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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora: Red Hat Satellite, CRI-O and Podman, EPEL Proposal, Outreachy, NeuroFedora and Cockpit

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Satellite Ask Me Anything Q&A from April 2019

    For anyone not familiar, the Satellite AMAs are an ask me anything-style event where we invite Red Hat customers to bring all of their questions about Red Hat Satellite, drop them in the chat, and members of the Satellite product team will answer as many of them live as we can during the AMA and we then follow up with a blog post detailing the questions and answers.

  • Why Red Hat is investing in CRI-O and Podman

    As an engineering organization, Red Hat is investing in CRI-O and Podman, participating in the Open Containers Initiative standards body, testing performance and security, as well as driving architectural changes in a number of container projects because the underlying shared components help drive innovation in its products like Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. These investments are closely related to the operating system itself and provide our customers with the best products we can produce.

  • EPEL Proposal: EPEL Master branch AKA Rawhide

    In order to allow for the ability for faster availability of packages, add rawhide branches for EPEL-7 and EPEL-8. These branches would allow developers to build new packages they aren't sure are ready for either EPEL-N or EPEL-N-testing, and would allow for faster rebuilds of newer features when RHEL has a large feature change. 

  • FHP: Outreachy! Is it that hard to crack?

    Getting into one of the reputed internship programs might seem scary and unachievable especially when you don’t consider yourself an expert in that field, but trust me it’s not that hard to get into. How can I say this with so much certainty? Well, I got into Outreachy, one of the prestigious internships as a Fedora intern and through this article, I want to share my journey with you all.

  • Fedora science/research get together at Flock

    This year, Flock will be held in Budapest from August 8--11. As part of NeuroFedora, we've already proposed a talk to discuss how Free/Open source software links very very well with Free/Open science. Please see the proposal here, and give feedback: https://pagure.io/flock/issue/112.

    Apart from that, given that a large number of community members congregate at Flock, it may be a good chance to get together those of us that work in science/research and related areas. So, if you are planning to attend Flock and work in, or are interested in science/research, please drop a note at this tracker ticket: https://pagure.io/neuro-sig/NeuroFedora/issue/242

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 195

    It’s now easier to configure Cockpit’s web server cockpit-ws to run behind a TLS termination proxy. If the proxy runs on the same machine, then cockpit-ws can be run with the new --for-tls-proxy option, which will adjust the allowed Origins and Content-Security-Policy to https:// URLs. With this option, it’s no longer necessary to explicitly configure cockpit.conf.

Fedora 28 End of Life

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Red Hat

With the recent release of Fedora 30, Fedora 28 officially enters End Of Life (EOL) status effective May 28, 2019. This impacts any systems still on Fedora 28. If you’re not sure what that means to you, read more below.

At this point, packages in the Fedora 28 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, the community adds no new packages to the Fedora 28 collection starting at End of Life. Essentially, the Fedora 28 release will not change again, meaning users no longer receive the normal benefits of this leading-edge operating system.

There’s an easy, free way to keep those benefits. If you’re still running an End of Life version such as Fedora 28, now is the perfect time to upgrade to Fedora 29 or to Fedora 30. Upgrading gives you access to all the community-provided software in Fedora.

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Fedora: Flatpak, NeuroFedora and More

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Red Hat

When the future isn't clear, don't make a plan

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Red Hat
OSS

For the past two years at Red Hat Summit, I've argued that traditional planning is dead. The increasing speed of technological innovation, as well as the shift to more open styles of production and organization, are forcing everyone to rethink how we go about setting, executing on, and measuring performance against goals.

Those who've heard me talk about this have been sympathetic—but also skeptical. "I see your point," executives tell me, "but I still need to do something to prepare my organization for the future. And isn't that planning?"

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Fedora and GNOME: Fedora's GNOME Shell, Matthew Miller, GNOME in Google Summer of Code and Upcoming GNOME Board Elections

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Red Hat
GNOME
  • 5 GNOME keyboard shortcuts to be more productive

    For some people, using GNOME Shell as a traditional desktop manager may be frustrating since it often requires more action of the mouse. In fact, GNOME Shell is also a desktop manager designed for and meant to be driven by the keyboard. Learn how to be more efficient with GNOME Shell with these 5 ways to use the keyboard instead of the mouse.

  • Matthew Miller (Fedora’s Project Leader) Fields Reddit Questions

    We got the following interesting news from Reddit website.

    Matthew Miller, Fedora’s Project Leader, has discussed with the community and answered all kind of questions via Reddit.

    he directly answered users questions in the public forum and it was happened for third time.

    He requested users to ask any questions except IBM deal.

    Users were asked many questions in various topics.

  • Battle-cruiser operational !

    I’m currently an engineering student and during my free time I contribute to this cool open-source app called GNOME Games (or just Games for short).

    One would expect an app with that name to be some kind of collection of mini games for GNOME but you would be wrong. Games markets itself as a “games manager”, which means it automatically detects all of the games installed on your machine and lists them, such that you have all of your games nicely gathered together in one window.

  • Getting Selected for Google SoC’19

    Today is a every special day for me. In my very first try, I cracked the Google Summer of Code. I am very delighted to have been given an oppurtunity to work for GNOME Foundation.

    My task is to rebuild the GTK website. For those interested in technicalities of the project, the current website is made in PHP which is a great web language, however not so useful for creating static websites. So my job is to build a new website from scratch which uses the concept of Content Management System. I will be using Jekyll for this purpose and the website would be deployed using Gitlab’s Continuous Integration.

  • The Journey Begins

    This blog is gonna be about my journey of Google Summer of Code. It was just few months ago, when I had no idea what GSoC is or how open source development works. Randomly, I stumbled upon youtube talks about open source development. The scale and boldness of OSDG really intrigued me. My whole life I have always been fascinated by new ideas or technologies, and it is my biggest dream to be part of such flow. I always like to challenge myself with new problems and tasks. So I dived into world of open source. When I decided I wanted to contribute to some org, I started looking for different types of orgs, I came across many orgs which sounded interesting. One of them was GNOME. I have been GNOME user since I started using laptops. I have been fascinated by the vast scale of GNOME applications. I definitely wanted to contribute something to this org. I started exploring different projects within GNOME, since all of them were interesting, I filtered projects by the technology I am most comfortable with.

  • Google Summer of Code 2019 with Gnome-Gitg

    I am really excited to share with you all that this summer I will be working full-time with Gnome on the project Implement side-by side diff view on the Gitg application.

    I am really grateful to the community who considered me the right person for the job and gave me this wonderful opportunity.

  • Why you can and should apply for the board

    It’s GNOME board elections time!

    Community members can apply to become GNOME Foundation directors, and the process is quite easy, it’s just about sending an email to two mailing lists. We can improve on the number of participation though, and having a good amount of applicants is important for having a healthy foundation - the more applicants there are, the more likely that different views, skills and working areas are represented.

    I believe one of the big factors of not having high participation in elections is the lack of knowledge of what the board does and how much of a commitment it is. Because of that, we question whether we are ready for taking on the position. While minutes published by the board are an excellent tool (and I really need to thank Phillip and Federico here), minutes usually don’t tell the whole story.

Review: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0

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Red Hat
Reviews

My experiment with RHEL 8 got off to a rough start. Going through the on-line registration process produced some errors and ended up with me getting the wrong ISO which, in turn, resulted in some confusion and delays in getting the distribution installed.

Things then began to look up as RHEL 8 did a good job of detecting my system's hardware, registered itself without incident and offered good performance on physical hardware. I was particularly pleased that the distribution appears to detect whether our video card will work well with Wayland and either displays or hides Wayland sessions in response. I did have some trouble with the GNOME Classic Wayland session and GNOME Shell on X.Org was a bit sluggish. However, the Classic session on X.Org and GNOME Shell on Wayland both worked very well. In short, it's worthwhile to explore each of the four desktop options to see what works best for the individual.

The big issues I ran into with RHEL were with regards to software management. Both GNOME Software and the Cockpit screen for managing applications failed to work at all, whether run as root or a regular user. When using the command line dnf package manager, the utility failed to perform searches unless run with sudo and occasionally crashed. In a similar vein, the Bash feature that checks for matching packages when the user types a command name it doesn't recognize does not work and produces a lengthy error.

There were some security features or design choices that I think will mostly appeal to enterprise users, but are less favourable in home or small office environments. Allowing remote root logins by default on the Workstation role rubs me the wrong way, though I realize it is often useful when setting up servers. The enforced complex passwords are similarly better suited to offices than home users. One feature which I think most people will enjoy is SELinux which offers an extra layer of security, thought I wish the Cockpit feature to toggle SELinux had worked to make trouble-shooting easier.

I was not surprised that RHEL avoids shipping some media codecs. The company has always been cautious in this regard. I had hoped that trying to find and install the codecs would have provided links to purchase the add-ons or connect us with a Red Hat-supplied repository. Instead we are redirected through a chain of Fedora documentation until we come to a third-party website which currently does not offer the desired packages.

Ultimately, while RHEL does some things well, such as hardware support, desktop performance, and providing stable (if conservative) versions of applications, I found my trial highly frustrating. Many features simply do not work, or crash, or use a lot of resources, or need to be worked around to make RHEL function as a workstation distribution. Some people may correctly point out RHEL is mostly targeting servers rather than workstations, but there too there are a number of problems. Performance and stability are provided, but the issues I ran into with Cockpit, permission concerns, and command line package management are all hurdles for me when trying to run RHEL in a server role.

I find myself looking forward to the launch of CentOS 8 (which will probably arrive later this year), as CentOS 8 uses the same source code as RHEL, but is not tied to the same subscription model and package repositories. I am curious to see how much of a practical effect this has on the free, community version of the same software.

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Servers: SUSE, Red Hat/IBM and Kubernetes/Containers

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • SuSE storage spins-up Ceph

    Open source software platform company SuSE has announced SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, a software-defined storage solution powered by Ceph technology.

    Many would argue that storage on its own is snorage (i.e. enough to send you to sleep), but software -defined storage does at least drive us forward into the realm of the software developer.

    By way of a reminder, software -defined storage is a way of managing data storage resources and functionality that is essentially uncoupled from (i.e. has no underlying physical dependencies) the actual hardware resources that offer up the amount of storage being used.

  • IBM Open Sources Razee CD Tool to Support Mega Kubernetes Scaling

    IBM open sourced its Razee continuous delivery (CD) tool that allows developers to manage applications in their Kubernetes-based cluster deployments. The move also continues to bolster IBM’s push into the Kubernetes space.

    Razee consists of two parts: Kaptain, which are components that handle the multi-cluster deployments; and RazeeDash, which is basically the control panel.

    The Kaptain component within Razee provides a pull-based deployment model that supports self-updating clusters. This helps in generating inventory and scripts that describe actions for each cluster or each application running in a Kubernetes environment.

  • Red Hat Open Sources 3scale Code

    Red Hat has completed open sourcing the API management software of 3scale, the company it bought in June 2016 for an undisclosed sum, saying it has been working on the project for the past three years.

    The company’s full code base has been released under the permissive Apache Software License (ASL) 2.0 licence, with the open sourcing process “much more than throwing code over the wall”, Red Hat said.

    In a short post by the company’s David Codelli on Thursday, he noted: “When Red Hat acquires 3scale it was only a matter of time until it would be open sourced in some fashion. “But the process isn’t instantaneous.”

  • Digital Ocean’s Kubernetes service is now generally available

    Like any ambitious cloud infrastructure player, Digital Ocean also recently announced a solution for running Kubernetes  clusters on its platform. At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe in Barcelona, the company today announced that Digital Ocean Kubernetes is now generally available.

    With this release, the company is also bringing the latest Kubernetes release (1.14) to the platform, and developers who use the service will be able to schedule automatic patch version upgrades, too.

  • Serverless and containers: Two great technologies that work better together

    Cloud native models using containerized software in a continuous delivery approach could benefit from serverless computing where the cloud vendor generates the exact amount of resources required to run a workload on the fly. While the major cloud vendors have recognized this and are already creating products to abstract away the infrastructure, it may not work for every situation in spite of the benefits.

    Cloud native, put simply, involves using containerized applications and Kubernetes  to deliver software in small packages called microservices. This enables developers to build and deliver software faster and more efficiently in a continuous delivery model. In the cloud native world, you should be able to develop code once and run it anywhere, on prem or any public cloud, or at least that is the ideal.

Fedora 31 Planning To Upgrade To RPM 4.15 For Faster Builds, Other Improvements

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Red Hat

RPM 4.15 is due out this year as the latest RPM4 update and Fedora 31 is planning to make prompt use of RPM 4.15 given its new/improved features.

RPM 4.15 is expected to provide faster build performance, a dynamic build dependency generator, experimental chroot operations for non-root users, improved ARM detection, and a whole lot of fixes.

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More Fedora: Sirko Kemter: Khmer Translation Sprint 3

Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

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Linux
Red Hat

Fedora: Bodhi 4, Packit and More

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Red Hat
  • Bodhi 4.0.0 released

    After about 5 months of development time, the Fedora Infrastructure team has finally tagged Bodhi 4.0.0. This is a major release with many backwards incompatible changes, and results in a simpler codebase which should ease future development and maintenance.

  • Packit – auto-package your projects into Fedora

    Packit (https://packit.dev/) is a CLI tool that helps you auto-package your upstream projects into the Fedora operating system. But what does it really mean?

    As a developer, you might want to add or update your package in Fedora. If you’ve done it in the past, you know it’s no easy task. If you haven’t let me reiterate: it’s no easy task.

    And this is exactly where packit can help: with just one configuration file in your upstream repository, packit will automatically package your software into Fedora and update it when you update your source code upstream.

    Furthermore, packit can synchronize downstream changes to a SPEC file back into the upstream repository. This could be useful if the SPEC file of your package is changed in Fedora repositories and you would like to synchronize it into your upstream project.

    Packit also provides a way to build an SRPM package based on an upstream repository checkout, which can be used for building RPM packages in COPR.

    Last but not least, packit provides a status command. This command provides information about upstream and downstream repositories, like pull requests, release and more others.

    Packit provides also another two commands: build and create-update.

  • Niharika and Divyansh: Improving modular packages and container security

    This post is the fourth and final introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Niharika Shrivastava and Divyansh Kamboj, who are working on projects to improve Fedora module metadata and add additional security hardening to containers, respectively.

  • [Fedora] FPgM report: 2019-21

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

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More in Tux Machines

Arc Menu Extension Now Lets You Pin Your Fave Apps to the Sidebar

If you’re a fan of the Arc menu extension for GNOME Shell you may be interested to hear that an update is on the way. A new version of the traditional-style app menu, which is particularly popular with Dash to Panel users, is currently pending approval over the GNOME Extensions website. What does it bring? Personalisation. Arc Menu replaces the full-screen app launcher in GNOME Shell with a more traditional ‘start menu’ design. It’s searchable, has bookmarks for important folders, shortcuts for key system actions, and lets you manage your session. It also lets you browse installed applications based one their category. The whole of the left-hand sidebar is dedicated to this purpose. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, Test and Code, LINUX Unplugged

Security: Mozilla Patch for Firefox and Getting Started with OpenSSL

  • Zero-Day Flaw In Firefox Is Getting Exploited By Hackers; Update Now!
    Mozilla has issued a warning of a zero-day flaw in Firefox browser that is currently being exploited in the wild. But the good news is that an emergency patch has been released for the same so you should update your browser now! The vulnerability was discovered by Google’s Project Zero security team...
  • Security vulnerabilities fixed in Firefox 67.0.3 and Firefox ESR 60.7.1
    A type confusion vulnerability can occur when manipulating JavaScript objects due to issues in Array.pop. This can allow for an exploitable crash. We are aware of targeted attacks in the wild abusing this flaw.
  • Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics
    This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries. The two articles in this series cover—collectively—cryptographic hashes, digital signatures, encryption and decryption, and digital certificates. You can find the code and command-line examples in a ZIP file from my website. Let’s start with a review of the SSL in the OpenSSL name.

Python: Leading, Developing for Android and New RCs

  • Leading in the Python community
    Naomi began her career in the Classics; she earned a PhD in Latin and Ancient Greek with a minor in Indo-European Linguistics, as she says, "several decades ago." While teaching Latin at a private school, she began tinkering with computers, learning to code and to take machines apart to do upgrades and repairs. She started working with open source software in 1995 with Yggdrasil Linux and helped launch the Fort Wayne, Indiana, Linux User Group.
  • What’s the Best Language for Android App Developers: Java or Python?
    Few things can be so divisive among developers as their choice of programming languages. Developers will promote one over the other, often touting their chosen language’s purity, speed, elegance, efficiency, power, portability, compatibility or any number of other features. Android app developers are no exception, with many developers divided between using Java or Python to develop their applications. Let’s look at these two languages and see which is best for Android app developers.
  • Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available
    Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available. 3.7.4rc1 is the release preview of the next maintenance release of Python 3.7, the latest feature release of Python. 3.6.9rc1 is the release preview of the first security-fix release of Python 3.6. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-06-28, no code changes are planned between these release candidates and the final releases. These release candidates are intended to give you the opportunity to test the new security and bug fixes in 3.7.4 and security fixes in 3.6.9. We strongly encourage you to test your projects and report issues found to bugs.python.org as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that these are preview releases and, thus, their use is not recommended for production environments.