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Red Hat

Red Hat Satellite 6.6 Beta is now available with enhancements across reporting, automation, and supportability

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Red Hat

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat Satellite 6.6 is now available in beta to current Satellite customers.

Red Hat Satellite is a scalable platform to manage patching, provisioning, and subscription management of your Red Hat infrastructure, regardless of where it is running. The Satellite 6.6 beta is focused on enhancements across reporting, automation, and supportability

While Satellite 6.6 Beta supports Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 hosts, it is important to note that Satellite 6.6 must be installed on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 host. Support for running Satellite itself on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 host is scheduled for a later release.

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Also: Serverless on Kubernetes, diverse automation, and more industry trends

IBM: OpenPOWER Foundation, Savings and the OpenStack Platform

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Red Hat
Hardware
  • OpenPOWER Foundation | The Next Step in the OpenPOWER Foundation Journey

    Today marks one of the most important days in the life of the OpenPOWER Foundation. With IBM announcing new contributions to the open source community including the POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and key hardware reference designs at OpenPOWER Summit North America 2019, the future has never looked brighter for the POWER architecture.

    OpenPOWER Foundation Aligns with Linux Foundation

    The OpenPOWER Foundation will now join projects and organizations like OpenBMC, CHIPS Alliance, OpenHPC and so many others within the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation is the premier open source group, and we’re excited to be working more closely with them.

    Since our founding in 2013, IEEE-ISTO has been our home, and we owe so much to its team. It’s as a result of IEEE-ISTO’s support and guidance that we’ve been able to expand to more than 350 members and that we’re ready to take the next step in our evolution. On behalf of our membership, our board of directors and myself, we place on record our thanks to the IEEE-ISTO team.

    By moving the POWER ISA under an open model – guided by the OpenPOWER Foundation within the Linux Foundation – and making it available to the growing open technical commons, we’ll enable innovation in the open hardware and software space to grow at an accelerated pace. The possibilities for what organizations and individuals will be able to develop on POWER through its mature ISA and software ecosystem will be nearly limitless.

  • How Red Hat delivers $7B in customer savings

    This spring, Red Hat commissioned IDC to conduct a new study to analyze the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux to the global business economy. While many of the findings were impressive, including immense opportunities for partners, we were especially excited to learn more about how our customers benefit from Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    According to the study, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform "touches" more than $10 trillion of business revenues worldwide each year and provides economic benefits of more than $1 trillion each year to customers. Nearly $7 billion of that number comes in the form of IT savings. Even more exciting? As hybrid cloud adoption grows, we expect customers to continue to benefit given the importance of a common, flexible and open operating system to IT deployments that span the many footprints of enterprise computing.

  • The road ahead for the Red Hat OpenStack Platform

    If you didn't have a chance to attend our Road Ahead session at Red Hat Summit 2019 (or you did, but want a refresher) you'll want to read on for a quick update. We'll cover where Red Hat OpenStack Platform is today, where we're planning to go tomorrow, and the longer-term plan for Red Hat OpenStack Platform support all the way to 2025.

    A strategic part of our portfolio

    Red Hat OpenStack Platform is a strategic part of Red Hat's vision for open hybrid cloud. It's the on-prem foundation that can help organizations bridge the gap between today's existing workloads and emerging workloads. In fact, it just earned the 2019 CODiE award for "Best Software Defined Infrastructure."

    One of those emerging workloads, and more on the rest in a moment, is Red Hat OpenShift.

Is Fedora Linux a Good Distro? The 15 Best Reasons to Use Fedora Linux

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Red Hat

It goes without saying that Fedora Linux is one of the best Linux distributions and significantly distinct with its properties. There is no denying that it is an enticing version of Linux and there are enough reasons to be lured with the Fedora. It offers far ranges of features that have made it an undeniable choice for the users. There is a close and intimate collaboration between Fedora and “Redhat” what has given a new dimension of this Linux version. It is more comfortable to use, user-friendly and latest technology oriented; thus, there are many obvious reasons for loving in it.

[...]

The various distribution of Linux system is recognized for easy-going properties, albeit Fedora is the easiest one in this context. Having an easier interface, users are capable of dealing with it very easily since the boot phase. When the boot is done, users will be guided with simple features to run it the way they desire.

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Fedora: Dropping i686 and Flock Reports

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Red Hat
  • Approved: Fedora 31 To Drop i686 Everything/Modular Repositories

    The month-old proposal for the upcoming Fedora 31 Linux distribution release to stop with their i686 repositories for Everything and Modules was voted on today by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee.

    The FESCo group gave their formal approval today for permitting these i686 repositories to be removed beginning with Fedora 31. This also goes in-step with Fedora 31 having already decided to stop with their i686 kernel builds.

  • Living my best 4 days: Flock to Fedora 2019

    Months of waiting came to an end and finally, it was time to meet people with whom I have been working for the last 4 months, being on the other side of the screen. Things seemed different when our last Wednesday conference call ended with “Meet you soon” instead of a “Good Day”. The excitement of attending Flock to Fedora, was not only because the virtual interaction is turning to the real meeting but also, it was my first ever International trip. With approaching the 6th of August, the fear of travelling solo was getting on the peak, and at one moment I started questioning if all the trouble I underwent during last month was even worth it. But the time I met Shraddha(another intern working on the same project)at Bangalore airport, we happened to click so much at our first conversation that it was certain that at least my journey will not be me, and my headphones all the time.

    Since I reached Budapest a day before when everyone arrived, I got a handful of time discovering places, getting to know their culture and try on things we never tried before. The excitement of being at such a beautiful place did not make me realise that I was sleep-deprived, I had a jet lag of 4 hours and I was hungry. I spent the entire day roaming the streets, enjoying a breath of fresh air and exploring the city and ways of commute as well.

    Next day we shifted to the hotel that was booked for us and where the conference will be held. The ambience of the whole place was really nice and we met other fellow attendees at the conference.

  • rpminspect Presentation at Flock 2019

    Flock in Budapest was a great event. There were a lot of talks I wanted to attend, but could not make it to all of them. I did give one talk on my project called rpminspect.

    rpminspect is a project I started as a replacement for an internal Red Hat tool. I am working on integrating it in to the build workflow for Fedora but also allow package maintainers to use it locally as a build linter of sorts. Here is a link to the presentation I gave. I think there is video, but I am not sure where those are.

Red Hat: New PHP Builds, End-to-End Encryption for Kubernetes Applications, Interns

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Red Hat
  • PHP version 7.2.22RC1 and 7.3.9RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.9RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 28-29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.22RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Self-Serviced, End-to-End Encryption for Kubernetes Applications, Part 2: a Practical Example

    In part one of this series, we saw three approaches to fully automate the provisioning of certificates and create end-to-end encryption. Based on feedback from the community suggesting the post was a bit too theoretical and not immediately actionable, this article will illustrate a practical example. You can see a recording of the demo here.

  • The Tiger that interned at Red Hat

    From the start, Tiger just had the right idea about looking for a college. Instead of reading US World News’ rankings, basing his decisions on sports teams, or even aiming for the Ivy Leagues, Tiger set out to make his college search a data driven effort. He asked himself, first, where he wanted to work. For him, that was an almost typical answer for an aspiring young technology student: Google, Facebook, Red Hat and other big name tech firms.

    [...]

    Tiger's real name is Passawit Kaovilai, and he's now entering his third year at NC State. He said that many people in his native Thailand have nicknames, and that his translates well into any language, and is understood immediately. He was also born in the year of the tiger, so the name is a natural fit.

    Here at Red Hat, Tiger has taken on the duties of a technical marketing intern. That means he's been diving into Red Hat OpenShift 4 to help create documentation and learning tools for users in the field. That also means contributing to open source projects, and getting his handle out there on GitHub, however modestly.

Fedora and Red Hat: New F30 Builds, Flock Report, Servers and Package Management Domain Model

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Red Hat
Server
  • Ben Williams: F30-20190818 updated isos released.

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F30-20190816 Live ISOs, carrying the 5.2.8-200 kernel.

    This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have 1.2GB of updates)).

    A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, satellite,Southern-Gentlem for testing these iso.

  • Flock to Fedora 2019 Conference report

    Last week I attended “Flock to Fedora” conference in Budapest, Hungary. It was a Fedora contributors conference where I met some developers, project leaders, GSoC interns. Below is a brief report of my attendance.

  • What salary can a sysadmin expect to earn?

    The path to reliable salary data sometimes is sometimes paved with frustration. That’s because the honest answer to a reasonable question—what should I be paid for this job?—is usually: "It depends."

    Location, experience, skill set, industry, and other factors all impact someone’s actual compensation. For example, there’s rarely a single, agreed-upon salary for a particular job title or role.

    All of the above applies to system administrators. It’s a common, long-established IT job that spans many industries, company sizes, and other variables. While sysadmins may share some common fundamentals, it’s certainly not a one-size-fits-all position, and it’s all the truer as some sysadmin roles evolve to take on cloud, DevOps, and other responsibilities.

    What salary can you expect to earn as a sysadmin? Yeah, it depends. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t get a clear picture of what sysadmin compensation looks like, including specific numbers. This is information worth having handy if you’re a sysadmin on the job market or seeking a promotion.

    Let’s start with some good news from a compensation standpoint. Sysadmins—like other IT pros these days—are in demand.

    "In today’s business environment, companies are innovating and moving faster than ever before, and they need systems that can keep up with the pace of their projects and communications, as well as help everything run smoothly," says Robert Sutton, district president for the recruiting firm Robert Half Technology. "That’s why systems administrators are among the IT professionals who can expect to see a growing salary over the next year or so."

  • Run Mixed IT Efficiently, The Adient – SUSE Way.

    When you have multiple distributions, such as Red Hat and SUSE, you can reduce administration complexity and save administration time and resources with a common management tool. Adient had applications running on both SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Adient deployed SUSE Manager to manage their Mixed IT environment involving both distributions.

  • Package Management Domain Model

    When I wrote this model, we were trying to unify a few different sorts of packages. Coming from SpaceWalk, part of the team was used to wokring on RPMS with the RPM Database for storage, and Yum as the mechanism for fetching them. The other part of the team was coming from the JBoss side, working with JAR, WAR, EAR and associated files, and the Ivy or Maven building and fetching the files.

    We were working within the context of the Red Hat Network (as it was then called) for delivering content to subscribers. Thus, we had the concept of Errata, Channels, and Entitlements which are somewhat different from what other organizations call these things, but the concepts should be general enough to cover a range of systems.

    There are many gaps in this diagram. It does not discuss the building of packages, nor the relationship between source and binary packages. It also does not provide a way to distinguish between the package storage system and the package fetch mechanism.

    But the bones are solid. I’ve used this diagram for a few years, and it is useful.

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

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Red Hat

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test.

All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere.

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Latest Reports on Fedora's Flock in Budapest, Hungary

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Red Hat
  • Flock 2019 - Budapest, Hungery : Internationalization, Localization and Testing

    I am one of the lucky person who has got an opportunity to consistently participate in amazing Fedora community to drive innovation in free and open source way. This was my 5th flock after 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018. Indeed, it's great to see how many things has been changed in technology space. Values of Fedora still remains the same, Freedom, Friends, Features and First !!

    For me the highlight talks was Denise Dumas on "Fedora, Red Hat and IBM". She very well explained how Fedora and Fedora community is very very important to Red Hat and it will remain the same even after acquisition.

    Other than that i also attended all talks from Brendan Conoboy. He nicely explained on RHEL-8 planning side stuff.

  • Flock Fedora Conference 2019

    I attended the annual Fedora Flock conference this year at Budapest, and has been one of the most productive conferences so far. Here is a brief trip report.

IBM/Red Hat: RHELvolution, Command Line Heroes, Eclipse and OpenShift

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Red Hat
  • RHELvolution: A brief history of Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases from early days to RHEL 5

    The launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8) at Red Hat Summit 2019 was a jubilant event. Not only for the many team members around the world who worked to make the next-generation of the world?s leading enterprise Linux platform a reality, but also for customers who are excited to utilize its new capabilities in driving business innovation.

    This is a great time to reflect on what is so special about RHEL 8 by taking a walk through time on the evolution of RHEL. The RHELvolution, if you will. I'll be your guide on this journey, having been at the helm for RHEL engineering since the beginning (2001), starting with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1. And yes, we'll explain why it started with 2.1.

    It has been thrilling to be part of the RHEL team all these years. Having worked on proprietary UNIX operating systems before being at Red Hat, constructing RHEL offered a first hand view of the power of open source. Through collaboration with customers, community and a highly motivated team, we have had a global impact on the IT landscape. Evolving from "lighting up the box" to dynamic infrastructure that helps to advance the state of the art while liberating customers from vendor lock-in (originally at the hardware level, later expanded to hybrid cloud).

  • Command Line Heroes season 3 episode 4: Diving for Perl
  • How Developers Can Survive the Last Mile with CodeReady Workspaces

    As a way to piece together this explosion of available open source tools into simple and coherent single interface for cloud native deployments, the Eclipse Foundation offers the Eclipse Che integrated development environment (IDE).

    Today’s often desperate need for Eclipse Che can be traced back to the evolution of open source tools during the past 10 years. Not only have these tools been evolving, but in many cases, they have been outright created from scratch. That’s posed a bit of a problem for those out on the cutting edge of scalable microservices as the stable infrastructure components of old gave way to a hodgepodge of brand new open source and commercial products and tools.

    Inside each cloud provider, a host of tools can address CI/CD, testing, monitoring, backing up and recovery problems. Outside of those providers, the cloud native community has been hard at work cranking out new tooling from Prometheus, Knative, Envoy and Fluentd, to Kubenetes itself and the expanding ecosystem of Kubernetes Operators.

    Within all of those projects, cloud-based services and desktop utilities is one major gap, however: the last mile of software development is the IDE. And despite the wealth of development projects inside the community and Cloud Native Computing Foundation, it is indeed the Eclipse Foundation, as mentioned above, that has taken on this problem with a focus on the new cloud development landscape.

  • IBM is bringing Red Hat OpenShift to Its Platforms

    IBM is fully embracing Red Hat OpenShift. The company recently announced that it will use Red Hat OpenShift as the primary container environment for all its hybrid cloud offerings. This includes IBM Cloud, IBM Cloud Paks running on OpenShift, an entire field of IBM consultants and services people being trained on OpenShift, and OpenShift on IBM Power Systems and Storage, IBM Z and LinuxONE enterprise platforms. With this move, Red Hat OpenShift has become the preferred Kubernetes platform for IBM to address the needs of increasingly critical container workloads.

    With Red Hat OpenShift running on top of IBM’s cloud and systems, existing IBM customers can unlock the hybrid cloud model for software developers and systems architects. OpenShift can transform IBM systems that have been optimized for data, transaction processing and AI workloads into another resource for container-based infrastructure, inside the fold when it comes to networking, APIs and data access controls.

  • Disaster Recovery Strategies for Red Hat OpenShift

    As increasingly complex applications move to the Red Hat OpenShift platform, IT teams should have disaster recovery (DR) processes in place for business continuity in the face of widespread outages. These are not theoretical concerns. Many industries are subject to regulations that require data protection even in the event of massive failures. For instance, CFR 164.308(7)(ii)(Cool of the HIPAA regulation stipulates that companies must be able to “restore ANY loss of data” (emphasis added) in the event of a failure. Thus for some truly mission critical applications to run on OpenShift, disaster recovery is essential.

Announcing Oracle Linux 7 Update 7

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 Update 7. Individual RPM packages are available on the Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) and the Oracle Linux yum server. ISO installation images will soon be available for download from the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud and Docker images will soon be available via Oracle Container Registry and Docker Hub.

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Also: Oracle Linux 7 Update 7 Released

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Steam Play/Proton, GNU/Linux on Xbox, and UnderMine

  • CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy.

  • Turn your Xbox console into a home PC with this guide

    If you’ve ever wondered if you can turn your Xbox into a PC, you came to the right place. Because the Xbox console has the same hardware specifications as some older computer desktops, you will be able to convert it to a fully functioning PC. Unfortunately, you will not be able to install Windows on your console, but you can use the Linux operating system. In this article you will find out what items you’re going to need in order to make this happen, and also the steps you need to follow to accomplish this.

  • Action-adventure roguelike UnderMine now available in Early Access

    UnderMine from developer Thorium is an action-adventure roguelike with a bit of RPG tossed in, it's now in Early Access with Linux support. [...] Featuring some gameplay elements found in the likes of The Binding of Isaac, you proceed further down the UnderMine, going room to room digging for treasure and taking down enemies. There's also some RPG style rogue-lite progression involved too, as you're able to find powerful items and upgrades as you explore to prepare you for further runs.

GNU Scientific Library 2.6 released

Version 2.6 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release introduces major performance improvements to common linear algebra matrix factorizations, as well as numerous new features and bug fixes. The full NEWS file entry is appended below. The file details for this release are: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz.sig The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License. Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements. Patrick Alken Read more

Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU12

Today we are releasing the SRU 12 for Oracle Solaris 11.4. It is available via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1. Read more Also: Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU12 Released - Adds GCC 9.1 Compiler & Python 3.7

Redcore Linux 1908 Released, Which Fixes Many of the Pending Bugs

Redcore Linux developer has released the new version of Redcore Linux 1908 and code name is Mira. This release fixes most of the outstanding bugs and some more polishing. Also, added new features as well. Bunch of packages (1000+) got updated because this release is based on Gentoo’s testing branch, unlike previous releases which were based on a mix of Gentoo’s stable and testing branches. Starting from Redcore Linux 1908, the packages shold be up-to-date since it’s using Gentoo’s testing branch. Read more