Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Here’s Why Switching to Linux Makes Sense in 2021

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux does have several benefits over Windows and macOS in certain areas. People are realizing it, and it is slowly gaining popularity in the desktop OS market.

Of course, the majority of desktop users still swear by Windows or macOS, but a greater number of users are trying out new Linux distributions to see if they can switch to Linux.

They may have heard good things about Linux as a desktop choice, or just want to try something different while confined to their homes. Who knows?

Here, I will be presenting you all the good reasons why Linux makes more sense in 2021.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Manjaro Cutefish, Self-Hosted, RasPad 3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Guix: Substitutes now also available from bordeaux.guix.gnu.org

    There have been a number of different project operated sources of substitutes, for the last couple of years the default source of substitutes has been ci.guix.gnu.org (with a few different URLs).

    [...]

    This change is an important milestone, following on from the work that started on the Guix Build Coordinator towards the start of 2020.

    Back in 2020, the substitute availability from ci.guix.gnu.org was often an issue. There seemed to be a number of contributing factors, including some parts of the architecture. Without going too much in to the details of the issues, aspects of the design of the Guix Build Coordinator were specifically meant to avoid some of these issues.

    While there were some very positive results from testing back in 2020, it's taken so long to bring the substitute availability benefits to general users of Guix that ci.guix.gnu.org has changed and improved significantly in the meantime. This means that any benefits in terms of substitute availability are less significant now.

    One clearer benefit of just having two independent sources of substitutes is redundancy. While the availability of ci.guix.gnu.org has been very high (in my opinion), having a second independent substitute server should mean that if there's a future issue with users accessing either source of substitutes, the disruption should be reduced.

    I'm also excited about the new possibilities offered by having a second substitute server, particularly one using the Guix Build Coordinator to manage the builds.

    Substitutes for the Hurd is already something that's been prototyped, so I'm hopeful that bordeaux.guix.gnu.org can start using childhurd VMs to build things soon.

    Looking a bit further forward, I think there's some benefits to be had in doing further work on how the nar and narinfo files used for substitutes are managed. There are some rough plans already on how to address the retention of nars, and how to look at high performance mirrors.

  • Gary Linden, legendary surfer & Firefox fan

    On the internet you are never alone, and because of that at Mozilla we know that we can’t work to build a better internet alone. We believe in and rely on our community — from our volunteers, to our staff, to our users and even the parent’s of our staff (who also happen to be some of our power users). For Father’s Day, Mozilla’s Natalie Linden sat down with her father, big wave surf legend and surfboard maker, Gary Linden to talk the ocean, the internet and where humanity goes from here.

    We should probably start by telling people who we are. I am Natalie Linden, the Director of the Creative Studio in Mozilla marketing.

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 18 June 2021

    The week has zipped by --it's Friday already-- and it's time to take a look at what the Apache community has been up to over the past week...

  • A revival at the intersection of open source and open standards – TechCrunch

    Tremendous technological innovation and transformative power are possible for the future if we re-energize the spirit of collaboration between the open-standards and open-source communities.

  • Open Source, Open Standards, and the Need for Collaboration

    “Our world has big problems to solve,” says Guy Martin, executive director of OASIS Open, and finding solutions will require open source and open standards communities to work together.

    In a recent article at TechCrunch, Martin describes the differences between open source and open standards but also examines their similarities and common goals, such as interoperability, innovation, and choice.

Audiocasts/Show: RasPad, Ubuntu Podcast, BSDNow

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • The RasPad 3 - Unboxing and Assembly (Full review tomorrow!!!)

    The RasPad 3 is a neat project that enables you to turn your Raspberry Pi 4 into a full tablet! In this video, I'll unbox the RasPad 3 and I'll also show you the entire assembly process. Be sure to check out my full review as well.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E15 – Tanks Crash Clash

    This week we’ve been learning Davinci Resolve and instrumenting our house with DHT11 sensors. We round up the goings on from the Ubuntu community and discuss our favourite picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 15 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • BSDNow 407: The jail Detail

    Confining the omnipotent root, Jails with ZFS and PF on DigitalOcean, NomadBSD 130R is out, KDE Plasma Wayland on FreeBSD, Firefox under FreeBSD with Privacy, Using NetBSD’s pkgsrc everywhere, and more.

GNU Projects: Coreutils, Taler, and gdbm

Filed under
GNU
  • Rewriting the GNU Coreutils in Rust

    As movement toward memory-safe languages, and Rust in particular, continues to grow, it is worth looking at one of the larger scale efforts to port C code that has existed for decades to Rust. The uutils project aims to rewrite all of the individual utilities included in the GNU Coreutils project in Rust. Originally created by Jordi Boggiano in 2013, the project aims to provide drop-in replacements for the Coreutils programs, adding the data-race protection and memory safety that Rust provides.

    Many readers will be familiar with the Coreutils project. It includes the basic file, process, and text manipulation programs that are expected to exist on every GNU-based operating system. The Coreutils project was created to consolidate three sets of tools that were previously offered separately, Fileutils, Textutils, and Shellutils, along with some other miscellaneous utilities. Many of the programs that are included in the project, such as rm, du, ls, and cat, have been around for multiple decades and, though other implementations exist, these utilities are not available for platforms like Windows in their original form.

    Collectively, the Coreutils programs are seen as low-hanging fruit where a working Rust-based version can be produced in a reasonable amount of time. The requirements for each utility are clear and many of the them are conceptually straightforward, although that's not to suggest that the work is easy. While a lot of progress has been made to get uutils into a usable state, it will take some time for it to reach the stability and maturity of Coreutils.

    The use of Rust for this project will help to speed this process along since a huge swathe of possible memory errors and other undefined behavior is eliminated entirely. It also opens the door to the use of efficient, race-free multithreading which has the potential to speed up some of the programs under certain conditions. The uutils rewrite also provides an opportunity to not just reimplement Coreutils but to also enhance the functionality of some of the utilities to yield a better user experience, while maintaining compatibility with the GNU versions. For example, feature requests that have long been rejected in the Coreutils project, like adding a progress bar option for utilities like mv and cp, are currently being entertained in this Rust rewrite.

  • 2021-6: SUERF Policy Brief "How to issue a privacy-preserving central bank digital currency" published

    We are happy to announce the publication of our policy brief on "How to issue a privacy-preserving central bank digital currency" by The European Money and Finance Forum.

    Many central banks are currently investigating Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) and possible designs. A recent survey conducted by the European Central Bank has found that both citizens and professionals consider privacy the most important feature of a CBDC. We show how a central bank could issue a CBDC that would be easily scalable and allow the preservation of a key feature of physical cash: transaction privacy. At the same time the proposed design would meet regulatory requirements and thus offer an appropriate balance between privacy and legal compliance.

  • gdbm @ Savannah: Version 1.20

    Version 1.20 is available for download.

Audiocasts/Shows: The Linux Link Tech Show, FLOSS Weekly, 'Freenode Is Now Dead'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 910

    upgrading raspberry pi to buster, sd card imaging woes, apple replacement woes, food

  • FLOSS Weekly 634: Web Development with Wasp

    Martin Sosic, Co-Founder and CTO of Wasp joins Doc Searls and Katherine Druckman on FLOSS Weekly. Wasp is a simple and exciting new open-source language for developing full-stack web apps with less code. Sosic shares more about Wasp as well as where web development is going and many of the issues involved for both developers and users.

  • Freenode Is Now Dead: Birth Of A New Freenode

    Andrew Lee can't just let Freenode collapse, every step of the way he keep kicking it faster down the hill and now he has actually done it, Freenode might now be actually dead.

New Videos of Linux Mint 20.2 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 20.2 Beta XFCE

    Today we are looking at LinuxMint 20.2 Beta, the XFCE edition. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.4 (upgradeable to 5.8), XFCE 4.16, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling.

  • Linux Mint 20.2 Beta MATE

    Today we are looking at LinuxMint 20.2 Beta, the MATE edition. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.4 (upgradeable to 5.8), MATE 1.24.0, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling.

  • Linux Mint 20.2 Beta Cinnamon

    Today we are looking at LinuxMint 20.2 Beta, the Cinnamon Edtion It comes with Linux Kernel 5.4 (upgradeable to 5.8), Cinnamon 5.0, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling.

10 Linux Distros for Beginners, Intermediate, and Advanced Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As a free and open-source OS, Linux continues to spread its wings, amassing attention from new and experienced people alike.

Whether you are a beginner, an intermediate, or an advanced user, there is already a distribution waiting for you.

Check out some of these desktops and install the ones which suit your interests and skillsets.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, openSUSE 15.3, Coder Radio, mintCast and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Listen to LibrePlanet 2021, FSF Drops the Mic on Freenode

Filed under
GNU
  • Listen to LibrePlanet 2021 audio in your podcast app

    LibrePlanet 2021 had a fantastic range of talented speakers, and we want to showcase their terrific talks in every way we can. So if you prefer listening to viewing, it's time to plan a long afternoon walk, fire up your favorite free podcasting app, and listen to LibrePlanet!

    The audio from this year's entertaining and educational talks is now available. We have uploaded the sessions in conjunction with an RSS feed you can import into your favorite podcasting app or RSS reader, enabling you to listen using a free podcast app like AntennaPod via Android, or gPodder, if you are on your desktop computer.

  • Update to the FSF and GNU's plan to move IRC channels to Libera.Chat

    Following our announcement of a planned gradual switch from the Freenode IRC network to Libera.Chat, Freenode staff, with no notice, seized control of the #fsf and #gnu channels away from FSF staff and GNU volunteers during the early hours of Sunday morning (EDT). This happened despite members of Freenode staff participating in the community meeting, as well as reassuring us publicly and privately that they would respect and support the resulting review and our decision. These channels were seized without informing the FSF or GNU representatives of any disagreements Freenode staff had with our plan, whether by means of the group contact system or otherwise. Adding to the situation's instability was their switch to a new IRC daemon late last night, also without notice, which dropped all existing nicks and channels from the database.

    This has forced us to adjust our plans for the transition, a move that was already necessary due to an abrupt change in Freenode policy that occurred shortly after our announcement, which eliminated the distinction between # and ## channels that we planned to use to pass ownership of the #fsf and #gnu channels over to the wider free software community.

  • GStreamer: IRC Channel has moved from Freenode to OFTC

    Due to the widely reported issues at the Freenode IRC network, the official GStreamer discussion IRC channel has moved to #gstreamer on the OFTC IRC network alongside other Freedesktop projects.

  • Developer chat moving

    For years, most development discussion for Krita has happened on the #krita channel on the Freenode IRC network. IRC is a venerable chat system (that’s to say, it’s old and quirky) but it works very well for us because it’s free and open source software and because it treats chat as chat: it doesn’t keep logs for you if you’re not in the channel, there are many clients and interaction is simple and limited to just text.

    However, the freenode IRC network is no longer a good host for our development work. The people currently managing the network are doing very strange things, and the people who used to manage the network have created a new network, libera.chat.

  • Freenode Is IRC; As In "Dumbest Takeover In History"

    Just today morning, freenode pulled the trigger on their servers and removed all channels, all users, all settings… Everything. And they say that they have restarted the network and will move to a new “fork”:

    [Global Notice 1/3] We are moving past legacy freenode to a new fork. The new freenode is launched. You will slowly be disconnected and when you reconnect, you will be on the new freenode. We patiently await to welcome you in freedom’s holdout – the freenode.

    [Global Notice 2/3] If you’re looking to connect now, you can already /server chat.freenode.net 6697 (ssl) or 6667 (plaintext). It’s a new genesis for a new era. Thank you for using freenode, and Hello World, from the future. freenode is IRC. freenode is FOSS. freenode is freedom.

    [Global Notice 3/3] When you connect, register your nickname and your channel and get started. It’s a new world. We’re so happy to welcome you and the millions of others. We will be posting more information in the coming days on our website and twitter. Otherwise, see you on the other side!

    freenode, which was the largest active IRC network, was taken over by Andrew Lee; The Korean crown prince. Former staff and volunteers say that there was absolutely no way this selling process could be legal, but due to his wealth and powerful relations, the Korean prince could not be stopped.

    Until today, by his own stupidity.

    The madman paid a large sum of money to buy the network – which is not yet disclosed – and then, started taking channels from their owners whenever they mentioned LiberaChat; an alternative to the freenode IRC network.

    One channel after another… Almost all FOSS community migrated away in a matter of few days when the controversy started. netsplit.de showed that 30-40K users migrated to the new network in less than a week.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Here’s Why Switching to Linux Makes Sense in 2021

Linux does have several benefits over Windows and macOS in certain areas. People are realizing it, and it is slowly gaining popularity in the desktop OS market. Of course, the majority of desktop users still swear by Windows or macOS, but a greater number of users are trying out new Linux distributions to see if they can switch to Linux. They may have heard good things about Linux as a desktop choice, or just want to try something different while confined to their homes. Who knows? Here, I will be presenting you all the good reasons why Linux makes more sense in 2021. Read more

today's leftovers

  • LHS Episode #416: The Weekender LXXIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Donation button removed

    Over the years, I have blown hot and cold over whether to have a donation button. Did take it down for awhile, about a year ago I think. I received an email asking if can send me a bank cheque, which reminded me about that donation button. I declined the offer. I really don't need donations. It is really my pleasure to upload blog reports about EasyOS, Puppy, DIY hiking gear, and all the rest that have posted about. Ibiblio.org is still very kindly hosting downloads, and I also went back to the Puppy Forum.

  • Akademy 2021 – I

    I am still digesting the load of information that Marc Mutz gave in his intense training session last night between 6 and almost 11 p.m. about C++/STL history, containers, iterators, allocators, the Non-Owning Interface Idiom and all that other good stuff. Great job Marc.

  • Stuck Updates Fix

    When rolling out a new feature that lets you skip (offline) updates on boot-up earlier this week we have messed up and also brought in a nasty bug that prevents updates from applying. Unfortunately we can’t automatically rectify this problem because, well, updates are never applied. In case you find Discover showing the same updates over and over again, even after rebooting to apply the update, you may be affected.

  • AWS SSM Parameters

    If you are not familiar with the Parameter Store it provides hierarchical storage for config data, strings, and other values. As well as being used for storing private information the parameter store provides a public namespace for SUSE, /aws/service/suse, which is now being leveraged to provide the latest image id’s for all active SUSE images.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Steam on ChromeOS: Not a Rumor Anymore - Boiling Steam

    If you follow us or other sources like Chrome Unboxed you are by now aware that there’s ample rumors about Google/Valve working on bringing Steam on ChromeOS. We know the technology pieces are there, as recently discussed with Luke Short in our recent podcast. However, we are still waiting for an official announcement that would turn the expected rumors into reality.

  • First American Financial Pays Farcical $500K Fine

    In May 2019, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that the website of mortgage settlement giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] was leaking more than 800 million documents — many containing sensitive financial data — related to real estate transactions dating back 16 years. This week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settled its investigation into the matter after the Fortune 500 company agreed to pay a paltry penalty of less than $500,000.

  • How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

    Estonia is no stranger to the cyber threat posed by Russia. Back in 2007, a decision to relocate a Soviet-era war memorial from central Tallinn to a military cemetery sparked a diplomatic spat with its neighbor and former overlord. There were protests and angry statements from Russian diplomats. And just as the removal works started, Estonia became the target of what was at the time the biggest cyberattack against a single country.

    The Estonian government called the incident an act of cyberwarfare and blamed Russia for it. Moscow has denied any involvement.

    The attack made Estonia realize that it needed to start treating cyber threats in the same way as physical attacks.

  • Most Businesses That Pay Off After Ransomware Hack Hit With Second Attack: Study [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The study surveyed nearly 1,300 security professionals around the world and found that 80 percent of businesses that paid after a ransomware attack suffered a second attack. Of those hit a second time, 46 percent believed it came from the same group that did the first attack.

    Censuswide, which performed the study on behalf of the international cybersecurity company Cybereason, found that 25 percent of organizations hit by a ransomware attack were forced to close. In addition, 29 percent were forced to eliminate jobs.

Kernel: Oracle, UPower, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Oracle Sends Out Latest Linux Patches So Trenchboot Can Securely Launch The Kernel - Phoronix

    Trenchboot continues to be worked on for providing boot integrity technologies that allow for multiple roots of trust around boot security and integrity. Oracle engineers on Friday sent out their latest Linux kernel patches so it can enjoy a "Secure Launch" by the project's x86 dynamic launch measurements code. The latest kernel patches are a second revision to patches sent out last year around the Trenchboot launch support for enhancing the integrity and security of the boot process. This kernel work goes along with Trenchboot support happening for GRUB.

  • Nearly A Decade Later, UPower Still Working Towards 1.0 Release

    For nearly one decade there has been talk of UPower 1.0 while in 2021 that still has yet to materialize for this former "DeviceKit-Power" project but at least now there is UPower v0.99.12 as the first release in two years. UPower 1.0 has yet to materialize and it certainly isn't advancing these days like it was in the early 2010s. With Thursday's UPower 0.99.12 release the key changes to land over the past two years are supporting more device types and power reporting for newer Apple iPhone smartphones like the iPhone XR, XS, and other newer models.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. Tracing in the Linux kernel is constantly improving. Tracing was officially added to Linux in 2008. Since then, more tooling has been constantly added to help out with visibility. The work is still ongoing, with Perf, ftrace, Lttng, and eBPF. User space tooling is expanding and as the kernel gets more complex, so does the need for facilitating seeing what is going on under the hood.