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Red Hat

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • OpenShift Commons Gathering in Milan 2019 – Recap [Slides]

    On September 18th, 2019, the first OpenShift Commons Gathering Milan brought together over 300 experts to discuss container technologies, operators, the operator framework and the open source software projects that support the OpenShift ecosystem. This was the first OpenShift Commons Gathering to take place in Italy.

    The standing room only event hosted 11 talks in a whirlwind day of discussions. Of particular interest to the community was Christian Glombek’s presentation updating the status and roadmap for OKD4 and CoreOS.

    Highlights from the Gathering induled an OpenShift 4 Roadmap Update, customer stories from Amadeus, the leading travel technology company, and local stories from Poste Italiane and SIA S.p.A. In addition to the technical updates and customer talks, there was plenty of time to network during the breaks and enjoy the famous Italian coffee.

  • Powering the hybrid cloud on next-generation hardware: Red Hat Enterprise Linux on IBM System Z and LinuxONE

    For more than five years we have been driving our technology strategy around the idea that the future of enterprise IT does not reside solely in an enterprise datacenter or in the public cloud. Instead the next wave of computing is built on a blend of these technologies and infrastructure: in short, the future is hybrid. The value of hybrid clouds comes from the choice it delivers, pairing the control of the corporate datacenter alongside the scale and flexibility of public clouds. We strongly feel, however, that the most valuable hybrid clouds are those that offer not only a choice of deployment type and location, but also a choice of the underlying architecture and the capacity to run on multiple public clouds.

    [....]

    With RHEL available on Z15 and LinuxONE III, this helps pave the way for the rest of Red Hat’s hybrid cloud portfolio, including Red Hat OpenShift, to emerge on IBM enterprise platforms. We’re pleased to continue our work with IBM in bringing the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform to their next-generation systems.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Marks End of Short-Term Support

    Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 is the last release that will only be supported for a year, as the company moves to a new model to support the open-source cloud platform.

  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2019/07

Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

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Red Hat
Server
  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context!

    Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”?

    Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks.

    According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.

Fedora: rpminspect, Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day, Cockpit 203 and More

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Red Hat
  • rpminspect-0.6 released with new inspections and bug fixes

    This release also includes a lot of bug fixes. I really appreciate all of the feedback users have been providing. It is really helping round out the different inspections and ensure it works across all types of builds.

    For details on what is new in rpminspect-0.6, see the release page.

  • Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day 2019-09-23

    Monday 2019-09-23, is the Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day! As part of preparing for the final release of Fedora 31, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 203

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 203.

  • Attention: Fedora Yahoo Email Users

    Going from a blast of the past we are currently going through one of the Yahoo is not allowing many emails with either fedoraproject.org OR from our mail routers. It would seem that the way to get yahoo to blacklist a domain is to get subscribed to mailing lists and then report the lists as SPAM. Enough accounts (or maybe if one person does it enough times).. yahoo will helpfully blacklist the domain completely. [It then is usually a multi-month process of people explaining that no Fedora is not a spam site, hasn't been taken over by a spam site, or a bunch of other things which do happen so any mail admin is going to be wary on.]

Red Hat/IBM Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • DevNation Live Bengaluru: Java microservices and how to become cloud-native

    Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

    Many of us are on a journey from traditional monolithic applications to a more distributed cloud-native microservices architecture. In this session, Burr Sutter discusses the key microservices architecture principles and explains how and why to evolve to this approach. You’ll learn how to become a new cloud-native developer and architect.

  • Red Hat UK ranked fourth in Best Workplaces In Tech 2019

    At Red Hat we love to celebrate our people and culture, and it is with great pleasure that we can share that Red Hat in the United Kingdom has been honoured in the Great Place to Work awards, ranking fourth in the UK's Best Workplaces in Tech 2019, large company category.

    Great Place to Work identifies thriving successful workplaces through a rigorous methodology that includes its Trust Index survey, which looks at the employee experience, and its Culture Audit, which assesses leadership and people practices. Red Hat reached the number four spot thanks to its passion to deliver a great employee experience and to enable a more innovative and productive environment for all. Great Place to Work recognises Red Hat UK as somewhere employees trust the people they work for, have pride in the work they do and enjoy the people they work with.

  • Custom Grafana dashboards for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4

    OpenShift administrators often face the same challenges as other system administrators: "I need a tool that will monitor the health of my system." Yet, traditional monitoring tools often fall short in their visibility of an OpenShift cluster. Thus, a typical OpenShift monitoring stack includes Prometheus for systems as well as service monitoring, and Grafana for analyzing and visualizing metrics.

    Often, administrators are looking to write custom queries and create custom dashboards in Grafana. However, the Grafana instance that is provided with the monitoring stack, along with its dashboards, is read-only. Enter the community-powered Grafana operator provided by OperatorHub.

  • IBM will soon launch a 53-qubit quantum computer

    IBM continues to push its quantum computing efforts forward and today announced that it will soon make a 53-qubit quantum computer available to clients of its IBM Q Network. The new system, which is scheduled to go online in the middle of next month, will be the largest universal quantum computer available for external use yet.

    The new machine will be part of IBM’s new Quantum Computation Center in New York State, which the company also announced today. The new center, which is essentially a data center for IBM’s quantum machines, will also feature five 20-qubit machines, but that number will grow to 14 within the next month. IBM promises a 95% service availability for its quantum machines.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS 6 Receive Important Kernel Security Update

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Red Hat

Marked by the Red Hat Product Security team as having a security impact of "Important," the new Linux kernel security update is here to patch a memory corruption (CVE-2018-9568) that occurred due to incorrect socket cloning and a NULL pointer dereference (CVE-2019-11810) discovered in drivers/scsi/megaraid/megaraid_sas_base.c, which could lead to a denial of service.

Also fixed in this update are two bugs affecting the performance of the Linux kernel on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 systems, namely a fragmented packets timing out issue and the backport TCP follow-up for small buffers. These two bugs can be corrected if you install the new kernel versions for your operating system.

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Announcing Kanidm - A new IDM project

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Red Hat

Today I’m starting to talk about my new project - Kanidm. Kanidm is an IDM project designed to be correct, simple and scalable. As an IDM project we should be able to store the identities and groups of people, authenticate them securely to various other infrastructure components and services, and much more.

You can find the source for kanidm on github.

For more details about what the project is planning to achieve, and what we have already implemented please see the github.

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[CentOS-announce] Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1908) on the x86_64 Architecture

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Linux
Red Hat

Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1908) on the x86_64 Architecture

We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7
(1908) for the x86_64 architecture. Effectively immediately, this
is the current release for CentOS Linux 7 and is tagged as 1908, derived
from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 Source Code.

As always, read through the Release Notes at :
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS7 - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
the users.

Read more

Also: CentOS 7.7 Released As The Last Stop Before CentOS 8.0

Announcing the release of Fedora 31 Beta

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 31 Beta, the next step towards our planned Fedora 31 release at the end of October.

The newest release of the GNOME desktop environment is full of performance enhancements and improvements. The beta ships with a prerelease, and the full 3.34 release will be available as an update. For a full list of GNOME 3.34 highlights, see the release notes.

Read more

Also: Fedora 31 Beta Released With GNOME 3.34, Guts i686 Hardware Support

CentOS 8 To Be Released Next Week

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

The CentOS Project has announced that CentOS 8.0 will be available for download beginning Tuesday, September 24. This release was deferred so that work to release CentOS 7.7 could be completed, which means that CentOS 7.7 will be out shortly as well (and 7.7 it is already beginning to appear in mirrors and repos). This comes 20 weeks to the day from the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

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Fedora: GSoC, Fedora Program Management, PHP, Fedora Infrastructure, Test Day and EPEL

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: GSoC summer 2019: Fedora Gooey Karma

    The day GSoC projects list was published I started sorting out all the organizations that I’d enjoy working with. Being a Linux user/enthusiast I filtered down to a bunch of Linux distros and desktop managers. Sorting out all the projects, Fedora-Gooey-Karma seemed to be a project that suited the skills I have.

    Once I was sure that Fedora Gooey Karma is a project that I would love to work on during the summer, I mailed @sumantro about the project. We talked about the project on mails.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-37

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 Beta is go!

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • PHP version 7.2.23RC1 and 7.3.10RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.10RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.23RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Karsten Hopp: Onboarding Fedora Infrastructure

    I'm using / working on Fedora since FC-1 and just recently joined the Infrastructure team.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora 31 Gnome Test Day 2019-09-18

    Wednesday, 2019-09-18 is the Fedora 31 Gnome Test Day! As part of changes Gnome 3.34 in Fedora 31, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • EPEL Bug: Bash errors on recent EL-8 systems.

    Last week, I got asked about a problem with using EPEL-8 on Oracle Enterprise Linux 8 where trying to install packages failed due to bad license file. I duplicated the problem on RHEL-8 which had not happened before some recent updates.

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Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more