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Manjaro ARM Beta16 of Phosh for PinePhone!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

The Manjaro ARM project is proud to announce our sixteenth BETA release for the PinePhone running Phosh!

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Audiocasts/Shows: Windowxfx 11, mintCast, and LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Wireguard vs OpenVPN on NordVPN with T-Mobile Home Internet on Debian GNU/Linux. Bonus: T-Mobile Home Internet Nokia modem has bad WiFi defaults.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Before Private Internet Access went to hell, I once spoke to their former tech support people about Windows 10 in their IRC chat room, and “Max-P” told me that writing VPN software for Windows was the worst part of the job. He said that preventing “leakage”, that is, where your kill switch doesn’t work and your traffic spills out onto the open internet, which is what you bought the VPN to avoid, is very difficult to ensure on Windows.

Furthermore, it’s hard to get any decent sort of throughput on a VPN in Windows, because Windows doesn’t have any sort of usable and secure VPN tech included in the OS. In fact, NordVPN says that if you try using IKEv2 in Windows 10, it will sabotage it by using weak cryptography. (“Note: the Windows system configuration downgrades the cipher to the weaker 3DES-CBC encryption.“)

Most Windows VPN software use “WinTun” to route traffic around and are essentially rate limited and use a ton of CPU time for overhead. That is, doing nothing important at all and tying up system resources. Creating more bottlenecks due to inherently bad design.

The VPN situation on Linux is….better. If it doesn’t make your networking stack great again, it’ll at least help make it tolerable. You can set up NetworkManager and bypass VPN software entirely, and use OpenVPN binaries from your Linux distribution, or you can use something like NordVPN’s client which makes things a little bit simpler, hopefully, with commands like “nordvpn c”, “nordvpn d”, “nordvpn set autoconnect on”, “nordvpn set killswitch on” and so on.

It takes but a few minutes to understand how to use NordVPN’s LInux software, and unlike the Windows version, there isn’t all sorts of nasty stuff going on behind the scenes. The killswitch is just firewall rules. There doesn’t need to be a lot of crazy stuff going on that can make your internet connection unusable if the connection drops out until you reboot the computer, which is what often happens on Windows 10. Also, their client for Linux doesn’t pop up notifications to go read their blog posts.

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Videos: Ubuntu Budgie 21.10 Beta and Easy Anti Cheat + Battleye Now Supported on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

HOT DOG Linux for Retro Linux fans

Filed under
GNU
Linux

HOT DOG Linux is only a Linux distribution in the broader sense. HOT DOG stands for
H orrible O bsolete T ypeface and D readful O nscreen G raphics for Linux, and the name says it all.

The project tries to on a modern basis look and feel to imitate older user interfaces. This includes Windows 3.1 Hot Dog Stand, Amiga Workbench, Atari ST GEM and the surface of classic Macs. A display with a low DPI value is recommended for use, as the graphics used are only available in bitmap format in a predefined size. HOT DOG Linux can be used either in 5: 4 landscape mode or in 3: 4 in portrait mode.

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The Best Linux Laptops of 2021 for Developers and Enthusiasts

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you want a great Linux experience, we recommend getting a laptop that comes with a Linux OS pre-installed. That way your laptop's hardware and drivers will work without a hitch. Here are our recommendations to do just that.

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4MLinux 37.1 released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 5.10.63. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.49, MariaDB 10.6.4, and PHP 7.4.23 (see this post for more details).

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, GNOME, Goto, Ubuntu MATE 21.10 Beta, and Destination Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #431: SDR++ Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 431 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take an in-depth look at the SDR++ client program for SDR receivers and transceivers. Topics include where to find the software, it's origins, code base and license and more. Further discussion includes installing from the package repos or building the software, running the code, configuring the basic features as well as navigating the interface and controlling your SDR. We hope you enjoy this content and tune in for the next episodes as well. Have a great week.

  • A Better Menu For The GNOME Desktop - Invidious

    Fly-Pie is a GNOME extension that let's you create your own custom menus. You can use it to launch applications, simulate hotkeys, open URLs and much more. The coolest feature, in my opinion, is how easy it is to navigate the menus either by clicking or by simply dragging the mouse.

  • Alias & Navigate Anywhere On Linux With Goto - Invidious

    Managing your navigation aliases under Linux can be a bit of a hassle and today we're looking at a tool called goto that aims to simplify that process, by separating those out from the rest of your shell aliases and providing some useful extra functionality like tab completion

  • Ubuntu MATE 21.10 Beta Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at Ubuntu MATE 21.10 Beta. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu MATE 21.10 Beta

    Today we are looking at Ubuntu MATE 21.10 Beta. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.13, MATE Desktop 1.26, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Destination Linux 245: What Linux Needs For Desktop Domination

    This week’s episode of Destination Linux, we’re going to discuss what’s needed to take Linux desktop over the finish line. Then we’re going to pay our respects to Sir Clive Sinclair with a very special Treasure Hunt. Plus we’ve also got our famous tips, tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more this week on Destination Linux. So whether you’re brand new to Linux and open source or a guru of sudo. This is the podcast for you.

Switched from Windows 10 to Debian 11 on Lenovo ThinkBook 15 Gen2 ITL. Plus, thoughts on Ubuntu and Fedora.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu

I finally got off Windows again.

It seems like every time I buy a new laptop, Windows is all that really works right on it for a while, and then I find a place to hop off.

Well, Debian 11 is that place for my Lenovo Thinkbook 15 ITL Gen2 (really rolls off the tongue, doesn’t it?). This laptop is a monster, and Lenovo got a lot of hardware into it cheaply, but they do cut corners in a lot of scary places.

Like that BIOS update that killed Windows 10 a few months ago.

While Lenovo says this laptop has Ubuntu “Certification”, they don’t support it. In fact, they apparently tell people on Lenovo Forums looking for help to “reinstall Windows”. Hard pass.

I managed to figure out why Ubuntu can apparently see the NVME SSD on this laptop and most other Linux distributions (including Debian 11) can’t.

It turns out that Lenovo is still putting Intel’s “VMD” on laptops. I looked for what in the hell this actually is, and Intel goes on and on about how it’s a “feature” to hide the hardware from the OS which would seem to indicate that it is mostly useful on servers, so when I evaluated Debian and came to the conclusion that everything worked okay, I did a few last steps, including installing one more BIOS update from within Windows. Hoping that it would clean up the mess of warnings that are in seemingly everyone’s system logs if they boot Linux, and which spew a nice bunch of crap about failing to reserve ACPI devices and bogus ACPI AML tables. Alas, it did not.

FWIW, according to at least one Ubuntu developer, they’re an eyesore, but apparently harmless.

Turning off VMD (server article, but after using the NOVO button to get into the BIOS, same deal) managed to make the system log complaints about having access denied go away, which is nice since many people complained that they couldn’t actually boot their computer into Linux until disabling this, even though the installer ran okay.

I also disabled Secure Boot, which has never secured any Linux computer. In fact, about all it ever has done for us is put Microsoft at the “root of trust” and I’d rather trust a hungry bear with a steak in my back pocket than Microsoft.

Oh, and if anyone from the FSF is reading this, feel free to tell Stallman that they can give a Free Software Award to me next time. I haven’t written any Free Software programs, sure, but I also haven’t done anything to sabotage your movement in ways you might never recover from, like Microsoft employee Miguel de Icaza and uEFI “Secure Boot” troll and overall pervert Matthew Garrett have. While you were pinning a medal on Garrett, you also had a page blasting this Security Theater as “Restricted Boots”.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Proxmox, Slimbook One, Manjaro 21.1.3 GNOME Edition, and Full Circle Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Proxmox VE Full Course: Class 9 - User Management - Invidious

    Welcome back to LearnLinuxTV's full course on Proxmox Virtual Environment! In class #9, we'll look at how user management is structured, and we'll walk through the process of creating several accounts.

  • Better Mac Mini than the Mac Mini - Slimbook One Review - Invidious

    This is the Slimbook One, and it's a small form factor desktop. It looks really good, and it packs a surprising punch for its size. Let's see what that thing can do.

  • Manjaro 21.1.3 GNOME Edition Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    Manjaro Linux is a fast, user-friendly, desktop-oriented operating system based on Arch Linux. Key features include intuitive installation process, automatic hardware detection, stable rolling-release model, ability to install multiple kernels, special Bash scripts for managing graphics drivers and extensive desktop configurability. Manjaro Linux offers Xfce as the core desktop options, as well as KDE, GNOME and a minimalist Net edition for more advanced users. Community-supported desktop flavours are also available.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #229
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More in Tux Machines

CuteFish – An Elegant, Beautiful and Easy-to-Use Linux Desktop

CutefishOS is a new free and open-source desktop environment for Linux operating systems with a focus on simplicity, beauty, and practicality. Its goal is to create a better computing experience for Linux users. Cutefish OS is among the newest kids on the block of desktop environments. And since it has been born at such a time when the KDE aesthetic leads in the UI/UX stand for Linux users, it features a design that is strikingly similar. Given its goal of making a better desktop experience, the team uses KDE Frameworks, KDE Plasma 5, and Qt. My guess is that Qt is the source of its “cute” name. They seem to have collaborated heavily with JingOS, a beautiful Linux OS targeted at Tablets. Read more

Former Microsoft Security Analyst Claims Office 365 Knowingly Hosted Malware For Years

Malware on Windows devices has become a real problem in the last few years, specifically with a recent uptick in ransomware. It appears that Microsoft has been trying to combat this issue, though, with updates to Microsoft Defender, so it has more teeth than ever before. However, what if Microsoft is part of the problem too? On Friday, cybersecurity researcher TheAnalyst explained on Twitter how BazarLoader malware leads to ransomware that can severely affect healthcare, among other industries. He then called out Microsoft, asking if the company has “any responsibility in this when they KNOWINGLY are hosting hundreds of files leading to this,” alongside an image of what appears to be malicious files being hosted in OneDrive. Read more

today's leftovers

  • pam-krb5 4.11

    The primary change in this release of my Kerberos PAM module is support for calling pam_end with PAM_DATA_SILENT. I had not known that the intent of this flag was to signal that only process resources were being cleaned up and external resources should not be (in part because an older version of the man page doesn't make this clear).

  • QB64 Hits Version 2.0, Gets Enhanced Debugging | Hackaday

    Despite the name, BASIC isn’t exactly a language recommended for beginners these days. Technology has moved on, and now most people would steer you towards Python if you wanted to get your feet wet with software development. But for those who got their first taste of programming by copying lines of BASIC out of a computer magazine, the language still holds a certain nostalgic appeal.

  • All Things Open: Diversity Event Today - Big Top Goes Up Monday! - FOSS Force

    By now things are going full tilt boogie in downtown Raleigh, as the All Things Open conference is well into its “pre” day. Keeping with the trend set by other conferences, All Things Open opens a day ahead of time, partially to stage free event’s that aren’t officially a part of the main show, but which offer attendees from out-of-town a reason to fly in a day early to settle in. This is good for the travelling attendees, because they don’t spend the first day suffering for jet lag or other forms of travel fatigue, and good for the event, because it means that more people are in place to fill seats and attend presentations, beginning with the opening keynote. [...] At ATO, the registration desks are open on Sunday from noon until 5:30 Eastern Time, and the pre-conference is a free Inclusion and Diversity Event that started at noon and will run until 5pm, emceed by Rikki Endsley, formally with Red Hat and now a community marketing manager at Amazon Web Services.

  • [Older] Arduino Nano Pros and Cons: Is the Cheapest Arduino Worth It?

    While there is quite an array of Arduino boards to choose from, the Nano is a versatile board suitable for almost all DIY electronic projects. These tiny micro controllers make compact DIY hardware development available to more people than ever before. In the past we have covered reasons you may not want to choose a genuine Arduino for your projects, but today lets take a look at the positives and negatives of the Arduino Nano.

  • Pnevmo-Capsula: Domiki rolls onto Windows, Mac and Linux

    Usually the term "on rails" refers to a highly linear experience over which the player has little control. But sometimes it's meant far more literally than that, as is the case in Pomeshkin Valentin Igorevich's recently released steampunk adventure, Pnevmo-Capsula: Domiki.

  • How to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook in 2021

    Today we are looking at how to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

Digital Restrictions (DRM) on Printers