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Linux-on-NXP boards from Kontron and SolidRun gain Arm SystemReady compliance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Kontron and SolidRun have each announced several NXP-based embedded products that have achieved Arm SystemReady certification for interoperable Linux stacks and boot systems.

Following Arm’s formal announcement of its Arm SystemReady initiative in Oct. 2020, support for the interoperability program has begun to accelerate. Yesterday, Kontron announced three embedded Linux products based on NXP processors that have received Arm SystemReady certification for standardized firmware and hardware running on Arm-based CPUs. The products include its pITX-iMX8M Pico-ITX SBC and sandwich-style BL i.MX8M Mini, as well as a new KBox A-203-LS networking box with an NXP LS1028A.

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Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Hackaday Podcast, A Look at Lubuntu 21.10, and The Linux Gamer (TLG) on Apple

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Hackaday Podcast 145: Remoticon is On, Movie FX, Cold Plasma, and The Purest Silicon

    With literally just hours to go before the 2021 Hackaday Remoticon kicks off, editors Tom Nardi and Elliot Williams still managed to find time to talk about some of the must-see stories from the last week. There’s fairly heavyweight topics on the docket this time around, from alternate methods of multiplying large numbers to the incredible engineering that goes into producing high purity silicon. But we’ll also talk about the movie making magic of Stan Winston and some Pokemon-themed environmental sensors, so it should all balance out nicely. So long as the Russian’s haven’t kicked off the Kessler effect by the time you tune in, we should be good.

  • How to install Lubuntu 21.10 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Lubuntu 21.10.

  • How Apple's self-service repair program reveals that they've lost their way. - Invidious

    Apple revealed their Self Service Repair program allowing their i̶n̶m̶a̶t̶e̶s̶ users to purchase replacement parts for their iPhones and (eventually) their M1-based Macs. I hope they prove me wrong on this, but I find this to be a cynical step on their part. But what I really want to talk about is the design of the artwork on their announcement post. It follows the "Big Tech" art style called "Corporate Memphis" (also referred to as "globohomo," among other terms). Apple's now chasing design trends rather than progressing them. If I didn't know any better I would think this was just another phone manufacturer's website.

Change Desktop Environments on… iOS?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

While Apple’s modern operating systems may seem like they exist independently of the rest of the computing world, they are actually close cousins of modern versions of Linux. The primary link between the two is that Apple’s offerings are Unix-based and even though Linux isn’t Unix in the strict sense, it’s built to be extremely Unix-like. Plenty of Linux software is POSIX-compliant, meaning it is effectively compatible with true Unix. But what can we do with that information? Well, to start, we can run Linux desktop environments on top of an iOS install on your favorite iPhone or iPad.

To be sure, we will be filing this hack in the “because you can” category. [Torrekie], the creator of this project, has plenty of builds (Google translate from Chinese) where the boundaries between things like Linux and Unix are either blurred or nonexistant. In this particular project, a jailbroken iOS device is essentially gifted a ported version of XFCE which is able to run fairly well on iOS thanks to its compatibility with Unix environments. Details on how this was accomplished are sparse without a full investigation of the source code right now, but you can head over to the repository if you are curious enough to try this for yourself. [Torrekie] does note that this will only work with iOS devices that have been jailbroken using the “unc0ver” jailbreak only though.

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EasyOS Development

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Home button fixed in ROX-Filer

    At the top of a ROX-Filer window, there is an icon of a house, mouseover shows "Change to home directory". Clicking that icon changes the window to the /root folder.

  • Mesa now has r600 and radeonsi drivers

    Folder /usr/lib/dri has drivers that provide hardware acceleration for libGL.

  • Package libxres compiled

    I was recently compiling a source package, forget what it was, might have been xfce, it required a dependency 'libxres". OK, it is a small library, might as well include it in the build, so now compiled in OpenEmbedded and added to the EasyOS package-list.

Discover Slitaz, a 50MB Lightweight Desktop Operating System

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Slitaz GNU/Linux is an Swiss computer operating system that is user-friendly, super lightweight and very fast to install, with a spider logo, for both desktop and server. It can run on a quarter of a GB memory. Its installation image is only fifty megabytes, full desktop included, with LiveCD capability. We overview Slitaz in this article with short highlights on where you can get it, available versions and how its desktops and applications are. Happy discovering!

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FSF Giving Guide: Freedom is the greatest gift of all

Filed under
GNU

It seems like the usual holiday sales just get earlier and earlier. Not content with just hammering us with ads, certain megalithic companies named after large rivers or fruits try to foist their "deals" on us as soon as they can. Given the degree to which our lives are mediated by technology, it's no surprise that so many holiday sales focus on "devices," that catch-all name we've given to those computers that run in our pockets, laps, and living rooms. Yet before you cave to pressure, you should make sure that gift isn't putting your friend or family member under unjust control.

For the last twelve years, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has published our Ethical Tech Giving Guide as a way to help concerned individuals make sure that the gift they might plan on giving their loved ones doesn't deprive them of their freedom. It's natural to want the very best gift for that special person in your life. It's also natural to want that gift to last them as long as possible. But if you plan on giving any devices, it's important to carefully consider the gift that you choose and the message it sends. The Amazon Echo or Chromebook that you're buying today has a good chance of being obsolete in the next few years, and more importantly, could set your friend or family member's digital freedom back even longer.

Freedom is the best gift you can give, and the one that keeps on giving. Rather than purchasing that new gadget, we encourage you to take the time to explore installing free software on one your friend or family member already owns. Taking your first steps to freedom often doesn't just help you win back your digital autonomy: it provides an opportunity for you to deepen your relationship with the ones you care about through a shared learning experience, and inaugurates you into a worldwide community of users.

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Arcan 0.6.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Time for another fairly beefy Arcan release. For those thinking in semantic versioning still surprised at the change-set versus version number here (‘just a minor update?’) do recall that as per the roadmap, disregarding the optimistic timeline, we work with release-rarely-build-yourself thematic versions until that fated 1.0 where we switch to semantic and release-often.

On that scale, 0.5.x was the display server role, 0.6.x is focused on the networking layer as the main feature and development driver. 0.7.x will be improving audio and some missing compatibility/3D/VR bits. Then it gets substantially easier/faster – 0.8.x will be optimization and performance. 0.9.x will be security — hardening attack surface, verification of protections, continuous fuzzing infrastructure and so on.

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GNU/Linux Surveillance in the 'Clown' and Linux Foundation Shenanigans

Filed under
GNU
Linux

German state planning to switch 25,000 PCs to LibreOffice (and GNU/Linux)

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux

The north-German state of Schleswig-Holstein plans to switch to open source software, including LibreOffice, in its administration and schools.

In doing so, the state wants to reduce its dependence on proprietary software, and eventually end it altogether. By the end of 2026, Microsoft Office is to be replaced by LibreOffice on all 25,000 computers used by civil servants and employees (including teachers), and the Windows operating system is to be replaced by GNU/Linux.

The necessary steps for this are specified in the planning of the Schleswig-Holstein state parliament (German), as digital minister Jan Philipp Albrecht explains in an interview with c’t (also German – Google Translate version here).

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I Love Arch, But GNU Guix Is My New Distro

Filed under
GNU
Gaming

I wrote recently about building my new gaming desktop where, if you weren’t blinded by all the lights, I also noted that I’ve moved from Arch to GNU Guix as my distro of choice. Why? And what is Guix? (And no, it is just coincidental that Valve is going all-in with Arch on the Deck.)

While I’ll get to details on both below, perhaps the simplest answer to “why” is because I just like tinkering. As I’ve written before, that’s very much at the heart of why I love to use Linux and can’t seem to just let a computer be without messing with it in some way. There’s plenty of good reasons why I think this is valuable (from learning to openness), but perhaps foremost it is fun.

So let me lead with this: Guix, for me, is the most fun I’ve had in Linux in a long time. There are some clear epochs in my Linux life, like being on the bleeding edge as 64-bit went mainstream, compiling kernels (and everything else) on Gentoo, to more recently VFIO and then Proton. Distros in my life have mostly gone from Debian to Gentoo to Arch, to what I think is now my “forever $HOME”: GNU Guix. I’ve always wanted to see what the latest and greatest is: Guix is new and different in a way that truly moves the Linux scene forward.

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Security Leftovers

  • A mysterious threat actor is running hundreds of malicious Tor relays

    Since at least 2017, a mysterious threat actor has run thousands of malicious servers in entry, middle, and exit positions of the Tor network in what a security researcher has described as an attempt to deanonymize Tor users. Tracked as KAX17, the threat actor ran at its peak more than 900 malicious servers part of the Tor network, which typically tends to hover around a daily total of up to 9,000-10,000. Some of these servers work as entry points (guards), others as middle relays, and others as exit points from the Tor network. Their role is to encrypt and anonymize user traffic as it enters and leaves the Tor network, creating a giant mesh of proxy servers that bounce connections between each other and provide the much-needed privacy that Tor users come for. Servers added to the Tor network typically must have contact information included in their setup, such as an email address, so Tor network administrators and law enforcement can contact server operators in the case of a misconfiguration or file an abuse report.

  • Someone Is Running Lots of Tor Relays

    Since 2017, someone is running about a thousand — 10% of the total — Tor servers in an attempt to deanonymize the network...

  • Security updates for Tuesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (nss), Debian (roundcube and runc), openSUSE (aaa_base, brotli, clamav, glib-networking, gmp, go1.16, hiredis, kernel, mozilla-nss, nodejs12, nodejs14, openexr, openssh, php7, python-Babel, ruby2.5, speex, wireshark, and xen), Oracle (kernel and nss), Red Hat (kpatch-patch, nss, rpm, and thunderbird), SUSE (brotli, clamav, glib-networking, gmp, kernel, mariadb, mozilla-nss, nodejs12, nodejs14, openssh, php7, python-Babel, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (busybox, mariadb-10.3, mariadb-10.5, python-django, and samba).

  • Hitachi Energy RTU500 OpenLDAP | CISA

    All information products included in https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ics are provided "as is" for informational purposes only. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not provide any warranties of any kind regarding any information contained within. DHS does not endorse any commercial product or service, referenced in this product or otherwise. Further dissemination of this product is governed by the Traffic Light Protocol (TLP) marking in the header. For more information about TLP, see https://us-cert.cisa.gov/tlp/.

  • Hitachi Energy XMC20 and FOX61x | CISA

    All information products included in https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ics are provided "as is" for informational purposes only. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not provide any warranties of any kind regarding any information contained within. DHS does not endorse any commercial product or service, referenced in this product or otherwise. Further dissemination of this product is governed by the Traffic Light Protocol (TLP) marking in the header. For more information about TLP, see https://us-cert.cisa.gov/tlp/.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Single Node OKD (OpenShift)

    Everytime I get to use Red Hat’s Open Shift I think to myself: “I should use OpenShift more”. It is a really great tool not just for high availability clusters but for general software development also. Its Web interface is super intuitive and nice to use, and you can provision all sorts of stuff in minutes. And everything is open source. Its really great. So naturally I decided to run it locally, especially after the news that starting from version 4.8 you can use it on single node architecture also. I decided to run it virtualized in libvirt so I can destroy it if I no longer needed. Hooray!

  • Fedora on NVIDIA Jetson Xavier – nullr0ute's blog

    The last two years or so I’ve been working with NVIDIA on general distro support including UEFI and ACPI for their Jetson Xavier platforms. Their Xavier platform, except a few quirks, are mostly SystemReady-ES compliant, so having a SBBR compliant firmware goes quite some way to having a widely available, relatively affordable, platform that “just works” for the arm ecosystem. I was very excited to finally have NVIDIA finally release the first version in March this year. This firmware is a standard UEFI firmware based on the open source TianoCore/EDK2 reference firmware, it allows booting in either ACPI or Device-Tree mode and supports all the basic things needed. The ACPI mode is not as fully featured as the Device-Tree mode as yet. In ACPI you get compute (cpu/memory/virt etc), PCIe, USB, network, which is just fine if you’re just looking for standard server or for testing a SystemReady system but there’s no display or accelerator support as yet. The Device-Tree mode is more feature full but both work pretty well with upstream kernels and NVIDIA are improving and upstreaming more things regularly. For flashing with the latest Fedora releases you’ll want the Linux for Tegra (L4T) R32.6.1 release and the latest UEFI firmware (1.1.2 ATM). The R32.6.1 release fixes issues with python3.9 and later so you’ll need that for Fedora. The following will extract everything into a directory called Linux_for_Tegra. Note the release for Xavier is different to the L4T for the TX1/TX2 series of devices such as the nano.

  • An introduction to Red Hat Insights for Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform

    Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform is a framework for building and operating IT automation at scale. The platform includes many of the tools you’ll need to implement automation across your organization, allowing you to simplify and centralize control of your infrastructure. Ansible Automation Platform includes a visual dashboard, role-based access control (RBAC) and automation tools, including Red Hat Insights for Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform.

  • 20 years of Red Hat Product Security: The rise of branded exploits (Part 2)

    In part 1 of this story we traced the history of Red Hat Product Security from its inception in 2001 through to its shift into the Customer Experience and Engagement (CEE) team in 2013. But that was just the beginning...security was always important, of course, but it was about to become front-page news.

  • CentOS Community Newsletter: December 2021

    As we approach the end of 2021, I wanted to thank all of you who have worked so hard this year towards the betterment of the project. This year we've made governance more transparent, welcomed several new SIGs, made big strides in consolidating infrastructure with Fedora where it made sense, and begun to return to in-person events. We could not have done this without the passion and hard work of the project community. Thank you.

5 Honest Reasons To Avoid Switching To Linux

Linux has been a wonderful operating system for many people. It’s free, it’s open source, it’s customizable, secure and much more. We, like many other open source enthusiasts around the world as well, have been trying to convince people to switch to Linux from Windows for many reasons. These reasons should be all known for you by now. But we have to be honest and admit that Linux is not for everybody. There are some specific cases where staying as an avid Windows user could be better for you than switching to Linux, and we’ll be seeing some of these in today’s article. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows/Videos: AlmaLinux OS 8.5, Proxmox Backup Server, Late Night Linux, and More