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Red Hat

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads

    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

    To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root.

    Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases.

    That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.

  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019

    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.

  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes

    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications.
    Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.

  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want

    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.

  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight

    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 GNOME and display server changes

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 contains some important changes regarding the GNOME graphical interface and the default display server. If you are using a graphical desktop in RHEL 8, the most visible change will be that, by default, the GNOME Shell interface is used. This interface has a different appearance and operation compared to GNOME Classic, the default graphical interface in RHEL 7.

Here, we will cover an overview of the GNOME Shell interface in RHEL 8, and also how to switch to the GNOME Classic interface that is similar to the default interface on RHEL 7. We will also cover the new default display server, Wayland, and how to switch the display server to X.org X11 if needed. Another notable change in RHEL 8 is that the KDE Plasma interface has been removed.

Read more

Red Hat welcomes Oracle to the oVirt community

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Red Hat
Server

On behalf of the oVirt community, its contributors and Red Hat, we welcome Oracle to the oVirt community. oVirt is the open source component that enables management of the Linux Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM), the hypervisor for virtualized environments running on the Linux kernel.

At Red Hat, we believe that upstream collaboration drives innovation, even among competitors. To this end, Red Hat has a 10+ year tenure of thought leadership, contributions and collaboration in the oVirt and KVM communities. Our development and release processes are designed to ensure that Red Hat contributions to these communities are pushed upstream so the benefits gained from our efforts are available to the community at large and available for any and all to draw from.

Read more

Also: IBM-Powered Supercomputers Lead Semi-Annual Rankings

Fedora: ppc64le, release-monitoring.org and GNOME Sessions

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Red Hat
  • Why it's useful to use a deskop on ppc64le

    I want provide a short example what I've met in the past weeks when dog-fooding a ppc64le Fedora desktop environment on my OpenPOWER based Talos II. We have experienced segfaults coming from a smashed stack in some desktop components, although no one using the mainstream arches noticed them. The toolchain guys will be able to explain why eg. x86_64 is immune (or just lucky), but the problems were real issues in the projects' source code. The common denominator was an incorrect callback signature for GTK+ based apps, the callbacks expected different parameters than were passed by their callers. And this kind of inconsistency can't be found during compile time. IMHO it opens possibilities for some static analysis before producing the binaries by looking at the signal definitions in GTK+ and what functions/callbacks are then attached to them in the projects. Or for some AI that will analyze the crashes and look for the common pattern and recommend a solution. And what's the conclusion - as usually, heterogenity helps to improve quality Smile

  • Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #6

    In the dungeons bellow the-new-hotness island was impenetrable darkness. It looks like somebody tried to destroy every source of light. Only my own levitating fireball was shedding some light around. Damage was still visible on walls and furniture, but most of it is now repaired to function properly. I’m glad that you are here with me, otherwise it will be a scary experience. But you probably want to hear what happened.

  • How to Configure Xorg as Default GNOME Session in Fedora

Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Enhanced OpenShift Red Hat AMQ Broker container image for monitoring

    Previously, I blogged about how to enhance your JBoss AMQ 6 container image for production: I explained how to externalise configuration and add Prometheus monitoring. While I already covered the topic well, I had to deal with this topic for version 7.2 of Red Hat AMQ Broker recently, and as things have slightly changed for this new release, I think it deserves an updated blog post!

    This post is a walk-through on how to enhance the base Red Hat AMQ Broker container image to add monitoring. This time we’ll see how much easier it is to provide customizations, even without writing a new Dockerfile. We will even go a step further by providing a Grafana dashboard sample for visualising the broker metrics.

  • Event Report - Fedora Meetup 15th June 2019, Pune, India

    We started planning for this one month back. Since we are doing this meetup regularly now, most of the things were known, only execution was required.

  • Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

    It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift

    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy.

    In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Copr's Dist-Git

    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Ruby 2.6 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the latest Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to share that Ruby 2.6 is now generally available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • How Unicef Is Using Big Data To Close The Education Divide

    Given that challenges around education are only growing, Unicef and Red Hat hope to expand the platform over the coming months.

    Palau Montava says: “We have a pipeline of interested countries that want to be involved, so we anticipate the project will continue to grow. It’s an exciting time to be building these open source projects, and we think they will continue to change the world.

    The school mapping project forms part of the wider Magic Box platform that Unicef will continue to invest in. "Magic Box is an open source collaborative platform where partners like Red Hat share their data and expertise for public good. It’s this great place to harness real-time data generated by the private sector to give organizations like Unicef critical insights," concludes Palau Montava.

  • UPS delivers Agile plan for legacy application modernization

    The switch from Db2 and mainframe application code allowed UPS to access the data through open source Linux systems and host the data on open source Linux container orchestration systems, namely Red Hat OpenShift. This platform is also easier to update frequently and iteratively, as applications change through automated Jenkins CI/CD pipelines, Jani said.

  • Red Hat Takes Home a Trio of CODiE Awards

    It was a big awards night for Red Hat, recently, as three of our products won best in category business technology awards. The 2019 SIIA CODiE Awards have been distributed for over 30 years, now. They are the only peer-recognized program in the business and ed tech industries. In the words of the awards body, “Each CODiE Award win serves as incredible market validation for a product’s innovation, vision and overall industry impact.”

The Fedora distribution Allows user to install multiple version of RPM packages using Modularity Repository

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Red Hat

The Fedora distribution has introduced a new concept called Modularity Repository, which enables Fedora users to install different versions of a package from the distribution’s repositories.

This is not added recently in Fedora, it was shipped with Fedora 28 server edition as an optional repository with additional content.

A lot has changed since then, and now Modularity is a core part of the Fedora distribution.

Read more

Events in America: Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City and LibOCon Latinoamérica

Filed under
LibO
Red Hat
  • Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City

    On May 23, 2019, the Fedora Community in Mexico City ran an awesome Fedora 30 Release Party. This activity took place in the local Red Hat office. We really appreciate the space for our activities and particularly thanks to Alex Callejas (darkaxl017) for doing all the necessary paperwork.

    We had three main activities: An amazing talk from Rolando Cedillo (@rolman) about KVM in Fedora, a Q&A session and our networking time with piz

  • LibOCon Latinoamérica – Asunción 2019, July 19 – 20

    A quick video inviting you to the LibreOffice Latin America Conference 2019! (English subtitles are available.) It will be held at the Facultad Politécnica de Universidad Nactional de Asunción (FPUNA) in Asunción, Paraguay on July 19th (Friday) and 20th (Sat). For more information about the conference please visit the website.

Fedora: Elliott Sales de Andrade, Outreachy and Katacoda

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Update Week 20–22

    Oops, again a bit late, but the past two weekends were fairly busy. I decided to post this today so that it wouldn’t slip another full week. So this probably looks a bit larger than usual, but I hope I didn’t miss anything. Two weeks ago was rather busy with many updates. Not just new releases, but I also spent a little time going over old updates that I’ve missed and ignored due to missing dependencies. Some of these dependencies could be skipped, so I did in order to get the update in.

    Last week was a bit calmer with the updates. Instead, I spent the past week preparing several new Go packages that are dependencies for htmltest, an interesting tool for testing HTML files. I’m hoping these will get some reviews soon.

    Last week was also spent trying to figure out several upstream bugs. Pillow has been having issues on s390x. This turned out to be a bug in the types passed via varargs between Python and C code. Because of disagreement on argument size, this generally ends up being problematic on big-endian systems. I’m still waiting for the upstream PR to be accepted, but we’ve used the patch and been able to rebuild several other dependent packages with it now applied.

    With python-zarr, I’ve been running into failures with LMDB on 32-bit systems. This is generally annoying since it requires rebuilds whenever it got built on one of those systems. Basically, the LMDB store opens a very large file mapping and even though there’s enough RAM to do so, it fails. Thanks to some discussion on the devel mailing list I was pointed in the right direction to fix it. The tests rely on old store being garbage collected, and so a lot of old LMDB mappings are still around causing later ones to fail. I’ve opened a pull request upstream to explicitly close these stores, which reduces the overall memory requirement and fixes the tests.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

    This blog post summaries what I’ve completed in Phase 1 in my Outreachy internship with Fedora Happiness Packets, things I learned and the challenges I faced

  • Katacoda scenario creation
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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.