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Red Hat

Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest

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Red Hat
  • Enhanced OpenShift Red Hat AMQ Broker container image for monitoring

    Previously, I blogged about how to enhance your JBoss AMQ 6 container image for production: I explained how to externalise configuration and add Prometheus monitoring. While I already covered the topic well, I had to deal with this topic for version 7.2 of Red Hat AMQ Broker recently, and as things have slightly changed for this new release, I think it deserves an updated blog post!

    This post is a walk-through on how to enhance the base Red Hat AMQ Broker container image to add monitoring. This time we’ll see how much easier it is to provide customizations, even without writing a new Dockerfile. We will even go a step further by providing a Grafana dashboard sample for visualising the broker metrics.

  • Event Report - Fedora Meetup 15th June 2019, Pune, India

    We started planning for this one month back. Since we are doing this meetup regularly now, most of the things were known, only execution was required.

  • Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

    It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift

    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy.

    In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Copr's Dist-Git

    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Ruby 2.6 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the latest Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to share that Ruby 2.6 is now generally available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • How Unicef Is Using Big Data To Close The Education Divide

    Given that challenges around education are only growing, Unicef and Red Hat hope to expand the platform over the coming months.

    Palau Montava says: “We have a pipeline of interested countries that want to be involved, so we anticipate the project will continue to grow. It’s an exciting time to be building these open source projects, and we think they will continue to change the world.

    The school mapping project forms part of the wider Magic Box platform that Unicef will continue to invest in. "Magic Box is an open source collaborative platform where partners like Red Hat share their data and expertise for public good. It’s this great place to harness real-time data generated by the private sector to give organizations like Unicef critical insights," concludes Palau Montava.

  • UPS delivers Agile plan for legacy application modernization

    The switch from Db2 and mainframe application code allowed UPS to access the data through open source Linux systems and host the data on open source Linux container orchestration systems, namely Red Hat OpenShift. This platform is also easier to update frequently and iteratively, as applications change through automated Jenkins CI/CD pipelines, Jani said.

  • Red Hat Takes Home a Trio of CODiE Awards

    It was a big awards night for Red Hat, recently, as three of our products won best in category business technology awards. The 2019 SIIA CODiE Awards have been distributed for over 30 years, now. They are the only peer-recognized program in the business and ed tech industries. In the words of the awards body, “Each CODiE Award win serves as incredible market validation for a product’s innovation, vision and overall industry impact.”

The Fedora distribution Allows user to install multiple version of RPM packages using Modularity Repository

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Red Hat

The Fedora distribution has introduced a new concept called Modularity Repository, which enables Fedora users to install different versions of a package from the distribution’s repositories.

This is not added recently in Fedora, it was shipped with Fedora 28 server edition as an optional repository with additional content.

A lot has changed since then, and now Modularity is a core part of the Fedora distribution.

Read more

Events in America: Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City and LibOCon Latinoamérica

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LibO
Red Hat
  • Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City

    On May 23, 2019, the Fedora Community in Mexico City ran an awesome Fedora 30 Release Party. This activity took place in the local Red Hat office. We really appreciate the space for our activities and particularly thanks to Alex Callejas (darkaxl017) for doing all the necessary paperwork.

    We had three main activities: An amazing talk from Rolando Cedillo (@rolman) about KVM in Fedora, a Q&A session and our networking time with piz

  • LibOCon Latinoamérica – Asunción 2019, July 19 – 20

    A quick video inviting you to the LibreOffice Latin America Conference 2019! (English subtitles are available.) It will be held at the Facultad Politécnica de Universidad Nactional de Asunción (FPUNA) in Asunción, Paraguay on July 19th (Friday) and 20th (Sat). For more information about the conference please visit the website.

Fedora: Elliott Sales de Andrade, Outreachy and Katacoda

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Update Week 20–22

    Oops, again a bit late, but the past two weekends were fairly busy. I decided to post this today so that it wouldn’t slip another full week. So this probably looks a bit larger than usual, but I hope I didn’t miss anything. Two weeks ago was rather busy with many updates. Not just new releases, but I also spent a little time going over old updates that I’ve missed and ignored due to missing dependencies. Some of these dependencies could be skipped, so I did in order to get the update in.

    Last week was a bit calmer with the updates. Instead, I spent the past week preparing several new Go packages that are dependencies for htmltest, an interesting tool for testing HTML files. I’m hoping these will get some reviews soon.

    Last week was also spent trying to figure out several upstream bugs. Pillow has been having issues on s390x. This turned out to be a bug in the types passed via varargs between Python and C code. Because of disagreement on argument size, this generally ends up being problematic on big-endian systems. I’m still waiting for the upstream PR to be accepted, but we’ve used the patch and been able to rebuild several other dependent packages with it now applied.

    With python-zarr, I’ve been running into failures with LMDB on 32-bit systems. This is generally annoying since it requires rebuilds whenever it got built on one of those systems. Basically, the LMDB store opens a very large file mapping and even though there’s enough RAM to do so, it fails. Thanks to some discussion on the devel mailing list I was pointed in the right direction to fix it. The tests rely on old store being garbage collected, and so a lot of old LMDB mappings are still around causing later ones to fail. I’ve opened a pull request upstream to explicitly close these stores, which reduces the overall memory requirement and fixes the tests.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1

    This blog post summaries what I’ve completed in Phase 1 in my Outreachy internship with Fedora Happiness Packets, things I learned and the challenges I faced

  • Katacoda scenario creation

Red Hat and SUSE: Openshift, RHEL and Cloudwashing

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Using Kubernetes Operators to Manage Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificates for Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated
  • No Downtime Upgrade for Red Hat Data Grid on Openshift

    In a blog post I wrote on the Red Hat Developer’s Blog, I wrote about multiple layers of security available while deploying Red Hat Data Grid on Red Hat Openshift. Another challenging problem I see for customer is performing a no downtime upgrade for Red Hat Data Grid images (published on Red Hat Container Catalog). That’s what we’re going to tackle in this post.

    If you’re new to it, Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed designed to deliver a superior user experience compared to traditional data stores like relational databases. In-memory Data Grids have a variety of use cases in today’s environments, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies.

  • World domination with cgroups in RHEL 8: welcome cgroups v2!

    One of the great things about open source development is that features can be designed and implemented organically and grow and change as needed. However, a drawback is that this methodology can sometimes lead to a hot mess and uncomfortable technical debt.

    In the case of cgroups v1, as the maintainer Tejun Heo admits, "design followed implementation," "different decisions were taken for different controllers," and "sometimes too much flexibility causes a hindrance."

    In short, not all of the controllers behave in the same manner and it is also completely possible to get yourself into very strange situations if you don’t carefully engineer your group hierarchy. Therefore, cgroups v2 was developed to simplify and standardize some of this.

    Let’s take a look at how the two versions are different. I’m going to show two different diagrams - controllers are in yellow blocks and cgroup directories have a grey background.

  • Cloud Strategies in Frankfurt
  • Are We Ready to Ditch the Data Center? [Ed: Perpetuating the myth that when you outsource all business functions to the Pentagon through its partners the servers just vanish and cease to exist]

    Over the past few decades, organizations have come to rely on their own data centers to run business applications, network their users together and for data storage. Initially, these data centers were largely hardware-centric.In the early days, a mainframe and terminals were the order of the day, before we moved onto the RISC/UNIX era, followed more recently by the server sprawl period of commodity X86 servers.
    But now, the whole concept of an organization-owned data center is going through a radical change. It started with virtualization, which separated the direct relationship between application software and the underlying hardware infrastructure. This helped improve server utilization, efficiency, and provisioning speed. The next step towards an even greater level of abstraction is the move to a software-defined infrastructure (SDI), including compute, storage and networking.

Speed Up Gnome Shell On Fedora 30 Using This Copr Repository

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Red Hat

There's a Copr repository for Fedora 30 that presumably speeds up Gnome Shell and Mutter by adding some patches. The repository also has builds for Fedora 29, and while they are no longer maintained, they should still work.

Gnome already worked fine on my laptop running Fedora 30, so I can't say from personal experience how big of an impact it makes. You can give it a try, and if you don't notice any improvements, or if it makes things worse, you can easily remove it.

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Also: Fedora Gooey Karma Week 2 report GSoC

Converting fedmsg consumers to fedora-messaging

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Red Hat

So in case you hadn’t heard, the Fedora infrastructure team is currently trying to nudge people in the direction of moving from fedmsg to fedora-messaging.

Fedmsg is the Fedora project-wide messaging bus we’ve had since 2012. It backs FMN / Fedora Notifications and Badges, and is used extensively within Fedora infrastructure for the general purpose of “have this one system do something whenever this other system does something else”. For instance, openQA job scheduling and result reporting are both powered by fedmsg.

Over time, though, there have turned out to be a few issues with fedmsg. It has a few awkward design quirks, but most significantly, it’s designed such that message delivery can never be guaranteed. In practice it’s very reliable and messages almost always are delivered, but for building critical systems like Rawhide package gating, the infrastructure team decided we really needed a system where message delivery can be formally guaranteed.

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Fedora: Applications for Writing Markdown, Community Platform Engineering Team, Securing Linux with Ansible

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
  • Fedora Magazine: Applications for writing Markdown

    Markdown is a lightweight markup language that is useful for adding formatting while still maintaining readability when viewing as plain text. Markdown (and Markdown derivatives) are used extensively as the priumary form of markup of documents on services like GitHub and pagure. By design, Markdown is easily created and edited in a text editor, however, there are a multitude of editors available that provide a formatted preview of Markdown markup, and / or provide a text editor that highlights the markdown syntax.

    This article covers 3 desktop applications for Fedora Workstation that help out when editing Markdown.

  • Fedora Community Blog: State of the Community Platform Engineering team

    About two years ago the Fedora Engineering team merged with the CentOS Engineering team to form what is now called the Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team. For the team members, the day to day work did not change much.

    The members working on Fedora are still fully dedicated to work on the Fedora project on those working on CentOS are still fully dedicated to CentOS. On both projects its members are involved in infrastructure, release engineering, and design. However, it brought the two infrastructures and teams closer to each other, allowing for more collaboration between them.

    There are 20 people on this consolidated team.

  • Christopher Smart: Securing Linux with Ansible

    The Ansible Hardening role from the OpenStack project is a great way to secure Linux boxes in a reliable, repeatable and customisable manner.

    It was created by former colleague of mine Major Hayden and while it was spun out of OpenStack, it can be applied generally to a number of the major Linux distros (including Fedora, RHEL, CentOS, Debian, SUSE).

    The role is based on the Secure Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) out of the Unites States for RHEL, which provides recommendations on how best to secure a host and the services it runs (category one for highly sensitive systems, two for medium and three for low). This is similar to the Information Security Manual (ISM) we have in Australia, although the STIG is more explicit.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest

  • Enhanced OpenShift Red Hat AMQ Broker container image for monitoring
    Previously, I blogged about how to enhance your JBoss AMQ 6 container image for production: I explained how to externalise configuration and add Prometheus monitoring. While I already covered the topic well, I had to deal with this topic for version 7.2 of Red Hat AMQ Broker recently, and as things have slightly changed for this new release, I think it deserves an updated blog post! This post is a walk-through on how to enhance the base Red Hat AMQ Broker container image to add monitoring. This time we’ll see how much easier it is to provide customizations, even without writing a new Dockerfile. We will even go a step further by providing a Grafana dashboard sample for visualising the broker metrics.
  • Event Report - Fedora Meetup 15th June 2019, Pune, India
    We started planning for this one month back. Since we are doing this meetup regularly now, most of the things were known, only execution was required.
  • Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1
    It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

today's howtos

SUSE: SLE 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1 and More

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1
  • A demo based introduction to SUSE Cloud Application Platform
    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Peter Andersson and Peter Lunderbye from SUSE demonstrated SUSE Cloud Application Platform, including pushing your first app, buildpacks: what are they and how they can be utilised, scaling and how easy the platform makes it, and how to improve resiliency and availability of your app. SUSE has posted all recorded talks from SUSECON on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what SUSE has to offer. We’re not just Linux anymore! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days.
  • Enabling Discoveries with AI and HPC (and the Rise of Helium)
    This week I am attending the International Supercomputing conference in Frankfurt, and I am in awe of the scientists and researchers that are here and their ability to dig in and understand super complex problems in very specialized areas.  While I am humbled by the world-changing work represented at a conference like this, I am also honored to be playing a small part in their success.  With the next iteration of SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15 SP1, we’ve expanded and refreshed our bundle of popular HPC tools and libraries that we make available along with every subscription to our SLE HPC operating system.

Programming/Development Leftovers

  • Python Community Interview With Marlene Mhangami
    We are joined today by Marlene Mhangami. Marlene is a passionate Pythonista who is not only using tech to facilitate social change and empower Zimbabwean women but is also the chair of the very first PyCon Africa. Join me as we talk about her non-traditional start in tech, as well as her passion for using technology to create social change for good.
  • PyDev of the Week: Meredydd Luff
    This week we welcome Meredydd Luff (@meredydd) as our PyDev of the Week! Meredydd is the co-founder of Anvil and a core developer for the Skulpt package.
  • New Style Signal/Slot Connection
    Yes, I know. The last post on the assistants is rather boring. And yet these days I have been working on the snapshot docker, though it still seems a little (just a little, you see) unfinished as Dmitry is said to experience a relatively high delay when switching between snapshots. However this is not what I can reproduce on my older laptop, so I am really waiting for his test results in order to further investigate the problem. But there is something interesting happening just when I am randomly testing things. From Krita’s debug output, I saw QObject::connect() complaining about the arguments I passed, saying it is expecting parenthesis. “Okay,” I thought, “then there have to be something wrong with the code I wrote.” And that was quite confusing. I remember having used member function pointers in those places, got a compile-time error since KisSignalAutoConnectionsStore did not support the new syntax, then switched back to the SINGAL() and SLOT() macros. KisSignalAutoConnectionsStore is a helper class to quickly (dis)connect a group of connections. One can use the addConnection() method to add a connection, and use clear() to remove all connections made before. Well, everything good, apart from the fact that I missed the parenthesis, which I did not discover until I looked into the debug output. So I asked Dmitry why not add the new syntax to KisSignalAutoConnectionsStore, and he said we should.
  • Arm Developer Provides More Glibc Optimizations - Memem & Strstr
    Arm's Wilco Dijkstra landed some more optimizations this past week in the Glibc development code for the upcoming GNU C Library 2.30 release.  Memmem is now faster on AArch64 by up to 6.6x times thanks to implementing a modified Horspool algorithm. 
  • Learn PyQt: Gradient
    This custom PyQt5/PySide2-compatible widget provides a gradient designer providing a handy interface to design linear gradients in your applications. A new gradient can be created simply by creating an instance of the object. gradient = Gradient() The default gradient is black to white. The stop points are marked by a red box with a white line drawn vertically through it so they are visible on any gradient.
  • Building Apache Kafka Streams applications using Red Hat AMQ Streams: Part 1
  • What's your favorite "dead" language?
  • Which Is A Better Programming Language For Data Science? Python Or R
  • Introduction to OpenCV with Python
  • AI Paris 2019 in one picture
  • 5 transferable higher-education skills
    As a developer jumping head-first into technology after years of walking students through the process of navigating higher education, imposter syndrome has been a constant fear since moving into technology. However, I have been able to take heart in knowing my experience as an educator and an administrator has not gone in vain. If you are like me, be encouraged in knowing that these transferable skills, some of which fall into the soft-skills and other categories, will continue to benefit you as a developer and a professional.