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New Videos: Endless OS 4.0.0, KDE Plasma Panels, and Enterprise Linux Security

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GNU
Linux
  1. Linux overview | Endless OS 4.0.0 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Endless OS 4.0.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  2. Me And Plasma Panels Are FRIENDS Again! (DEVLOG) - Kockatoo Tube
  3. Enterprise Linux Security Episode 10 - The worst healthcare breaches of 2021 - Invidious

    Joao and Jay talk about the worst healthcare breaches of 2021, and some lessons that can be learned from these events.

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU World Order, Linux Action News, and Free Software Security

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • GNU World Order 437

    Listener feedback. This is the Git hook example. Save it as **.git /hook/pre-commit** in a valid Git repository, and make it executable with **chmod +x .git /hook/pre- commit**. It gets called any time you tell Git to commit a file, and replaces **foo** with **bar** before committing the file.

  • Linux Action News 218

    Industry-changing open-source project releases, and why the new CentOS Stream 9 might be more noteworthy than you realize.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 300 – Apple vs NSO: What can copyright do for you?

    Josh and Kurt talk about Apple suing NSO using a copyright claim as their vehicle. Copyright is often used as a reason to bring lawsuits, even when it doesn’t always make sense. Copyright has been used by open source to expand rights, and many companies to restrict rights. It’s a very odd law sometimes. At the end of the day it seems the only real path forward for a problem like NSO is up to governments to protect their citizens.

Upcoming CutefishOS Could Topple Deepin as the Most Beautiful Linux Distro

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GNU
Linux

CutefishOS is a relatively new Linux distribution that comes bundled with its own desktop environment (i.e., CutefishDE).

It is not yet a stable release, but in its beta phase.

However, with its latest beta release (v0.6), it seems to be shaping up as a promising alternative to the available Linux distributions focusing on simplicity and beauty.

Read more

Gnuastro 0.16 released

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GNU
Dear all,

I am happy to announce the 16th official release of GNU Astronomy
Utilities (Gnuastro version 0.16).

Gnuastro is an official GNU package, consisting of various
command-line programs and library functions for the manipulation and
analysis of (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
links below respectively:

https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

For a complete review of the new/changed features in this release,
please see [1] below (also available in the 'NEWS' file within the
source code tarball).

Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature (*.sig) see [3]:

  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz    (3.7MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz    (5.9MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz.sig (833B)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz.sig (833B)

Here are the SHA1 and SHA256 checksums (other ways to check if the
tarball you download is what we distributed). Just note that the
SHA256 checksum is base64 encoded, instead of the hexadecimal encoding
that most checksum tools default to.

fe1f84bf1be270f1a62091e9a5f89bb94b182154  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
B4hftfYuyc7x3I6aEJ2SQlkp6x7zOOrPz/bK2koGuR8  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
1ae00673648fe8db5630f1de9d70b49fadb42d7d  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz
kMEdJbsFrRNxDLX4EXntgXNgikJv3/2LIEWGLV/e4i0  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz

For this release, Pedram Ashofteh Ardakani, Natáli D. Anzanello,
Sepideh Eskandarlou, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Vladimir Markelov and Zahra
Sharbaf directly contributed to the source of Gnuastro, I am very
grateful to all of them. I should also thank Alejandro Serrano
Borlaff, Fernando Buitrago, Mark Calabretta, Zohreh Ghaffari, Giulia
Golini, Leslie Hunt, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Matthias Kluge, Juan Miro,
Juan Molina Tobar, Markus Schaney, Zahra Sharbaf, Vincenzo Testa,
Ignacio Trujillo and Aaron Watkins for their very good suggestions or
bug reports that have been implemented in Gnuastro 0.16.

If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
be different for different programs, so run it for all the programs
you use). Citations _and_ acknowledgments are vital for the continued
work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget to support us by doing so.

This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
  Texinfo 6.8
  Autoconf 2.71
  Automake 1.16.4
  Help2man 1.48.5
  ImageMagick 7.1.0-9
  Gnulib v0.1-4944-g7fc3219bc
  Autoconf archives v2021.02.19-29-g0fbee2a

The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball on your system
are described here:
  https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html

Best wishes,
Mohammad

Read more

New Videos: Jargon, the 'Bad Linus', and KDE

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GNU
Linux

Sujeevan Vijayakumaran: All-remote workspace at home

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

It’s been a little over 1,5 years since I joined GitLab as my first all remote company. About half a year ago, I wrote about what I learned in one year at GitLab. In this blog post I will describe my setup how I work because I got several questions about it over the last time. I can also blame dnsmichi who published a similar post about his setup Wink.

I can certainly recommend the page about “Considerations for a Productive Home Office or Remote Workspace“ in the GitLab Handbook about All-Remote.

[...]

I used to have Thinkpads in the past, but I recently switched to Dell XPS. I have two Dell XPS 13. One for work (in white) and one private (in black).

While I personally prefer to run ArchLinux (btw I use Arch!) I’m running the latest Ubuntu LTS on my work laptop.

The laptop is connected to a CalDigit TS3-Plus which is my docking station. This was one of the few docking station which supported 4K@60Hz back when I bought this. I would prefer a docking station with more USB-ports. Right now I have another USB-Hub (hidden under the desktop) because the ports provided by most of the docking stations out there are not really enough for me.

Read more

What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on what Linux needs to do better — I have also written a companion article, “How new Linux users can increase their odds of success”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is not accessible to the average user today, and I didn’t need to watch these videos to understand that. I do not think that it is reasonable today to expect a non-expert user to successfully install and use Linux for their daily needs without a “Linux friend” holding their hand every step of the way.

This is not a problem unless we want it to be. It is entirely valid to build software which is accommodating of experts only, and in fact this is the kind of software I focus on in my own work. I occasionally use the racecar analogy: you would not expect the average driver to be able to drive a Formula 1 racecar. It is silly to suggest that Formula 1 vehicle designs ought to accommodate non-expert drivers, or that professional racecar drivers should be driving mini-vans on the circuit. However, it is equally silly to design a professional racing vehicle and market it to soccer moms.

I am one of the original developers of the Sway desktop environment for Linux. I am very proud of Sway, and I believe that it represents one of the best desktop experiences on Linux. It is a rock-solid, high-performance, extremely stable desktop which is polished on a level that is competitive with commercial products. However, it is designed for me: a professional, expert-level Linux user. I am under no illusions that it is suitable for my grandmother.

Read more

How new Linux users can increase their odds of success

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GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on how new Linux users can increase their odds for success — I have also written a companion article, “What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is, strictly speaking, an operating system kernel, which is a small component of a larger system. However, in the common usage, Linux refers to a family of operating systems which are based on this kernel, such as Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch Linux, Alpine Linux, and so on, which are referred to as distributions. Linux is used in other contexts, such as Android, but the common usage is generally limited to this family of Linux “distros”. Several of these distros have positioned themselves for various types of users, such as office workers or gamers. However, the most common Linux user is much different. What do they look like?

The key distinction which sets Linux apart from more common operating systems like Windows and macOS is that Linux is open source. This means that the general public has access to the source code which makes it tick, and that anyone can modify it or improve it to suit their needs. However, to make meaningful modifications to Linux requires programming skills, so, consequentially, the needs which Linux best suits are the needs of programmers. Linux is the preeminent operating system for programmers and other highly technical computer users, for whom it can be suitably molded to purpose in a manner which is not possible using other operating systems. As such, it has been a resounding success on programmer’s workstations, on servers in the cloud, for data analysis and science, in embedded workloads like internet-of-things, and other highly technical domains where engineering talent is available and a profound level of customization is required.

The Linux community has also developed Linux as a solution for desktop users, such as the mainstream audience of Windows and macOS. However, this work is mostly done by enthusiasts, rather than commercial entities, so it can vary in quality and generally any support which is available is offered on a community-run, best-effort basis. Even so, there have always been a lot of volunteers interested in this work — programmers want a working desktop, too. Programmers also want to play games, so there has been interest in getting a good gaming setup working on Linux. In the past several years, there has also been a commercial interest with the budget to move things forward: Valve Software. Valve has been instrumental in developing more sophisticated gaming support on Linux, and uses Linux as the basis of a commercial product, the Steam Deck

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19 Absolute Simple Things About Linux Terminal Every Ubuntu User Should Know

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Terminal often intimidates new users. However, once you get to know it, you gradually start liking it. Well, that happens with most Linux users.

Even if you are using Ubuntu as a desktop system, you may have to enter the terminal at times. New users are often clueless about many things. Some knowledge of basic Linux commands always helps in such cases but this article is not about that.

This article focuses on explaining small, basic and often ignored things about using the terminal. This should help new Ubuntu desktop users to know the terminal and use it with slightly more efficiency.
Read more

New Videos: Python Hate, Learning GNU/Linux, and Common Ways Arch Linux & Rolling Releases Break

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GNU
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

PostgreSQL: pgFormatter v5.2 has been released

Version 5.2 of pgFormatter, a free and reliable tool used to format SQL and PLPGSQL code, has been officially released and is publicly available for download. A demonstration site is available online at http://sqlformat.darold.net/ pgFormatter is the most advanced SQL and PlPgsql code formatter and beautifier dedicated to PostgreSQL. It is provided as a CLI or a CGI program. This is a maintenance release to fix issues reported by users since the last three months. As usual there is also some improvements and new features. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: pgDay Paris 2022 — Call for Papers, Registration, and Sponsors

Tiny four-port net appliance runs Linux on Elkhart Lake

The NCA-1040 runs Linux on Intel’s quad-core, 1.5GHz/3.0GHz Atom x6413E or quad-core, 1.2GHz/3.0GHz Pentium N6415. Both Elkhart Lake processors provide Intel’s new AES-NI instruction set for network security, notes Lanner. The “fanless multi-service gateway” is aimed at “edge environment, branch offices and retail settings for applications such as routing, VoIP, VPN, firewall, IPS/IDS, web filtering, email server, high-volume storage and wireless networking hub,” says the company. Like Aaeon’s very similarly equipped FWS-2280, but unlike the previous Lanner systems, the NCA-1040 supports up to 32GB DDR4 3200 via a single slot. The 4x GbE ports use Intel i211 controllers. There is also an RJ45 console port. Read more

New Videos: Endless OS 4.0.0, KDE Plasma Panels, and Enterprise Linux Security

  1. Linux overview | Endless OS 4.0.0 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Endless OS 4.0.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  2. Me And Plasma Panels Are FRIENDS Again! (DEVLOG) - Kockatoo Tube
  3. Enterprise Linux Security Episode 10 - The worst healthcare breaches of 2021 - Invidious

    Joao and Jay talk about the worst healthcare breaches of 2021, and some lessons that can be learned from these events.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • 6 edge computing trends to watch in 2022 | The Enterprisers Project

    While many aspects of edge computing aren’t new, the overall picture continues to evolve quickly. For example, “edge computing” encompasses the distributed retail store branch systems that have been around for decades. The term has also swallowed all manner of local factory floor and telecommunications provider computing systems, albeit in a more connected and less proprietary fashion than was the historical norm. Edge computing helps IT and business leaders solve problems as both sensor data and machine learning data proliferates. However, even if we see echoes of older architectures in certain edge computing deployments, we also see developing edge trends that are genuinely new or at least quite different from what existed previously. And they’re helping IT and business leaders solve problems in industries ranging from telco to automotive, for example, as both sensor data and machine learning data proliferates.

  • Digital transformation: Are you using the right metrics? | The Enterprisers Project

    For any digital transformation project to succeed, you need a well-laid-out road map, clear objectives, and bite-sized goals to mark the milestones. And it’s important to put those plans into action and measure their success against the pre-defined relevant metrics. The pandemic made the pace of digital transformation a key performance metric by making it urgent for enterprises to embrace and accelerate digital. Now it’s time to think beyond speed and measure the success of digital transformation against metrics that align with business goals.

  • How customers and partners are meeting growing market demands with Red Hat OpenShift and learning resources

    Which came first: the culture or the technology? Many companies are facing this Catch 22 as they modernize to better meet customer demands. It doesn’t have to be one before the other—actually, they should kind of go hand in hand. This month our customer success spotlights, which span from Europe to Southeast Asia, demonstrate how Red Hat helps customers focus on two critical components of success: helping their people learn new skills and implementing new technology. Let’s see how Red Hat OpenShift and Online Partner Enablement Network have helped customers and partners modernize their environments to keep up with growing market demands.

  • Automating host to host VPN tunnels with RHEL System Roles

    In today's world where organizations frequently use multiple cloud providers, datacenters, and systems in edge environments, secure communication between these distributed systems is essential. Host-to-host VPN tunnels allow for encrypted communication between systems, and are frequently used when traffic needs to traverse untrusted networks such as the public internet. While host-to-host VPN tunnels can be implemented on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) manually, this can be time consuming and error-prone. Red Hat introduced the VPN RHEL System Role in RHEL 8.5 to provide an automated solution to implement host-to-host VPN connections, as well as opportunistic mesh VPNs. RHEL System Roles are a collection of Ansible roles and modules that are included in RHEL to help provide consistent workflows and streamline the execution of manual tasks. For more information on VPNs in RHEL, refer to the configuring a VPN with IPsec documentation.

  • Custom WebAssembly extensions in OpenShift Service Mesh

    Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh 2.1 requires using WebAssembly extensions instead of Istio Mixer to extend Service Mesh functionality. The 2.11 release of Red Hat 3scale API Management also supports using WebAssembly extensions. Thus, the latest release of the 3scale integration for Istio uses the WebAssembly proxy instead of the Istio Mixer component. Developers can use WebAssembly extensions in OpenShift Service Mesh and 3scale to add features directly to the Envoy proxy, thereby moving common functionality out of applications and into the sidecar.

  • Boost Apache Camel performance on Quarkus

    Camel Quarkus is a subproject in the Apache Camel community that enables Camel to run on Quarkus. Apache Camel is the most popular open source community project aimed at solving all things integration. Quarkus is a Java framework tailored for OpenJDK HotSpot and GraalVM, boasting lightning-fast boot times and low memory utilization. This article explains how Camel has evolved over time and why it is now embracing Quarkus. I've included a quick getting started guide that will show you how easy it is to create a Camel Quarkus project and experience the significant performance benefits for yourself.