packages and rejected 29. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 563, so yeah, I was not alone this month Smile.

    Anyway, this month marked another milestone in my NEW package handling. My overall number of ACCEPTed package exceeded the magic number of 20000 packages. This is almost 30% of all packages accepted in Debian. I am a bit proud of this achievement.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • jmtd → log → Borg, confidence in backups, GtkPod and software preservation

    Luckily, other fine folks have worked out reversing all these steps and implemented it in software such as libgpod and its frontend, GtkPod, which is still currently available as a Debian package. It mostly worked, and I got back 95% of the tracks. (It would have been nice if GtkPod had reported the tracks it hadn't recovered, it was aware they existed based on the errors it did print. But you can't have everything.)

    GtkPod is a quirky, erratic piece of software, that is only useful for old Apple equipment that is long out of production, prior to the introduction of the encryption. The upstream homepage is dead, and I suspect it is unmaintained. The Debian package is orphaned. It's been removed from testing, because it won't build with GCC 10. On the other hand, my experience shows that it worked, and was useful for a real problem that someone had today.

    I'm in two minds about GtkPod's fate. On the one hand, I think Debian has far too many packages, with a corresponding burden of maintenance responsibility (for the whole project, not just the individual package maintainers), and there's a quality problem: once upon a time, if software had been packaged in a distribution like Debian, that was a mark of quality, a vote of confidence, and you could have some hope that the software would work and integrate well with the rest of the system. That is no longer true, and hasn't been in my experience for many years. If we were more discerning about what software we included in the distribution, and what we kept, perhaps we could be a leaner distribution, faster to adapt to the changing needs in the world, and of a higher quality.

    On the other hand, this story about GtkPod is just one of many similar stories. Real problems have been solved in open source software, and computing historians, vintage computer enthusiasts, researchers etc. can still benefit from that software long into the future. Throwing out all this stuff in the name of "progress", could be misguided. I'm especially sad when I see the glee which people have expressed when ditching libraries like Qt4 from the archive. Some software will not be ported on to Qt5 (or Gtk3, Qt6, Gtk4, Qt7, etc., in perpetuity). Such software might be all of: unmaintained, "finished", and useful for some purpose (however niche), all at the same time.

  • st, xft and ubuntu 20.04.1

    Some time ago I switched to AwesomeWM and with that came another change, my default terminal emulator. Having used GNOME terminal for years, I soon switched to Terminator back in the day. Leaving GNOME behind, in search for a more lean desktop with less frills and more keyboard centric features, I also had to ditch that terminal emulator (it has too many dependencies for my use case). Eventually I stumbled upon st, which fit the bill.

    st still seems almost perfect for me and I'm sticking with it, for now. There is one annoying bug though, which came to light when I started receiving e-mails with emoticons. Those emoticons crashed my 'st' instance!

    This is actually caused by an upstream Xft bug. When emoticons are displayed, they crash st. I had to resort to using xterm sometimes, which is, well, not a great experience nowadays. I set out on a journey to fix my desktop.

  • Design and Web team summary – 10th November 2020 | Ubuntu

    Hi, my name is Long. I’ve recently joined Canonical on the Web and Design team as a Lead Visual Designer. Joining Canonical during this weird time that we’re all going through has been a strange experience.

    I’m generally a sociable person who likes those impromptu conversations and chance meets in the office, but having to work remotely I haven’t had the opportunity to meet any of them in person. That being said; all the guys have made me feel extremely welcome and everybody’s passion and enthusiasm is infectious.

    My previous experience expands a wide range of sectors, which include Banking, Insurance, Retail, Sports and Media, Healthcare and lots of other fun projects along the way. I’ve been doing design in some form or another for the past 20 years and it never gets old. I’m always awed and fascinated by the design community who are always pushing the boundaries of design.

    Although very cliche, my hobbies include keeping up with design trends, Fashion, Architecture, Product Design and everything else in-between that catches my eye.

    If I’m not scouring the net for inspiration, I’ll be reading stuff about tech or chilling out with a good book (Fantasy, Sci-Fi).

  • Open Operators Training Day hosted by Canonical: a co-located KubeCon event

    KubeCon NA is just around the corner and, as always, we aim to give back to the community in any way we can. That’s why, in the context of the upcoming KubeCon, we’re hosting a full-day training on operators, led by Canonical’s engineers.

Compact box computer and signage system feature RK3399

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian

Advantech’s compact “EPC-R4710” embedded computer and $303-and-up “DS-100” signage system run Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 2GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, up to 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and M.2 expansion.

Last week while exploring Advantech’s Rockchip RK3399 powered ROM-5780 SMARC module, we saw two RK3399 based Advantech computers marked as “new.” It is hard to see how new since we have seen no announcements or media coverage. (Advantech rarely announces its hardware products, saving its PR for major platform initiatives and strategic partnerships.) The EPC-R4710, which is also marked as “preliminary,” appears to be more recent than the DS-100, which is available from multiple sources selling for as low as $339 or $303 for the DS-100 Lite model.

Read more

XuanTie C906 based Allwinner RISC-V processor to power $12+ Linux SBC’s

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Allwinner RISC-V processor will run the Debian Linux operating system (Tina OS), and the $12.5 price tag for Sipeed SBC makes it the cheapest RISC-V Linux board with MMU by far. You can already run Linux on RISC-V using Kendryte K210 boards, but those are not really practical due to the lack of MMU and low-memory, or on HiFive Unmatched offered for $665 and allows you to build a complete RISC-V PC.

The upcoming Allwinner powered RISC-V board from Sipeed does not come with a 3D GPU, and memory is limited so based on the information currently available, it may end being comparable to a Raspberry Pi Model A+ minus the ability to run any application relying on 3D graphics.

Read more

Debian/Ubuntu: "Already in Debian", LazPaint in Sparky Linux, and Ubuntu in MTS/Russia

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • debexpo: adding "Already in Debian" field for packages list - ひとりしずかに。

    I've sent a merge request to show "Already in Debian" column in packages list on mentors.debian.net.

    [...]

    This feature is not fully merged yet, but it may be useful to distinguish "This package is already in Debian or not" for sponsor.

  • LazPaint

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: LazPaint

    [...]

    LazPaint was started to demonstrate the capabilities of the graphic library BGRABitmap. It provides advanced drawing functions in Lazarus development environment. Both provided a source of inspiration for the other and finally LazPaint became real image editor. Thanks to the help of Lazarus community, the program has been compiled on Windows, Linux and macOS.

  • Canonical to Work with Major Telecom Company

    While talking about cloud-based business, nothing is as wide-spread and influential as telecommunications companies. Because of software-defined networking (SDN) and Network functions virtualization (NVF), telecom services are completely run on the cloud. Canonica, best known for its Linux-based OS Ubuntu, has won a significant customer for its Charmed OpenStack cloud software. The customer is none other than MTS, the largest telecom company in Russia.

Debian 11 "Bullseye" Freezes Coming Up, Debian 13 To Be Trixie

Filed under
Debian

Debian developers are two months out from the transition and essentials freeze for Debian 11 "Bullseye" that in turn should debut as stable later in 2021.

Starting on 12 January 2021 is the transition and essentials freeze for the Debian 11 "Bullseye" release. After that Debian maintainers should avoid large/disruptive changes. The soft freeze should then begin on 12 February and the hard freeze on 12 March. The full freeze and actual release of Debian 11.0 have yet to be determined.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Ken Hess (Red Hat): Cyber Week 2020: 13 ideas for what to buy the sysadmin in your life | Enable Sysadmin

    It's that special time of year when you can get great discounts on tech for your favorite sysadmin.

  • [IBM Emeritus] Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Are There Limits to the Predictability of Elections?

    The elegant mathematical models of classical mechanics depict a world in which objects exhibit deterministic behaviors. These models make perfect predictions within the accuracy of their human-scale measurements. But, once you start dealing with atoms, molecules and exotic subatomic particles, you find yourself in a very different world, one with somewhat counter-intuitive behaviors governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. The orderly, predictable models of classical physics have now given way to wave functions, uncertainty principles, quantum tunneling and wave-particle dualities. But, the world of the very small is not the only one with non-deterministic behaviors. So are highly complex systems, especially those systems whose components and interrelationships are themselves quite complex. This is the case with social systems, which are based on individuals, groups, and institutions. It’s quite a challenge to make accurate predictions in such systems due to the the dynamic nature of human behaviors. Terms, like emergence, long tails, and butterfly effects - every bit as fanciful as quarks, charm and strangeness, - are part of the social systems lexicon. Which brings us to the 2020 US election. “The polls were wrong again, and much of America wants to know why,” wrote NY Times journalist David Leonhardt in a recent article. “This is a disaster for the polling industry and for media outlets and analysts that package and interpret the polls for public consumption, such as FiveThirtyEight, The New York Times’ Upshot, and The Economist’s election unit,” said David Graham in The Atlantic.

  • [Red Hat] Why failure should be normalized and how to do it | Opensource.com

    All of your heroes have failures under their belts—from minor mistakes to major disasters. Nobody knows how to do everything automatically, and the process of learning is usually a messy one. So why is the perception that everyone but you knows what they’re doing so common? Why do we externalize our successes but internalize our failures? How does it make you feel when you struggle to learn something new, then see another person take their Jira card away and return at the end of the sprint with something fully fleshed out and working, gushing about it at the demo? Sure, you closed your card too, but it was really hard! There was a new algorithm, a new programming language, a new system all to be learned. How did she make it look so effortless? The truth is, she might have struggled with the same issues you did and wondered how you made it look so effortless! [...] It could be very easy to title this section "my mistakes" and then rattle off all the times I’ve made mistakes, but that doesn’t quite illustrate the point. I recognize these mistakes, but they’re also events that expanded the understanding of my craft. While I didn’t set out to intentionally do any of these things, I certainly learned from them. I have accidentally dropped (deleted) a customer’s database. It was lucky for everyone that it was a beta-phase database and no further harm was done. I learned a valuable lesson that day: be very watchful of what code is doing, and be careful about what environment you are working in. One day, while performing routine maintenance with an odd DNS setup, I accidentally broke the ability for customers to provide credit card information to the secure site. We had two "payments" DNS records that served to override a wildcard DNS record, and I assumed that the second "payments" record was still present. It wasn’t. And then the wildcard record took over, and the DNS started behaving like "payments" wasn’t special at all anymore. Of course, I had no idea this was happening at all—it wasn’t until my maintenance was over that I learned of the folly. Customers weren’t able to provide payment information for almost two hours! I learned my lesson, though: when there is something special about a particular configuration, be sure to make sure it stays special throughout its lifetime. When DNS gets involved, all kinds of things can break.

today's howtos

  • What option to use for ping constantly until you stop it? - Linux Shout

    The Ping program is a widely used tool to check the accessibility of a computer network. All operating systems available till now have the ability to run the Ping command with various options to even continuously check the network resource or connection availability. However, if a firewall suppresses ping packets on the way from your computer to the host, it can falsely appear to be unreachable. To do this, it sends echo request packets to the host via ICMP. Using the time difference between this and the response (echo reply), it calculates the runtime. Ping was defined in RFC 1574.

  • How to Cast Media from Ubuntu to Chromecast | FOSS Linux

    In this Ubuntu tutorial, we shall see ways to cast media from a Linux PC to a Chromecast device. We shall see command-line and GUI ways of casting the content.

  • How do I view Nginx logs? – Linux Hint

    Logs are very important in a system to monitor the activities of an application as they provide you with useful debugging information and enable you to analyze all aspects of a web server. Like the other software applications, Nginx also maintains events like your web site visitors, encountered problems, and more to log files. The useful recorded information is used to take preemptive measures in order to deal with major serious discrepancies in the log events. In this article, we will elaborate on how to configure and view Nginx Logs in Ubuntu 20.04 system to monitor the application activities. There are two types of logs where recorded events in Nginx one is the access log, and the other is the error log. If you have already enabled these logs in the Nginx core configuration file then, you can find both types of logs in /var/log/nginx in all Linux distributions.

  • How To Install PowerShell on CentOS 8 [Ed: Microsoft is just trying to turn GNU/Linux into its own thing, intended to serve Microsoft's bottom line and lock-in]
  • OSINT Tools and Techniques – Linux Hint

    OSINT, or Open Source Intelligence, is the act of gathering data from distributed and freely accessible sources. OSINT tools are used to gather and correspond data from the Web. Data is accessible in different structures, including text design, documents, images, etc. The analysis and collection of information from the Internet or other publicly available sources is known as OSINT or Open Source Intelligence. This is a technique used by intelligence and security companies to gather information. This article provides a look at some of the most useful OSINT tools and techniques.

  • How to Record Your Gnome Desktop in Ubuntu with built-in screen recorder – Linux Hint

    In the present era, the lives of the people have undergone a huge change from what it used to be a couple of years back. In the educational sector, books have fallen down the pecking order, and people now prefer watching videos explaining the concepts of their syllabus. A great example of this is YouTube, where videos on things like programming languages, economics, political science, and even geography are getting many viewers. The business sector has also gone through some innovation as now people can easily keep a record of important voice calls and conferences that might be needed for looking at the main highlights of the meeting. Even recording presentations and then sharing them with your clients or bosses have become the norm as this allows information to be passed from one to another in a much more efficient manner. All of these are just a few examples of why screen recorders are one of the most useful tools out there. Screen recorders can even be used for recording content that many people may find enjoyable, such as recording a game that might be on the rise in popularity or put up videos to explain any issues or problems that you might come across in your life, like checking to see how one can remove and adjust tires from a car. Hence, our discussion topic in this article is to look at how one can record their screens in Ubuntu using its default built-in screen recorder.

  • Blender Animation Nodes – Linux Hint

    Blender animation nodes is a visual scripting system made for motion graphics in Blender. Animation nodes are an addon that is available for macOS, Linux, and Windows. There are a lot of things which you just can imagine to animate by hand because it is a very difficult task. Animation Nodes allows us to make complex animation in a less complex and tedious way. Animation Nodes add-ons can save you a lot of time and has several advantages over traditional keyframing technique. For instance, you can avoid managing many keyframes, and each node tree can be used for any objects; you don’t have to keyframe them every time.

  • Blender Animation Loops – Linux Hint

    Blender is a powerful 3D creation tool. Blender holds all the attributes that a 3D artist needs. Sometimes a short movie tells a lot than an image. Making 3D scenes in Blender is great, but animating it is another level of mastering this program. So, it is essential to know about adding motion to 3D objects. Animation is an excellent way to connect and communicate with people; that’s why it is vital in the business world. Conveying a message through animation is considerably more appealing than images. Whether it is education or businesses, the film industry, or gaming, animation is being used everywhere.

Best Photo Editors for Linux

This article will cover a list of free and open-source image editors available for Linux. These applications feature basic tools for simple editing needs as well as advanced utilities for professional artists. GIMP If you are a regular Linux user, chances are that you must have heard about GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) or used it to edit images. It is considered to be one of the most comprehensive, free, and open source image editing software available not only on Linux, but also on other operating systems like Windows and macOS. While some users may prefer proprietary tools like Photoshop over it, GIMP itself is packed with tons of features and can do almost everything that Photoshop is capable of. You can see all major features of GIMP available at here and here. GIMP can be extended using plugins, some of them come with the official installation while others can be downloaded from third party websites. [...] RawTherapee RawTherapee is an open source image editing software specially designed for processing and handling “raw” images. You can also import and edit image files having other formats. RawTherapee features various utilities for processing raw images including color enhancement tools, compositing and masking utilities, pixel correction tools and HDR utilities. Read more