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Red Hat

Red Hat/IBM Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Pushes the Edge Further with Updates to Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes

    Red Hat Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.9 and Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.4, both designed to drive consistency of the open hybrid cloud to the furthest reaches of the enterprise network. The new capabilities, which include the general availability of single node OpenShift for the small, full featured enterprise Kubernetes cluster, help organizations scale existing development, deployment and management workflows to meet increased interest in information and services.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16.2 Now Generally Available

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16.2, the latest version of its highly-scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform. Designed to help organizations succeed in a hybrid cloud world, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16.2 delivers tighter integration with Red Hat OpenShift, so customers can run both new and traditional applications in parallel with improved network capacity, security features, storage, performance and efficiency.

  • Red Hat Enhances Developer Experience on OpenShift with Latest Portfolio Updates

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs aimed at delivering greater productivity, security and scale for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform. With updates to tools like Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps and the Red Hat build of Quarkus — as well as an expanding roster of training resources available on Kube By Example — Kubernetes developers can more easily build, automate and deploy cloud-native applications for hybrid multicloud environments.

  • Red Hat OpenShift, ACM Updates Flex Kubernetes at the Edge

    Red Hat announced updated versions of its Kubernetes-focused OpenShift and Advanced Cluster Management (ACM) platforms, highlighting the vendor’s focus on providing organizations with more flexibility in managing their container-based infrastructure in edge locations.

    OpenShift 4.9 now supports a single-node architecture targeted at edge environments. This option combines worker and control capabilities into one server, which reduces the need to rely on a centralized Kubernetes control plane and addresses the challenge of space-constrained environments with a smaller deployment footprint.

    OpenShift continues to offer support for 3-node clusters and remote worker nodes.

  • My 5 favorite Linux container images | Enable Sysadmin

    When you start using containers in earnest, you quickly realize that there are many container images out there. One of open source's greatest strengths is choice, and with so many images available, you have plenty of options when you need an image to base your work upon. I find myself going back to the same few images pretty frequently. There are five in particular that consistently make me a happy fledgling cloud architect.

  • [Former IBM executive] The Supply Chain Economy - A New Categorization of the US Economy

    A few weeks ago I attended The Supply Chain Economy: Understanding Innovation in Services, a virtual seminar sponsored by the Council on Foreign Relations with economists Mercedes Delgado and Karen Mills discussing their recent paper A New Categorization of the U.S. Economy.

    The debate about the drivers of innovation and job creation has long been centered on manufacturing versus services. The predominant view has been that manufacturing drives good wages, economic growth, and innovation as measured by its large share of patents, while services provide lower-wage jobs, less innovation and significantly fewer patents.

    But Delgado and Mills argue that categorizing the economy in terms of manufacturing versus services is no longer meaningful. Instead, they’ve proposed an alternative framework for understanding the drivers of innovation and economic performance that’s focused on the suppliers of both goods and services: the supply chain economy.

    “A long academic and policy debate has focused on the role of the manufacturing capacity of a country in its economic and innovative performance,” wrote the authors. “This question has become even more relevant as the U.S. economy has shown a large decline in manufacturing employment in recent decades, in part due to increased import competition. In this debate, the predominant view is that a country's manufacturing capacity drives innovation because of externalities associated with the production of intermediate goods (e.g., machine tools, automation equipment, and semiconductors) that improve the efficiency of the innovation process. Most prior work on innovation focused on a narrow view of suppliers as producers of intermediate goods. However, in today's economy suppliers increasingly produce services (e.g., enterprise software).”

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Reach your open source community with content marketing [Ed: IBM has totally lost direction; this is how they think of Free software...]

    Both startups and more established firms are increasingly turning to content marketing as a way of reaching prospective customers.

    However, corporate marketers often consider the open source software (OSS) community a challenge to reach. This article features ways your technology and content marketing teams can work together to target and reach the community around an OSS project your organization supports.

  • Why digital transformation demands a change in leadership mindset

    Recently a key retail executive forecast that their industry will change more in the next five years than it has in the past fifty. Another executive believes society will change more in the next fifty years than it has in the last three hundred. A recent headline declared that, “We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history”, and Ray Kurzweil, Google’s Director of Engineering and co-Founder of Singularity University, has said that there will be fourteen internet size revolutions in the next decade. Whichever way you look at it, things are shifting… fast.

    When you speak with the visionaries and entrepreneurs actually building the solutions of tomorrow, from on-demand retail to vertical farms, and ask how far into this new era we are, almost universally the reply is: “only one percent”. Imagine then, where we will be ten years from now? How about 50?

    Major industries, from medicine to energy to travel to entertainment, are radically transforming, putting pressure on others such as manufacturing, construction, transportation, finance, education…frankly, all of it. What an extraordinary opportunity this presents.

  • DevSecOps lessons learned during a pandemic | The Enterprisers Project

    As we’ve seen over the past year and a half, the pandemic has accelerated digital transformation and forever changed workplace culture. Increased reliance on digital tools has elevated the value of DevSecOps, as enterprises of all sizes and across all industries realize the importance of automating and integrating security at every phase of the software development lifecycle – from initial design through integration, testing, deployment, and product delivery.

    My engineering team was no exception to this shift – we had to quickly prepare to build a new Virtana SaaS platform and deliver several new modules, all while working remotely.

    Here I’ll share some observations, pain points, and lessons learned to help others intelligently embrace DevSecOps best practices within their teams.

A new conceptual model for Fedora

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Red Hat

It’s no news now that Fedora has a new logo, and what you may not realize is that we do not have a new website – when we began the new logo rollout process, we simply updated the logo in-place on our pre-existing website.

The thing is – and this is regardless of the underlying code or framework under-girding the website, which I have no issues with – the messaging and content on the current getfedora.org website has not kept pace with the developments, goals, and general narrative of the Fedora project. We have a lot of different initiatives, developments, and collaborations happening at what I find at times is a dizzying pace that is challenging to keep up with. The number of different fronts that Fedora development takes place on and the low, technical level they occur at makes it difficult to understand the big picture of what exactly Fedora is, and why and how would one want to use it.

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My Fedora Linux home network part 1 – the data server

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Red Hat

The following article is the first of a series about how I’ve used the Fedora Linux operating system to create a home network. My goal is to demonstrate a few ways that Fedora Linux can be useful to a home user or a Small Office / Home Office (SOHO) user and to encourage more people to test, implement and use Fedora Linux. There is also demand in the workforce for Information Technology (IT) professionals who are ready to step into duties that require familiarity with Linux. With Linux, you can start without big investments. You can use what equipment you have and grow with your ideas.

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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Shares ― Special edition: Red Hat Summit 2021 Virtual Experience recap

    After a successful first run as a virtual event last year, Red Hat Summit Virtual Experience garnered more than 43,712* session views globally in 2021. Spread out over a couple of two-day events in April and June, this year’s Summit was all about offering attendees a way to "open your perspective."

    The two-part event included 177 keynotes, breakouts, demos, and featured sessions, and 76 "Ask the Experts" sessions—all of which are available on demand for one year after their air dates. We also had five special guests—actors Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Kumail Nanjiani, musicians Ben Folds and Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, and philanthropist Mick Ebeling—the Open Source Arcade, the #RHSummit photo maker, the "Code is open" challenge, the Open Neighborhood digital expo hall, and lots of news. And it wouldn’t be Red Hat Summit without a ton of Red Hat swag available from the Cool Stuff Store.

    In this special edition of Red Hat Shares, check out highlights from the virtual event, including featured keynotes, the top 10 sessions, our Red Hat Innovation Awards winners, and more.

  • AlmaLinux Foundation chair says he stepped down to highlight value of community status

    Igor Seletskiy, the founder of the AlmaLinux distro created in December 2020 as an alternative to CentOS, has explained that he stepped down as chair of the AlmaLinux Foundation in an effort to strengthen its community status - though his company still dominates the board.

    AlmaLinux is one of several distros to have sprung up, or demanded renewed attention, in the aftermath of Red Hat's decision to make CentOS a late preview of what will become Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) rather than a binary-compatible rebuild. Other contenders include Rocky Linux, founded by an original co-founder of CentOS, and Oracle Linux. AlmaLinux originated as a project of CloudLinux, a company and commercial distro which already tracked RHEL, and of which Seletskiy is CEO.

  • Embracing open culture: Fostering innovation and resilience through organizational change

    The increasing popularity of hybrid work arrangements has many organizations looking for new organizational and cultural strategies.

    On top of this, the ability to quickly adapt and innovate is increasingly critical to many organizations’ survival, but innovation is unpredictable and something you can neither plan for nor control.

    So what are leaders to do? How can you help new hybrid teams work together productively? How can you retain existing talent and attract new people to your organization? How can you encourage more rapid innovations and harness them more effectively?

    By deliberately reshaping your organizational culture to a more open model, you can create the conditions that enable more effective hybrid teams and increase individual engagement while also encouraging innovation, flexibility and growth.

  • Emotional intelligence: 6 powerful phrases of future CIOs | The Enterprisers Project

    The events of the last year and a half have proven how essential emotional intelligence is for CIOs leading their technology organizations through challenging times. “The requirements to lead through complexity and ambiguity, while using more influence rather than formal roles of position and authority, continue to grow,” says Noelle Akins, leadership coach and founder of Akins & Associates. High-EQ leadership is no longer an option; it’s mandatory for success.

    Emotional intelligence is evidenced in the way individuals behave and – just as importantly – the way they speak. “Quite simply, words matter,” says Patrick Malone, director of American University’s Key Executive Leadership Programs and author of "Leading with Love and Laughter: Letting Go and Getting Real at Work." “The way we communicate is the most impactful tool for building trust and bonds with our colleagues.”

    Earlier this year, we shared some simple yet effective phrases that CIOs and IT leaders use to practice and demonstrate their emotional intelligence. “A key aspect of emotional intelligence is relationship management,” says Dr. Sunni Lampasso, consulting psychologist, executive coach, and founder of Shaping Success. “The ability to communicate clearly and openly helps to establish credibility and build trust.”

What New Features to Expect in the Coming Release of Fedora 35

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Red Hat

Twice each year, in April and October, the community behind Fedora releases a new major version of the extremely popular Linux distribution. Currently scheduled for October 19, 2021, the release of Fedora 35 is quickly approaching. Let’s take a look at what you can expect when you install or upgrade to the 35th incarnation of the world’s most popular bleeding edge Linux distribution.

[...]

Fedora 35 is tentatively scheduled to be released on October 19 with a fallback date of October 26 in case of any release-blocking problems. While we’d love to see Fedora 35 released as soon as possible, history shows that it’s more likely that the release will come on the later date.

You can currently download Fedora 34 or the Fedora 35 Beta release from the Fedora Project’s website. You’ll also find links to both current and beta versions of the many Fedora spins.

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IBM/Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • ModelMesh and KServe bring eXtreme scale standardized model inferencing on Kubernetes

    One of the most fundamental parts of an AI application is model serving, which is responding to a user request with an inference from an AI model. With machine learning approaches becoming more widely adopted in organizations, there is a trend to deploy a large number of models. For internet-scale AI applications like IBM Watson Assistant and IBM Watson Natural Language Understanding, there isn’t just one AI model, there are literally hundreds or thousands that are running concurrently. Because AI models are computationally expensive, it’s cost prohibitive to load them all at once or to create a dedicated container to serve every trained model. Also, many are rarely used or are effectively abandoned.

    When dealing with a large number of models, the ‘one model, one server’ paradigm presents challenges on a Kubernetes cluster to deploy hundreds of thousands of models.

  • The Application Hierarchy of Needs for SREs and IT Operators – IBM Developer

    The Hierarchy of Needs was defined by the psychologist Abraham Maslow in his paper “A Theory of Human Motivation.” The base of the pyramid contains the most fundamental and most critical needs, with each subsequent layer representing needs that become important once those of the preceding layer have been satisfied.
    Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs” was used to represent the needs and behavioral motivation drivers for humans. This pyramid represented a series of basic psychological and self-fulfillment needs.

    Maslow’s hierarchy of needs has been adapted and adopted to represent the needs and motivations in other domains, including the needs of applications and services being managed by SREs and IT Operations teams.

  • A Red Hat validated pattern for Industrial Edge

    We've improved on the technology of our AI/ML Industrial Edge solution, designed to boost manufacturing efficiency and product quality with AI/ML, edge computing and Kubernetes. Let's see what's new!

  • Meet single node OpenShift: Our newest small OpenShift footprint for edge architectures

    Single node OpenShift is here, putting both control and worker capabilities into a single server to help fit into space-constrained environments.

  • Single node OpenShift at the manufacturing edge

    Where does it make sense to utilize single node OpenShift? Learn how it can help at the manufacturing edge!

  • Transitioning Red Hat’s Marketing leadership

    Today, we are sharing news that Tim Yeaton, Red Hat’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer (CMO) will retire in 2022. We’ve had the benefit of planning for Tim’s retirement for some time and using Red Hat’s succession planning process to identify and develop our next CMO. Long time Red Hat marketing communications and brand leader Leigh Day has been promoted to senior vice president (SVP) of Marketing and in January, she will assume the role of CMO. Until his retirement in mid-2022, Tim will become a senior advisor at Red Hat, helping with a smooth transition.

  • Customer experience (CX) plans: 5 questions to ask | The Enterprisers Project

    The pressure is on for companies to deliver a top-notch customer experience (CX). But to deliver a high-quality and holistic CX, you need to invest in the right data and technology. For IT leaders facing an abundance of options, investing in technology to enhance CX can feel like a gamble.

  • IBM Cheese Cutter Restoration | Hackaday

    For a while now, Mac Pro towers have had the nickname “cheese grater” because of their superficial resemblance to this kitchen appliance. Apple has only been a company since the 70s, though, and is much newer than one of its historic rivals, IBM. In fact, IBM is old enough to have made actual cheese-related computers as far back as the 1910s, and [Hand Tool Rescue] recently obtained one of these antique machines for a complete restoration.

  • Going to market with an open source product

    Many people with a long career in engineering, including me, have had misconceptions about sales and marketing. As an engineering community, we've viewed it as things like ordering swag, naming things, running ad campaigns, and creating white papers. There's a joke in the marketing community about how engineers are always willing to provide their "opinions" on marketing decisions without fully comprehending the discipline, but marketers rarely—like never—make suggestions on code improvements. To work together, engineers and marketers must share a common definition.

    While product marketers do help drive those commonly recognized tasks, the role is so much richer. Product marketers, technical marketers, and evangelists have outbound responsibilities like creating content (e.g., blogs, press releases, white papers, demos), delivering roadmap sessions to customers (as well as analysts and journalists), building content for sales teams, and much more. Combined, these outbound functions are often referred to as getting a product to market, but just as importantly, product marketing also has inbound functions. They serve as another set of eyes and ears to listen for customer needs and provide input to the product strategy. There's a saying in product management: nothing interesting happens within these four walls. Businesses must go out into the world, talk to customers, and more importantly, listen to them.

  • SUSE Announces Integration Of SUSE Rancher With Harvester

IBM, Red Hat, and AlmaLinux

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Red Hat
  • Kube by Example expands training curriculum with new learning paths for Kubernetes developers

    We see Kubernetes as the foundation for hybrid cloud, and hybrid cloud as the future of IT. The technology remains among both the most loved and most wanted tools in this year’s Stack Overflow Developer survey. Given its prevalence and strategic importance, we have also seen developers seeking out and engaging with Kubernetes-focused training resources like Kube by Example, an online destination for free Kubernetes-focused tutorials, news and community interaction.

    As the company behind the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat has backed Kube by Example and is diligently working to establish it as the premier destination for developers and operators to sharpen their Kubernetes skills in a hands-on environment.

  • Celebrating Ada Lovelace with 4 career lessons from women in technology

    Ada Lovelace is known as the first computer programmer. Mainly known for her work with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine in the 1800s, she was the first to recognize that the machine could do more than simple calculation — that it could follow a set of instructions (a program) to perform tasks. While Babbage’s computer was never built, Lovelace is credited with writing up an algorithm to be carried out by such a machine. Now, every year in mid-October, we celebrate women tech pioneers on Ada Lovelace Day.

  • Igor Seletskiy Steps Down to Assure AlmaLinux Independence - FOSS Force

    Today Igor Seletskiy, co-founder and CEO of CloudLinux, announced that he’s stepped down from his role as chairman of the board at the AlmaLinux Foundation, and is also vacating his seat on the board of directors.

    The foundation, which he started earlier this year, produces AlmaLinux, a drop-in replacement for Red Hat’s CentOS Linux that Seletskiy announced in December, shortly after Red Hat said it was moving the Linux distribution from its traditional role as a downstream clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux to sit upstream as RHEL’s “nightly build.”

    A replacement was needed because many organizations, including many Fortune 500 enterprises, use CentOS in production as a way to take advantage of RHEL’s stability without having to pay for support contracts.

    Both Seletskiy and the AlmaLinux Foundation are very clear there’s no palace intrigue behind this move. The new distro’s founder is stepping down not because of some power struggle within the organization, but because he wants the distro he birthed to have a life of its own as an independent project.

  • Why can't I use sudo with rootless Podman?

    I was recently asked: Why can't I run rootless Podman containers when I log into a user via sudo or su? The problem is a bit complex to explain, so I'll start with an example.

  • Digital transformation: 3 myths the pandemic busted

    When the pandemic struck, most organizations had no choice but to accelerate their digital technology adoption. Many condensed into a matter of months what might otherwise have been years of consideration, strategizing, and change.

    According to a survey by McKinsey, the pandemic sparked a seven-year increase in the rate at which companies developed digital or digitally enhanced offerings. It accelerated the digitization of their customer and supply-chain interactions and internal operations by three to four years.

    This shift sparked a new reality for today’s organizations to remain competitive and meet customers’ changing needs. But while enterprises have certainly dedicated more resources to the process of digital transformation, many misconceptions still remain.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • NodeConf Remote 2021 preview: 4 must-see talks | Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat is heading to NodeConf Remote on October 18–21, 2021! We'll be demonstrating a few of our favorite production-quality tools and solutions, all designed to help teams maintain productivity while successfully navigating the vast and rapidly changing cloud-native landscape.

    Talk with an expert during the virtual booth crawl and get a look at our latest workflows for building cloud-native JavaScript solutions on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. Our open source specialists are ready to show you how JavaScript and Node.js integrate with other technologies like authentication, distributed data caching and streaming, and business automation to deliver real value to customers.

  • Making a difference: From technical writer to managing a Support Delivery team

    Red Hat's Products and Technologies organization is doing game-changing work in the IT industry, so we're taking a closer look at some of the talented Red Hatters from around the world who are enabling our continued evolution. In showcasing their unique stories, it's clear that there's no one path to finding success as a Red Hatter. For each of us, it's about open collaboration and building something together.

  • 10 steps to a better Dockerfile

    The journey to the cloud typically starts with containerizing your apps. One of the first challenges developers face is writing the blueprint for those container images—aka a Dockerfile. This article guides you through nine steps to writing better Dockerfiles. The basis for our example is a popular Spring application.

  • Tools and practices for remote development teams

    During the height of the COVID-19 global pandemic, tens of millions of workers transitioned from the office to working from home. It was an unfamiliar way of doing things for many organizations—a true sink-or-swim scenario. Development teams are among those affected, and the challenges that we face are sometimes very specific. In this article, we explore a few tools and practices that can help distributed development teams work and collaborate from home. Hopefully, this exploration will be helpful to you and your team seeking a “new normal" after COVID-19.

  • The great resignation: 14 stats on the state of the IT career market

    The turnover tsunami has officially begun: Twice the number of workers in the U.S. are looking to jump ship now versus two years ago, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the largest HR association in the U.S.

    That’s a result of the pent-up desire for greener pastures that employees put on hold during the uncertain days of the pandemic. Good news for IT professionals pursuing opportunities now: There are more positions than ever before as technology job growth continues to outpace the overall job growth rate in the U.S.

  • Will IT automation kill my job? | Enable Sysadmin

    A few times in my previous job, I wondered about automating myself out of a job. I was working on a small, three-person project, and we were responsible for creating various automation tasks for our larger team to use. There was a point where we had many things automated to make our team's life very easy, but that did not mean our work was done.

Gaming on Fedora

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Red Hat
Gaming

Gaming is a beautiful hobby that many people are engaging with. Across all demographics people are busy creating their own digital farms, working together in combat, or simply socializing while maintaining a space-ship, free of impostors. All of this can be done on Fedora Linux. And while it doesn’t have a name for being flashy, looks can be deceiving. Keep reading to find out how you can play the latest video games on Fedora Linux.

With its mission statement emphasizing features and innovation, Fedora is often on the forefront of embracing new technologies, the latest Linux kernels and the latest drivers. All without sacrificing stability or reliability. Fedora won’t cripple itself in an attempt to be first, but it will certainly try to lead by example.

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More in Tux Machines

CuteFish – An Elegant, Beautiful and Easy-to-Use Linux Desktop

CutefishOS is a new free and open-source desktop environment for Linux operating systems with a focus on simplicity, beauty, and practicality. Its goal is to create a better computing experience for Linux users. Cutefish OS is among the newest kids on the block of desktop environments. And since it has been born at such a time when the KDE aesthetic leads in the UI/UX stand for Linux users, it features a design that is strikingly similar. Given its goal of making a better desktop experience, the team uses KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma 5, and Qt. My guess is that Qt is the source of its “cute” name. They seem to have collaborated heavily with JingOS, a beautiful Linux OS targeted at Tablets. Read more

Former Microsoft Security Analyst Claims Office 365 Knowingly Hosted Malware For Years

Malware on Windows devices has become a real problem in the last few years, specifically with a recent uptick in ransomware. It appears that Microsoft has been trying to combat this issue, though, with updates to Microsoft Defender, so it has more teeth than ever before. However, what if Microsoft is part of the problem too? On Friday, cybersecurity researcher TheAnalyst explained on Twitter how BazarLoader malware leads to ransomware that can severely affect healthcare, among other industries. He then called out Microsoft, asking if the company has “any responsibility in this when they KNOWINGLY are hosting hundreds of files leading to this,” alongside an image of what appears to be malicious files being hosted in OneDrive. Read more

today's leftovers

  • pam-krb5 4.11

    The primary change in this release of my Kerberos PAM module is support for calling pam_end with PAM_DATA_SILENT. I had not known that the intent of this flag was to signal that only process resources were being cleaned up and external resources should not be (in part because an older version of the man page doesn't make this clear).

  • QB64 Hits Version 2.0, Gets Enhanced Debugging | Hackaday

    Despite the name, BASIC isn’t exactly a language recommended for beginners these days. Technology has moved on, and now most people would steer you towards Python if you wanted to get your feet wet with software development. But for those who got their first taste of programming by copying lines of BASIC out of a computer magazine, the language still holds a certain nostalgic appeal.

  • All Things Open: Diversity Event Today - Big Top Goes Up Monday! - FOSS Force

    By now things are going full tilt boogie in downtown Raleigh, as the All Things Open conference is well into its “pre” day. Keeping with the trend set by other conferences, All Things Open opens a day ahead of time, partially to stage free event’s that aren’t officially a part of the main show, but which offer attendees from out-of-town a reason to fly in a day early to settle in. This is good for the travelling attendees, because they don’t spend the first day suffering for jet lag or other forms of travel fatigue, and good for the event, because it means that more people are in place to fill seats and attend presentations, beginning with the opening keynote. [...] At ATO, the registration desks are open on Sunday from noon until 5:30 Eastern Time, and the pre-conference is a free Inclusion and Diversity Event that started at noon and will run until 5pm, emceed by Rikki Endsley, formally with Red Hat and now a community marketing manager at Amazon Web Services.

  • [Older] Arduino Nano Pros and Cons: Is the Cheapest Arduino Worth It?

    While there is quite an array of Arduino boards to choose from, the Nano is a versatile board suitable for almost all DIY electronic projects. These tiny micro controllers make compact DIY hardware development available to more people than ever before. In the past we have covered reasons you may not want to choose a genuine Arduino for your projects, but today lets take a look at the positives and negatives of the Arduino Nano.

  • Pnevmo-Capsula: Domiki rolls onto Windows, Mac and Linux

    Usually the term "on rails" refers to a highly linear experience over which the player has little control. But sometimes it's meant far more literally than that, as is the case in Pomeshkin Valentin Igorevich's recently released steampunk adventure, Pnevmo-Capsula: Domiki.

  • How to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook in 2021

    Today we are looking at how to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

Digital Restrictions (DRM) on Printers