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Red Hat

Fedora: Google Code-in, Python and NeuroFedora

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: GCI 2018 mentor’s summit @ Google headquarters

    Google Code-in is a contest to introduce students (ages 13-17) to open source software development. Since 2010, 8,108 students from 107 countries have completed over 40,100 open source tasks Because Google Code-in is often the first experience many students have with open source, the contest is designed to make it easy for students to jump right in. I was one of the mentors in this first time for Fedora program. We had 125 students participating in Fedora and the top 3 students completed 26, 25 and 22 tasks each.

    Every year Google invites the Grand-Prize winners and their parents, and a mentor to it’s headquarters in San Francisco, California for a 4 days trip. I was offered the opportunity to go and represent Fedora in the summit and meet these 2 brilliant folks in person. This report covers activities and other things that happened there.

  • Fedora mulls its "python" version

    There is no doubt that the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 has been a difficult one, but Linux distributions have been particularly hard hit. For many people, that transition is largely over; Python 2 will be retired at the end of this year, at least by the core development team. But distributions will have to support Python 2 for quite a while after that. As part of any transition, the version that gets run from the python binary (or symbolic link) is something that needs to be worked out. Fedora is currently discussing what to do about that for Fedora 31.

    Fedora program manager Ben Cotton posted a proposal to make python invoke Python 3 in Fedora 31 to the Fedora devel mailing list. The proposal, titled "Python means Python 3", is also on the Fedora wiki. The idea is that wherever "python" is used it will refer to version 3, including when it is installed by DNF (i.e. dnf install python) or when Python packages are installed, so installing "python-requests" will install the Python 3 version of the Requests library. In addition, a wide array of associated tools (e.g. pip, pylint, idle, and flask) will also use the Python 3 versions.

    The "Requests" link above does point to a potential problem area, however. It shows that Requests for Python 3 III is not fully finished, with an expected release sometime "before PyCon 2020" (mid-April 2020), which is well after the expected October 2019 release of Fedora 31. The distribution already has a python3-requests package, though, so that will be picked up as python-requests in Fedora 31 if this proposal is adopted. There may be other packages out there where Python 3 support is not complete but, at this point, most of the major libraries have converted.

  • NeuroFedora poster at CNS*2019

    With CNS*2019 around the corner, we worked on getting the NeuroFedora poster ready for the poster presentation session. Our poster is P96, on the first poster session on the 14th of July.

    [...]

    Unfortunately, this time, no one from the team is able to attend the conference, but if you are there and want to learn more about NeuroFedora, please get in touch with us using any of our communication channels.

    To everyone that will be in Barcelona for the conference, we hope you have a fruitful one, and of course, we hope you are able to make some time to rest at the beach too.

Fedora: Cockpit 198, EPEL, and Fedora Community Departure

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Red Hat
  • Cockpit 198

    Cockpit has been restyled to match the PatternFly 4 User Interface design, including the Red Hat Text and Display fonts.

    This style refresh aligns Cockpit with other web user interfaces that use PatternFly, such as OpenShift 4.

    Over time, Cockpit will be ported to actually use PatternFly 4 widgets, but this restyle allows us to change Cockpit gradually.

  • The State Of EPEL-8 For Complementing RHEL8's Packages

    Under the Fedora umbrella has been the "Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux" to complement the official RHEL packages with extra packages largely based on Fedora packages. While RHEL 8.0 launched in May, there hasn't been full support for EPEL-8 yet but it's being worked on.

    Due to the many changes from RHEL7 to RHEL8, the EPEL-8 support has been slow. The EPEL-8 bring-up is being done via a multi-phase roll-out.

  • Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator (FCAIC)

    I’ve decided to move on from my role as the Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator (FCAIC). This was not an easy decision to make. I am proud of the work I have done in Fedora over the last three years and I think I have helped the community move past many challenges. I could NEVER have done all of this without the support and assistance of the community!

    As some of you know, I have been covering for some other roles in Red Hat for almost the last year. Some of these tasks have led to some opportunities to take my career in a different direction. I am going to remain at Red Hat and on the same team with the same manager, but with a slightly expanded scope of duties. I will no longer be day-to-day on Fedora and will instead be in a consultative role as a Community Architect at Large. This is a fancy way of saying that I will be tackling helping lots of projects with various issues while also working on some specific strategic objectives.

Canonical and IBM/Red Hat Strategy on Servers

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Red Hat
Server
Ubuntu
  • Inside the Canonical Container Strategy

    Canonical continues to pursue a somewhat bifurcated approach to containers by announcing support for Kubernetes 1.15 while continuing to advance Snaps as an application container that enables software deployment via a single click.

    For example, Canonical recently announced in collaboration with DJI that Snaps will be supported on an instance of Ubuntu embedded in Manifold 2 drones manufactured by DJI. While that approach will make it easier to deploy containerized applications on a type of embedded system, Snaps—for the moment, at least—mostly only runs on Ubuntu.

    Docker, in contrast, provides what Canonical describes as “process containers,” which typically are immutable and share some libraries across all containers in execution. Docker registries are optional and typically contain a loose collection of Docker images identifiable by hash or tags. That approach makes it possible to run containerized applications across multiple operating systems. However, within organizations that have standardized on Ubuntu, Canonical is making the case for an application container in the form of Snaps.

    Canonical is trying to drum up support for Snaps on multiple distributions of Linux with mixed success. Most recently, it made available Snapd, a service that individual developers can employ to run Snaps on other Linux distributions. Support for Snaps running on Linux distributions other than Ubuntu generally is limited to what’s provided by Canonical, which tends to limit enthusiasm. It’s also worth noting that alternative application packaging technologies in the form of AppImage and Flatpak have been around longer than Snaps.

  • CEO Ginni Rometty: Red Hat's open-source software 'is a play that helps all of IBM'

    IBM on Tuesday closed on its $34 billion cash acquisition of Red Hat.

Leftovers: OpenSUSE, SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition Winner

    The votes are in and the openSUSE Project is happy to announce that the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 logo competition winner is Hervy Qurrotul from Indonesia. Congratulations Hervy! As the winner, Hervy will receive a “mystery box” from the committee.

    On this logo competition, we have 18 submissions from all over the world. All the designs are great. This logo competition is voted by openSUSE.Asia Committee and Local Team. Thank you for your vote.

  • Cloud Application Platform vs Container as a Service vs VM hosted application

    In the “old days,” applications were always hosted in a traditional way on a physical server or a group of physical servers. However, physical servers are expensive, hard to maintain and hard to grow and scale. That’s when virtual machines (VM) grew in popularity. VMs provided a better way to maintain, grow and scale. That is, they were easier to backup and restore and migrate from one region to another and they were easier to replicate across multiple domains/zones/regions.

  • Sysadmin vs SRE: What's the difference?

    In the IT world, there has always been a pull between generalist and specialist. The stereotypical sysadmin falls in the generalist category 99 times out of 100. The site reliability engineer (SRE) role is specialized, however, and grew out of the needs of one of the first companies to know real scale: Google. Ultimately, these two roles have the same goal for the applications whose infrastructure they operate: providing a good experience for the applications’ consumers. Yet, these roles have drastically different starting points.

Red Hat's Statements on Being Bought by IBM (Now Official)

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Red Hat
Server
  • Unlocking the true potential of hybrid cloud with Red Hat partners

    Today, we announced that IBM’s landmark acquisition of Red Hat has closed and shared our vision for how our two companies will move forward together.

    You’ve heard that IBM is committed to preserving Red Hat’s independence, neutrality, culture and industry partnerships, and that Red Hat’s unwavering commitment to open source remains unchanged.

    There is a key part of that statement I want to focus on—partnerships.

    IBM has made a significant investment to acquire Red Hat, and respects that Red Hat wouldn’t be Red Hat without our partner ecosystem. Partners open more doors for open source than we can alone and are vital to our success.

  • Red Hat and IBM: Accelerating the adoption of open source

    Today, IBM finalized its acquisition of Red Hat. Moving forward, Red Hat will operate as a distinct unit within IBM, and I couldn't be more excited—not only for what today represents in the history of two storied technology companies, but what it means for the future of the industry, for our customers, and for open source.

    Red Hat's acquisition by IBM represents an unparalleled milestone for open source itself. It signals validation of community-driven innovation and the value that open source brings to users.

  • IBM Closes Landmark Acquisition of Red Hat for $34 Billion; Defines Open, Hybrid Cloud Future

    IBM (NYSE:IBM) and Red Hat announced today that they have closed the transaction under which IBM acquired all of the issued and outstanding common shares of Red Hat for $190.00 per share in cash, representing a total equity value of approximately $34 billion.

    The acquisition redefines the cloud market for business. Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud technologies are now paired with the unmatched scale and depth of IBM’s innovation and industry expertise, and sales leadership in more than 175 countries. Together, IBM and Red Hat will accelerate innovation by offering a next-generation hybrid multicloud platform. Based on open source technologies, such as Linux and Kubernetes, the platform will allow businesses to securely deploy, run and manage data and applications on-premises and on private and multiple public clouds.

  • Q&A: IBM’s Landmark Acquisition of Red Hat

    Paul: Red Hat is an enterprise software company with an open source development model. A fundamental tenet of that model is that everything we do, from new practices that we learn to new technologies that we develop, goes back to the upstream community. By joining forces with IBM, our reach into customers will dramatically increase so we’ll be in a position to drive open enterprise technology a lot further. As for IBM, we’ve been partners for quite some time, but now existing IBM customers will have even more direct access to next-generation open source-based technologies that are at the cornerstone of hybrid cloud innovation.

  • Jim Whitehurst email to Red Hatters on Red Hat + IBM acquisition closing

    Last October, we announced our intention to join forces with IBM, with the aim of becoming the world’s top hybrid cloud provider. Since then, the promise IBM chairman, president, and CEO Ginni Rometty and I made has not changed. In fact, our commitment to that vision has grown - Red Hat will remain a distinct unit in IBM as we work to help customers deliver any app, anywhere, realizing the true value of the hybrid cloud. This morning, we can share that the most significant tech acquisition of 2019 has officially closed and we can now begin moving forward.

    We will be hosting an all-hands company meeting today (Tuesday, July 9) where you will hear from me, Ginni, Paul Cormier and IBM senior vice president of Cloud and Cognitive Software, Arvind Krishna. Details on logistics to follow; I hope you will join us.

    Since we announced the acquisition, I’ve been having conversations with our customers, partners, open source community members and more Red Hatters than I can count (I’ve been following memo-list as well!). What struck me most from those conversations was the passion. It’s passion not just for a company, but for what we do and how we do it—the open source way. That’s not going to change.

  • IBM Acquires Red Hat For $34 Billion

    IBM today closed the acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion, marking one of the biggest acquisition of any open source company.

CentOS 8.0 Completed Its Initial Build Loop

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Red Hat

It looks like CentOS 8 as the "community" version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 is still a few weeks away, but good progress is being made.

In their July newsletter for CentOS, they still anticipate the release coming within "the next month or two."

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Fedora, CentOS and Red Hat Cloudwashing

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Red Hat
  • A Closer Look at Fedora Projects

    The Fedora Project is a community of people working together to build free and open source software platform and to collaborate on and share user-focused solutions built on that platform. It makes an operating system and make it easy for people to do useful stuff with it.
    Actually, they produce several operating systems, or editions. The one that new contributors are most likely to be interested in, and focused on, is Fedora Workstation. Fedora Workstation has a wide range of software that’s suitable for almost anyone. All of the software provided with Fedora is open source and free to download and use.

  • CWS : Complete guide to install CentOS Web Panel

    Centos Web Panel is a free web hosting tool that provides a GUI for quick & easy management of the of servers, both VPS & Dedicated, with minimum efforts. Its available to install & use on RPM based distributions, like CentOS, RHEL etc.

    Centos Web Panel comes with lots for features & services, it automatically installs LAMP stack along wth varnish cache. Some other features & services are ,

  • Introduction to cloud-native application environment architecture

    Cloud-native environment architecture can be challenging to understand. To help make sense of it for application developers and software/system architects,  I will attempt to explain the various parts and how they work together. Toward this end, I find it helpful to think about the architecture in four separate layers: application software development, service scaling, application network, and container orchestration platform.

    In this article, I will describe the first technology layer: application software development. I drew the following diagram to make these concepts easier to visualize.

Red Hat's New OpenShift on OpenStack Reference Architecture and Fedora Outsourcing Code/Hosting to Microsoft Again

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Red Hat
  • New OpenShift on OpenStack Reference Architecture

    Large IT organizations are increasingly looking to develop innovative software applications in hybrid and multi clouds architectures. A lot of these applications have to be developed and deployed in an on-premises private cloud for various reasons (e.g. security and compliance, data affinity, performance, etc.). This private cloud should be simple, agile, flexible, secure, cost efficient, and a key part of their overall Hybrid and Multi cloud architecture.

  • Packit-as-a-Service is now live!

    Using the Packit service in your upstream projects helps you continuously ensure that your projects work in Fedora OS. Just add one config file [3] to your repository, along with the RPM spec file and you're almost there. We have started publishing docs for the service over here [4].

  • Red Hat Introduces "Packit-as-a-Service" For Fedora

    Packit-as-a-Service has been announced as a GitHub integration app and leveraging the Packit project to provide for upstream CI testing to ensure different software projects continue to build and function fine on Fedora Linux. 

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • How to explain service mesh in plain English

    In short, service mesh tools like Istio can reduce the operational burden of managing microservices-based applications, and in particular traffic between services, which could otherwise involve significant and often unsustainable manual work.

    As Red Hat CTO Chris Wright wrote earlier this year, “Alongside serverless, we see the service mesh concept taking off. A service mesh is essentially platform-level automation for creating the network connectivity required by microservices-based software architectures.”

    That’s a good, concise definition. We asked a variety of other IT leaders and practitioners to share their own clear-cut definitions to help boost your service mesh IQ, in part because it’s likely to come up in more discussions around containers, microservices, hybrid cloud, and other topics.

    Let’s start with some quick definitions:

  • How to write a sysadmin job description
  • Update on EPEL-8 Status

    EPEL packages are built inside of the Fedora Projects’ build infrastructure. This is done by downloading the packages from Red Hat’s public Content Delivery Network (CDN), and then having the Fedora artifact build system (koji) use the release as an external build channel. Koji looks at packages in a different way than other build commands like ‘mock’ do. Where mock is meant to just build packages, koji is designed about auditing the entire lifecycle of a package. In other words, if you want to know how a package in Fedora 12 was built and all its children interacted over time in the buildroots… you can do that with enough work and the koji databases. With mock you have a couple of log files which tell you what was pulled into a buildroot but how those were built would require you finding their log files, etc etc. A developer can also download those packages and look at them to see what was in them and how they were built.

    The strength of koji is that you can have a credible chain of builds to know where things came from. However this doesn’t work too well with building packages for EPEL where koji doesn’t know where the RHEL kernel came from. Koji uses mergerepo to look at the external packages provided, determines the src.rpm they would come from and determines what the latest version it would use from each. From this it creates a ‘buildroot’ which it will use to build packages from. This has worked pretty well for building packages from RHEL-5,6, and 7. The major downside has been where someone built a package with the same src.rpm name which koji then decides is the master no matter if a newer version shows up in RHEL.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-26

EU approves IBM's $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat

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Red Hat

The European Commission has unconditionally approved IBM's $34 billion takeover of open-source software maker Red Hat.

In a statement, the European Commission said that following an investigation, it concluded that the proposed deal "would raise no competition concerns".

Since IBM doesn't stand among the top two companies in the cloud computing market, and isn't dominant in any sector in which Red Hat is also present, there was no reason for regulators to believe that the merger would raise competition concerns.

"During its investigation, the Commission assessed the impact of the proposed transaction on the markets for middleware and system infrastructure software, where the activities of IBM and Red Hat overlap," the Commission said in its statement.

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OSS Leftovers

  • How open source is benefitting SUSE, its channel partners and customers

    Open source technology is being talked about even more rampantly today. Phillip Cockrell, Vice President of Global Channels, SUSE articulates, “More than anything, open source is the core of innovation. It is by all and for all and propelling all aspects of technology development today.” SUSE, a native open source software company, which provides reliable, software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that give organisations greater control and flexibility, is a seasoned 25-year-old player in the domain.

  • What is AOSP? Android Open Source Project, the ‘Android without Google’

    AOSP is the acronym for Android Open Supply Challenge ; that’s, ‘Android Open Source Project’. So it's simply the supply code of Android, the cellular working system of the Mountain View firm. However what’s it for? Its fundamental software is by OEMs; cellular producers obtain AOSP and make their 'ROM inventory', but additionally serves as the premise for customized ROMs and forks. AOSP, or Android Open Supply Challenge, isn’t the identical as Android Inventory . Whereas AOSP is the supply code of the working system, Android Inventory is the 'pure model' with out bloatware of any sort and solely with apps and Google providers, in addition to the native launcher. AOSP, nevertheless, is the premise of Android Vanilla , which is the model that’s distributed to smartphone producers and is topic to modifications. On it, the producer's personal purposes and providers are launched, and naturally the customization layer and the variations which can be essential for particular elements to work.

  • How to Avoid Technical Debt in Open Source Projects
  • Introducing OpenDrop, an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python

    A group of German researchers recently published a paper “A Billion Open Interfaces for Eve and Mallory: MitM, DoS, and Tracking Attacks on iOS and macOS Through Apple Wireless Direct Link”, at the 28th USENIX Security Symposium (August 14–16), USA. The paper reveals security and privacy vulnerabilities in Apple’s AirDrop file-sharing service as well as denial-of-service (DoS) attacks which leads to privacy leaks or simultaneous crashing of all neighboring devices. As part of the research, Milan Stute and Alexander Heinrich, two researchers have developed an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python – OpenDrop. OpenDrop is like a FOSS implementation of AirDrop. It is an experimental software and is the result of reverse engineering efforts by the Open Wireless Link project (OWL). It is compatible with Apple AirDrop and used for sharing files among Apple devices such as iOS and macOS or on Linux systems running an open re-implementation of Apple Wireless Direct Link (AWDL).

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source Storage Solutions

    In this article we will examine free and open source storage solutions by providing a brief overview of what to expect, as well as blurbs on each tool.

  • Open Source Origination Technology Platform for Online Lenders

    DigiFi was founded by Joshua Jersey and Bradley Vanderstarren in 2014. It started its life as Promise Financial, an online lender, and raised $110 million in credit capital. It built up its own proprietary tech as there was no solution provider in 2014 offering an end-to-end loan origination platform that could automate the entire process. They sold off the tech to a large lending institution in 2017 and pivoted to DigiFi, one of the world’s first open source loan origination systems (LOS) which equips the lenders with flexible and modern tools to create unique platforms and digital experiences.

  • IT favors open source networking over Cisco ACI, VMware NSX

    Companies trying to avoid or lessen the use of expensive network automation software from Cisco and VMware are turning to open source tools that are often good enough for many tasks associated with managing complex modern networks. Cisco's application-centric infrastructure (ACI) and VMware's NSX are powerful technologies for operating networks built on the vendors' respective products. But many large enterprises have data centers filled with perfectly good multivendor hardware and software that very few organizations are willing to swap for an all Cisco or VMware alternative. Therefore, companies are turning to open source networking products, such as Ansible, Chef, Puppet and SaltStack, for automating many network-related chores across as much of the data center as possible, while relegating ACI and NSX to Cisco- or VMware-only portions of the network.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Open Source Software Licensing

    With the next waves of technological change, such as autonomous vehicles, blockchain, and IoT, newer, more complex OSS licenses may be drafted, and argued in the courts, to protect the interests of software innovators and the OSS community.

Open Data: Schlumberger and Waymo

  • Schlumberger open-sources data ecosystem, contributing to industrywide data development
  • Schlumberger Open Sources Data Ecosystem

    Oilfield services company Schlumberger said it will open source its data ecosystem and contribute to The Open Group Open Subsurface Data Universe (OSDU) Forum to accelerate the delivery of the OSDU Data Platform. The OSDU Forum is an international forum of oil and gas operators, cloud services companies, technology providers, suppliers of applications to oil and gas operators, academia and other standards organizations working together to develop an open, standards-based, data platform that will bring together exploration, development and wells data.

  • Waymo open-sources data set for autonomous vehicle multimodal sensors

    Waymo, the Alphabet subsidiary that hopes to someday pepper roads with self-driving taxis, today pulled back the curtains on a portion of the data used to train the algorithms underpinning its cars: The Waymo Open Dataset. Waymo principal scientist Dragomir Anguelov claims it’s the largest multimodal sensor sample corpus for autonomous driving released to date. “[W]e are inviting the research community to join us with the [debut] of the Waymo Open Dataset, [which is composed] of high-resolution sensor data collected by Waymo self-driving vehicles,” wrote Anguelov in a blog post published this morning. “Data is a critical ingredient for machine learning … [and] this rich and diverse set of real-world experiences has helped our engineers and researchers develop Waymo’s self-driving technology and innovative models and algorithms.”

Linux Foundation: Open Mainframe, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, IBM and More

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