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New Videos: KDE, German State Moves to Linux, and Google's YouTube Moves Away From Actual Users

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GNU
Linux

5 Websites Every Linux User Should Bookmark

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GNU
Linux

There’s no shortage of Linux websites hyping the trendiest distributions (distros) and dishing on the latest developer drama. To help you cut through the noise, we’ve curated a few sites worth your time that offer relevant news, useful information, or both.

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YouTube Downloader and Firefox in EasyOS

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GNU
Linux
  • YouTube downloader fixes

    The YouTube downloader GUI is a frontend for /usr/bin/youtube-dl, which is a python script. A problem is that YouTube move the goal posts, in an attempt to stop these downloaders from working. The youtube-dl developers respond by changing their script so that it works again.

  • Firefox version 94.0.2

    Have just downloaded English, French and German Firefox 94.0.2 tarballs, and it will be in the next release of EasyOS.

Running Octoprint On A PinePhone Turns Out To Be Pretty Easy

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

3D printer owners have for years benefitted from using Octoprint to help manage their machines, and most people run Octoprint on a Raspberry Pi. [Martijn] made it run on his PinePhone instead, which turned out to be a surprisingly good fit for his needs.

While [Martijn] was working out exactly what he wanted and taking an inventory of what Raspberry Pi components and accessories it would require, it occurred to him that his PinePhone — an open-source, linux-based mobile phone — would be a good candidate for his needs. It not only runs Linux with a touchscreen and camera, but even provides USB, ethernet, and separate DC power input via a small docking bar. It looked like the PinePhone had it all, and he was right. [Martijn]’s project page gives a walkthrough of the exact steps to get Octoprint up and running, and it even turns out to not be particularly difficult.

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NixOS 21.11 released

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GNU
Linux

Hey everyone, we're Timothy DeHerrera and Tom Bereknyei, the release managers for 21.11. As promised, the latest stable release is here: NixOS 21.11 “Porcupine”.

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FPGA SoC modules gain networking carrier and new PolarFire SoC model

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ PE3” carrier for its FPGA/SoC Mercury/Mercury+ modules can act as an SBC or plug into a PC via PCIe x8. It offers QSFP+, 4x SFP+, FireFly, and 2x GbE. We also examine a new “Mercury+ MP1” module based on the RISC-V based PolarFire SoC.

In May, Switzerland based Enclustra announced a Mercury+ ST1 baseboard for its FPGA/SoC powered Mercury and Mercury+ compute modules. These include a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC based Mercury+ XU6 module that was announced at the same time. Now the company has unveiled a more feature-rich Mercury+ PE3 board for the Mercury/Mercury+ product line.

Farther below, we report on a similarly “in development” Mercury+ MP1 module based on Microchip’s based PolarFire SoC, which includes RISC-V based CPU cores and Microchip’s PolarFire FPGA.

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Hardware/Modding: Rapberry Pi, BIOS, RISC-V

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GNU
Linux

  • Buy A Piece Of The Pi? | Hackaday

    The various companies and organisations that supply our community have achieved differing levels of success, with some staying as kitchen-table operations and others reaching the giddy heights of multinational commerce. Perhaps none has risen so far as Raspberry Pi though, as there are reports that the developer of single board computers might be seeking a £400m listing on the London Stock Exchange some time next year. The news is that they have sought the advice of investment bankers over the possibility of a float, seeking to secure further investment to further develop their product portfolio.

    We’re not investment advisers here at Hackaday so we’re not going to suggest whether or not to bet your shirt on Pi shares, instead our interest lies in what this might mean for their family of products. It’s an inevitable process for any start-up that achieves major success that it will over time progress from being directed by vision to being directed by commerce, and perhaps a listing could be the culmination of this process. It’s fair to say that we tinkerers probably represent less of a market than education or industry to the Pi folks, so how might we win or lose when the suits take the helm?

  • What’s The Deal With UEFI?

    The Linux community, generally speaking, is agnostic at best and antagonistic at worst towards UEFI. The BIOS interface is pushing 45 years as of the time of writing and is considered legacy in every sense

  • Open-Source FPGA-Based RISC-V GPGPU That Supports OpenCL 1.2 - Phoronix

    While there was the Libre RISC-V GPU effort aiming to provide an open-source GPU accelerator based on RISC-V, it ultimately turned into Libre-SOC with a focus now on the POWER ISA. Meanwhile Vortex is continuing to mature as an open-source, FPGA-based RISC-V GPGPU processor.

    Vortex is a RISC-V GPGPU currently for FPGA-based implementation with either the Intel Arria 10 or Intel Stratix 10 working. This general purpose GPU makes use of the RISV-V RV32IMF 32-bit ISA and can yield up to 1024 threads at 250MHz.

Taking Stock of Librem 14

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Like many hardware companies, Purism has taken a “Just In Time” manufacturing approach for our products including the Librem laptop line. That means that we make a bit more of a product than we think we need, and schedule the next manufacturing run so that the product arrives in our warehouse “just in time” for us to deplete the previous manufacturing run. In an ideal world that means we never run out of stock, but also never have massive inventories taking up space in our warehouse.

Also like many hardware companies the supply chain woes of the last two years have caused us to rethink this approach. Each time it seemed like we had made enough Librem 14s to catch up to current and projected orders, delays of one kind or another created a new backlog as new orders continued to come in. We’ve decided to scrap “Just in Time” in favor of manufacturing far more Librem 14s than we currently need, and will have our shelves full of Librem 14 stock by the end of the year.

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Chrome OS 98 adds management of multiple Chromebook Linux containers

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GNU
Linux
Google

Earlier this month I reported that Chrome OS was adding multiple container management to Chromebook. The last Dev Channel update has finally brought the first iteration of that feature and I do have it working. At the moment, however, I’ve only been able to add a second Linux container for Debian. Regardless, here’s how Chrome OS 98 adds management of multiple Chromebook Linux containers.

For starters, I had to enable the following experimental flag in Chrome OS 98: chrome://flags#crostini-multi-container and restart my browser. After that, I saw the new “manage extra containers” option in my Linux settings:

Chrome OS 98 multiple Chromebook Linux containers management
Choosing this option brought me to the following screen, which initially had a single container, as expected. Here I could change the color of each one. I clicked the Create button, added a second Debian container, and left it the default color. The three-dot option offers ways to stop or delete a container.

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More about those zero-dot users

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GNU
KDE
Linux

Yesterday’s article about KDE’s target users generated some interesting discussions about the zero-dot users. One of the most insightful comments I read was that nobody can really target zero-dot users because they operate based on memorization and habit, learning a series of cause-effect relationships: “I click/touch this picture/button, then something useful happens”–even with their smartphones! So even if GNOME and ElementaryOS might be simpler, that doesn’t really matter because it’s not much harder to memorize a random-seeming sequence of clicks or taps in a poor user interface than it is in a good one.

I think there’s a lot of truth to this perspective. We have all known zero-dot users who became quite proficient at specific tasks; maybe they learned how to to everything they needed in MS Office, Outlook, or even Photoshop.

The key detail is that these folks rely on the visual appearance and structure of the software remaining the same. When the software’s user interface changes–even for the better–they lose critical visual cues and reference points and they can’t find anything anymore.

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