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Red Hat

Fedora, CNCF and IBM-Paid Puff Pieces

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Red Hat
Server
  • Changing how we work

    As those of you who read the https://communityblog.fedoraproject.org/state-of-the-community-platform-engineering-team/ blog know, we are looking at changing workflows and organization around in the Community Platform Engineering team (of which, I am a member). So, I thought I would share a few thoughts from my perspective and hopefully enlighten the community more on why we are changing things and what that might look like.

  • Kubernetes policy project takes enterprise IT by storm

    An open source compliance as code project has gained a groundswell of popularity over the last six months among enterprise IT pros, who say it simplifies and standardizes Kubernetes policy management.

    The Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open source compliance as code project founded by former VMware employees, was used at Netflix as early as 2017 and accepted into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a sandbox project in March 2018. Netflix gave an OPA demonstration at KubeCon in December 2017, and Intuit and Capital One followed at KubeCon in December 2018. After the project advanced to the CNCF's incubating stage in April 2019, and was demonstrated a third time at KubeCon EU in May 2019, it began to generate mainstream buzz.

    [...]

    As Kubernetes environments grow to encompass Istio service mesh and Knative event-based orchestration in what Google calls the open cloud stack, the fact that OPA lends itself to Kubernetes policy enforcement but can expand to include those adjacent utilities boosts its appeal.

  • The Who, What, Where, When, and Why for Mainframe Security [Ed: IBM pays Ponemon for puff pieces]

    For most people, security is a bit of a nuisance. No-one likes having to keep updating their password and then needing to remember the new one. And then there’s all the different passwords that need to be remembered for different things. It all just seems like an administrative nightmare. It just makes getting a day’s work done harder. That’s what most users think right up until the moment there’s a breach. And suddenly the mood has changed. Now everyone wants to know exactly what’s happened. They want to know who has done what, where they’ve done it, when it occurred, how they got in, and a million other questions. Your phone is ringing off the hook. Your e-mail is filling up faster than usual. What can you do? Where can you access the information you need? How do you respond to the incident?

Post-$34 billion acquisition by IBM, Red Hat bets big on India

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Red Hat

After the International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) completed the acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion earlier this month, a top executive from the iconic software company with an open source development model has said that it was a "match made in heaven" that will help it accelerate growth globally, including in India.

In India, Red Hat, which specialises in Linux operating systems, has engineering facilities in Pune and Bengaluru.

[...]

Founded in 1993, Red Hat is credited for bringing open source -- including technologies like Linux, Kubernetes, Ansible, Java and Ceph, among others -- into the mainstream for the enterprises.

Today, Red Hat products and services are widely used by government agencies as well as emerging companies in technology, finance, healthcare, civil aviation and other industries.

Armonk, New York-headquartered IBM particularly hopes that Red Hat's open hybrid Cloud technologies would help it position itself as a leading hybrid Cloud provider.

"At the core of what we do is turning projects in the open source communities into products because at the end of the day, our customer is an enterprise software customer," Allessio said.

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IBM Announcements

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Red Hat

Fedora and IBM/Red Hat: Network Security Toolkit (NST), Fedora CoreOS and Openwashing at OSCON

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Red Hat
  • Network Security Toolkit (NST) 30 SVN 11210, which is Based on Fedora 30

    Network Security Toolkit (NST) is a Linux-based live operating system that provides a set of free and open-source computer security and networking tools to perform routine security and networking diagnostic and monitoring tasks.

    It is based on Fedora and NST has included comprehensive set of Open Source Network Security Tools, which is published in sectools.org website.

    It is offering an advanced Web User Interface (GUI) for system/network administrator, which allows them to configure many network and security applications.

    NST Team is pleased to announce the latest NST release of “NST 30 SVN:11210” on 1th July 2019.

  • Fedora announces the first preview release of Fedora CoreOS as an automatically updating Linux OS for containerized workloads

    Three days ago, Fedora announced the first preview release of the open-source project Fedora CoreOS as a secure and reliable host for computer clusters. It is specifically designed for running containerized workloads with automatic updates to the latest OS improvements, bug fixes, and security updates. It is secure, minimal, monolithic and is optimized for working with Kubernetes.

    The main goal of Fedora CoreOS is to be a reliable container host to run containerized workloads securely and at scale. It integrates Ignition from Container Linux technology and rpm-ostree and SELinux hardening from Project Atomic Host.

    Fedora CoreOS is expected to be a successor to Container Linux eventually. The Container Linux project will continue to be supported throughout 2019, leaving users with ample time to migrate and provide feedback. Fedora has also assured Container Linux users that continued support will be provided to them without any disruption. Fedora CoreOS will also become the successor to Fedora Atomic Host. The current plan is for Fedora Atomic Host to have at least a 29 version and 6 months of lifecycle.

  • IBM helps developers use open source and machine learning

    As artificial intelligence and machine learning become more widespread, it's essential that developers have access to the latest models and data sets.

    Today at the OSCON 2019 open source developer conference, IBM is announcing the launch of two new projects for developers.

IBM and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Big Blue’s Red Hat Brings A Big Change Of Heart

    Perhaps, many years hence, we will call the company that, more than any other, created the enterprise computing environment Big Purple now that it has acquired the company that made open source software in the enterprise safe, sane, and affordable.

    Twenty years ago next month, Red Hat went public and everything about enterprise software changed. A company with some tens of millions of dollars in revenues, providing subscription support for a commercial Linux distribution for systems within a few months had a ridiculous market capitalization in excess of $20 billion and the mad dash for open source projects to be commercialized was on.

    Fast forward two decades, and Red Hat is the touchstone for how to work with upstream open source software projects related to datacenter infrastructure and to bring them downstream to harden them to be enterprise grade, package them up, and then sell support for them. Red Hat is by far and away the most successful provider of commercial support for open source code, and has moved well beyond its foundational Enterprise Linux distribution, mostly through key acquisitions including the companies behind the GNU compilers, JBoss application server, the KVM hypervisor, the Gluster parallel file system, the Ceph object storage, the innovative CoreOS Linux distribution, and the Ansible software provisioning tools as well as the OpenShift container controller (a mix of in-house and Kubernetes code these days), the OpenStack cloud controller, and the CloudForms hybrid cloud management system (also largely done in-house). Red Hat, we think, still needs to have a heavy duty open source database management system distribution – perhaps several different ones with different architectural tenets – but it was also perhaps prescient in that it stayed out of the Hadoop storage and data analytics racket, which has not panned out as planned.

  • Splunk Connect for OpenShift: All About Objects

    This is the second post of our blog series on Red Hat OpenShift and Splunk Integration. In the first post, we showed how to send application and system logs to Splunk. The second part is focused on how to use Splunk Kubernetes Objects.

  • Command Line Heroes season 3 episode 2: Learning the BASICs

    Command Line Heroes explores how beginner languages bring people into the world of programming. BASIC lowered the barrier to entry. Now, the next generation is getting their start modifying games, like Minecraft. Listen to the episode.

  • Introducing Red Hat Smart Management for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    How do you want to manage your systems? That probably depends a lot on the type of environment you have -- whether your systems are primarily on-prem, or if they reside in the cloud. Or a mixture of both. Either way, Red Hat is looking to meet you where you're at and provide management tools to suit your needs with Red Hat Smart Management.

    We introduced Red Hat Smart Management at Red Hat Summit earlier this year in Boston as a layered add on for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), as well as including Red Hat Insights with RHEL subscriptions.

Fedora, Red Hat Learning Community and Kubernetes

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Server
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.2. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, July 22, 2019 through Monday, July 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • Red Hat Learning Community fosters open source tech education and reaches 10k members

    We are pleased to announce that the Red Hat Learning Community has reached more than 10,000 members! Since its launch in September 2018, the community has shown itself to be a valuable hub for those seeking to share knowledge and build their open source skill set.

    When we first started out, this was just an idea. We set out to support, enable, and motivate new and experienced open source learners as they learn how to work with Red Hat technologies, validate their technical skill sets, build careers and pursue Red Hat Certifications. We soft launched the community in July 2018 and invited 400 Red Hat Training instructors, students, curriculum developers and certifications team members to jump-start community discussion boards and earn a founding member badge.

  • skuba Dives into Open Source Waters

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4, our next major release is now in beta. It has major architectural improvements for our customers. In the process of planning and developing it, we took a close look at bootstrapping clusters and managing node membership, and we listened to our customers. One of the things we heard from many of them was that they wanted a way to deploy multiple clusters efficiently, by scripting the bootstrap process or by integrating it into other management tools they use.
    To address this, we committed even more strongly to our upstream participation in Kubernetes development. Instead of building SUSE-specific tools as we had in earlier versions, we contributed the efforts of SUSE engineers to the upstream kubeadm component, helping it bridge the gap between its current state and the abilities we had previously implemented in the Velum web interface. Our bootstrap and node management strategy in version 4 is built on kubeadm.

  • Deprecated APIs Removed In 1.16: Here’s What You Need To Know

    As the Kubernetes API evolves, APIs are periodically reorganized or upgraded. When APIs evolve, the old API is deprecated and eventually removed.

Red Hat/IBM and Fedora Leftovers

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Server
  • An introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines

    Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 offers a developer preview of OpenShift Pipelines, which enable the creation of cloud-native, Kubernetes-style continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines based on the Tekton project. In a recent article on the Red Hat OpenShift blog, I provided an introduction to Tekton and pipeline concepts and described the benefits and features of OpenShift Pipelines.
    OpenShift Pipelines builds upon the Tekton project to enable teams to build Kubernetes-style delivery pipelines that they can fully control and own the complete lifecycle of their microservices without having to rely on central teams to maintain and manage a CI server, plugins, and its configurations.

  • IBM's New Open Source Kabanero Promises to Simplify Kubernetes for DevOps

    At OSCON, IBM unveiled a new open source platform that promises to make Kubernetes easier to manage for DevOps teams.

  • MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift

    As a software developer, it’s often necessary to access a relational database—or any type of database, for that matter. If you’ve been held back by that situation where you need to have someone in operations provision a database for you, then this article will set you free. I’ll show you how to spin up (and wipe out) a MySQL database in seconds using Red Hat OpenShift.

    Truth be told, there are several databases that can be hosted in OpenShift, including Microsoft SQL Server, Couchbase, MongoDB, and more. For this article, we’ll use MySQL. The concepts, however, will be the same for other databases. So, let’s get some knowledge and leverage it.

  • What you need to know to be a sysadmin

    The system administrator of yesteryear jockeyed users and wrangled servers all day, in between mornings and evenings spent running hundreds of meters of hundreds of cables. This is still true today, with the added complexity of cloud computing, containers, and virtual machines.

    Looking in from the outside, it can be difficult to pinpoint what exactly a sysadmin does, because they play at least a small role in so many places. Nobody goes into a career already knowing everything they need for a job, but everyone needs a strong foundation. If you're looking to start down the path of system administration, here's what you should be concentrating on in your personal or formal training.

  • Building blocks of syslog-ng

    Recently I gave a syslog-ng introductory workshop at Pass the SALT conference in Lille, France. I got a lot of positive feedback, so I decided to turn all that feedback into a blog post. Naturally, I shortened and simplified it, but still managed to get enough material for multiple blog posts.

  • PHP version 7.2.21RC1 and 7.3.8RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.387RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 28-29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.20RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • QElectroTech version 0.70

    RPM of QElectroTech version 0.70, an application to design electric diagrams, are available in remi for Fedora and Enterprise Linux 7.

    A bit more than 1 year after the version 0.60 release, the project have just released a new major version of their electric diagrams editor.

IBM, Fedora, and Servers

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Red Hat
Server
  • Red Hat CTO Chris Wright to host online Q&A

    On Tuesday, July 23, 2019, Red Hat senior vice president and CTO Chris Wright will host an online forum to answer questions about what IBM's landmark acquisition of Red Hat means for the company and its work in open source projects.

  • Announcing Fedora CoreOS preview

    On behalf of the Fedora CoreOS Working Group, I'm thrilled to announce the first preview release of Fedora CoreOS. Fedora CoreOS is built to be the secure and reliable host for your compute clusters. It's designed specifically for running containerized workloads without regular maintenance, automatically updating itself with the latest OS improvements, bug fixes, and security updates. The initial preview release of Fedora CoreOS runs on bare metal, QEMU, VMware, and AWS, on x86_64 only. It supports provisioning via Ignition spec 3.0.0 and the Fedora CoreOS Config Transpiler, automatic updates with Zincati and rpm-ostree, and running containers with Podman and Moby. In the coming months, we'll be adding more platforms, building out functionality, and creating documentation to get Fedora CoreOS ready for production use. For now, the Fedora CoreOS preview should not be used for production workloads, and it might change in incompatible ways before the stable release.

  • Pivotal Brings the Magic of CF Push to Kubernetes

    Today, Pivotal released an alpha version of its flagship product, Pivotal Application Service, powered by Kubernetes. Access to the bits are invite-only; contact your account team or sign up via the form at the end of this post for access. The documentation is publicly available here.

    Kubernetes is the new IaaS. And that means we're embedding it into more parts of Pivotal technology. It also means that we're here to help you achieve terrific business outcomes on top of this foundation.

  • Build cloud-native apps faster for Kubernetes with Kabanero, a new open source project from IBM

    As companies modernize their infrastructure and adopt a hybrid cloud strategy, they’re increasingly turning to Kubernetes and containers. Choosing the right technology for building cloud-native apps and gaining the knowledge you need to effectively adopt Kubernetes is difficult. On top of that, enabling architects, developers, and operations to work together easily, while having their individual requirements met, is an additional challenge when moving to cloud.
    To lower the barrier of entry for developers to use Kubernetes and to bring together different disciplines, IBM created new open source projects that make it faster and easier for you to develop and deploy applications for Kubernetes.

  • Kubernetes VS PaaS

    If you asked me 3 years ago, I would probably define the professional part of myself as a “Rails developer”. Back then, most of my new projects started with a proof of concept deployed on a free Heroku account. The reason is simple, that was the fastest way to get my Ruby application live. At the same time it was the cheapest (free right?) so that was a no-brainer.
    The last 2.5 years, my work has been mostly on CloudFoundry and Kubernetes. CloudFoundry is an Open Source PaaS solution and Kubernetes is a Container orchestration platform. I work on a project that combines these two (SUSE CloudFoundry runs CloudFoundry on top of Kubernetes). There is an argument I’ve heard more than once regarding running a PaaS on top of Kubernetes and that is: “Why deploy CloudFoundry on top of Kubernetes and not use Kubernetes directly?”. Maybe it’s my science studies, maybe it’s Myth Busters, but I had to test this theory. Thankfully, 2 times a year we get a week to hack on anything we want at SUSE (Check it out) so I got the time I needed a couple of weeks ago.

  • Issue #2019.07.22 – Kubeflow and Conferences, 2019

    Kubeflow at OSCON 2019 – Over 10 sessions! Covering security, pipelines, productivity, ML ops and more. Some of the sessions are led by end-users, which means you’ll get the real deal about using Kubeflow in your production solution

  • How to earn a promotion as a sysadmin

    There’s plenty of general advice when it comes to career advancement, such as, “Work hard and you’ll get ahead.”

    General advice can start to feel a little pat—too simplistic to put into action, or too difficult to measure. Surely, it’s not as simple as, “Work hard and watch the promotions roll in.” Not to mention, how would you know if it’s the right promotion. Is it one that matches your goals?

    This question becomes particularly important in IT. What if you’re a sysadmin who’s not particularly interested in managing a team of people? Do you grin and bear it while others move up the food chain?

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • OpenShift 4: Image Builds

    One of the key differentiators of Red Hat OpenShift as a Kubernetes distribution is the ability to build container images using the platform via first class APIs. This means there is no separate infrastructure or manual build processes required to create images that will be run on the platform. Instead, the same infrastructure can be used to produce the images and run them. For developers, this means one less barrier to getting their code deployed.

    With OpenShift 4, we have significantly redesigned how this build infrastructure works. Before that sets off alarm bells, I should emphasize that for a consumer of the build APIs and resulting images, the experience is nearly identical. What has changed is what happens under the covers when a build is executed and source code is turned into a runnable image.

  • libinput's new thumb detection code

    The average user has approximately one thumb per hand. That thumb comes in handy for a number of touchpad interactions. For example, moving the cursor with the index finger and clicking a button with the thumb. On so-called Clickpads we don't have separate buttons though. The touchpad itself acts as a button and software decides whether it's a left, right, or middle click by counting fingers and/or finger locations. Hence the need for thumb detection, because you may have two fingers on the touchpad (usually right click) but if those are the index and thumb, then really, it's just a single finger click.

    libinput has had some thumb detection since the early days when we were still hand-carving bits with stone tools. But it was quite simplistic, as the old documentation illustrates: two zones on the touchpad, a touch started in the lower zone was always a thumb. Where a touch started in the upper thumb area, a timeout and movement thresholds would decide whether it was a thumb. Internally, the thumb states were, Schrödinger-esque, "NO", "YES", and "MAYBE". On top of that, we also had speed-based thumb detection - where a finger was moving fast enough, a new touch would always default to being a thumb. On the grounds that you have no business dropping fingers in the middle of a fast interaction. Such a simplistic approach worked well enough for a bunch of use-cases but failed gloriously in other cases.

  • 21 to 1: How Red Hat amplifies partner revenue

    At Red Hat Summit, we announced new research from IDC looking at the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to the global economy. The study, sponsored by Red Hat, found that the workloads running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux are expected to "touch" more than $10 trillion worth of global business revenues in 2019 - powering roughly 5% of the worldwide economy. While that statistic alone is eye popping, these numbers, according to the report, are only expected to grow in the coming years, fueled by more organizations embracing hybrid cloud infrastructures. As a result, there is immense opportunity for Red Hat partners and potential partners to capitalize on the growth and power of RHEL.

  • Executing .NET Core functions in a separate process [Ed: IBM/Red Hat is pushing Microsoft patent traps again (and yes, Microsoft still suing]
  • DevNation Live: 17-million downloads of Visual Studio Code Java extension [Ed: Also celebrating for Microsoft again (as if helping the proprietary MSVS 'ecosystem' is their goal now)]
  • The NeuroFedora Blog: NEURON in NeuroFedora needs testing

    We have been working on including the NEURON simulator in NeuroFedora for a while now. The build process that NEURON uses has certain peculiarities that make it a little harder to build.

    For those that are interested in the technical details, while the main NEURON core is built using the standard ./configure; make ; make install process that cleanly differentiates the "build" and "install" phases, the Python bits are built as a "post-install hook". That is to say, they are built after the other bits in the "install" step instead of the "build" step. This implies that the build is not quite straightforward and must be slightly tweaked to ensure that the Fedora packaging guidelines are met.

From Linux to cloud, why Red Hat matters for every enterprise

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Linux
Red Hat

In 1994, if you wanted to make money from Linux, you were selling Linux CDs for $39.95. By 2016, Red Hat became the first $2 billion Linux company. But, in the same year, Red Hat was shifting its long-term focus from Linux to the cloud.

Here's how Red Hat got from mail-order CDs to the top Linux company and a major cloud player. And, now that Red Hat is owned by IBM, where it will go from here.

Read more

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Oracle Linux on Btrfs for the Raspberry Pi

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Here's why Windows 10 users are switching to other platforms

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Nils Brauckmann, SUSE's CEO, Steps Down (The first of many goodbyes)

I have recently made the decision to retire as the SUSE CEO and subsequently to leave SUSE. I care very deeply for the SUSE business and its employees, and this difficult decision is based entirely on personal reasons. My step down from the SUSE CEO role will be effective August 5. My decision comes at a positive point in time for SUSE, where the business has completed its journey to becoming standalone and has a solid foundation to continue to accelerate its success and growth as an independent company. For me personally this means I will have more time to devote myself to other important things in my life. In FY18, the SUSE business saw record-breaking revenues. This level of growth has only been realized through the whole SUSE Team showing huge commitment to working together to deliver great outcomes. I am extremely proud of what we have achieved collectively over the last eight years, and I have every confidence that SUSE will exceed all future expectations. I will naturally be following the SUSE journey closely during my retirement, and my positive wishes will always be with the company and all connected with it. As we look to the future I am delighted and, of course, reassured to be passing the SUSE CEO baton to such a talented and accomplished leader as Melissa Di Donato. Melissa has an outstanding track record of growth, leadership and transformation in the tech sector, having enjoyed enormous success as the chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP. Prior to SAP, she held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contribution to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management. Read more

7-Way Linux Distribution Benchmarks For July 2019, Including LTO'ed openSUSE Tumbleweed

As it's been a few weeks since last hosting any Linux distribution comparison and now with the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed enabling LTO by default, here are some fresh Linux distribution comparison results plus tossing the newly-released Debian 10.0 into the mix as well. This round of testing included Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 19.04, Fedora Workstation 30, openSUSE Leap 15.1, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Clear Linux 30450, and Debian 10.0. This round of benchmarking was done on an Intel Core i9 7980XE with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 16GB of RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X graphics, and Samsung 970 EVO 500GB NVMe solid-state drive. The Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora, Clear Linux, and Debian releases were all tested following clean installations with all stable release updates present as of testing. Manjaro/Arch isn't in this round of testing due to Manjaro running into issues with Nouveau on the GTX TITAN X present in this test system. Unfortunately I didn't have any very recent openSUSE Tumbleweed benchmark results handy pre-LTO-by-default and with not being aware of any other way to roll-back/archive the Tumbleweed system state, there are just Tumbleweed tests from the latest build after they began defaulting to Link Time Optimizations on their packages. System details below in full for this default/out-of-the-box Linux performance experience comparison. Read more