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Development

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

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Development

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps. 

    The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

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  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause.

    Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

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  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels. 

    This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers.

    Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills.

    Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average.

    [...]

    The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

Open Hardware Projects With Arduino

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Development
Hardware
  • Arduino Blog » Transform a pile of clothing into the robot of your nightmares

    While whatever you heard bump in the night was probably nothing to be concerned about, if you see a suspicious blob of clothing on the floor, you might give it another look. Although not particularly dangerous, YouTuber “Sciencish” has come up with a robot that causes a pile of clothes to turn and face, then travel towards the light source you used to check it out.

    The device features four photoresistors, along with an Arduino Uno and two steppers on a robotic chassis for movement. It also accommodates a filament or wire frame on which clothing can rest. When a light is shined at it, the LDRs pick up this “signal” through the clothes. The robot then waits until the lights are off, pauses a bit more, and then rotates to face the person and incrementally advances.

  • Arduino Blog » Say hello to the new Arduino Oplà IoT Kit: Experience the Internet of Things in your hands!

    We’re excited to announce the launch of the Arduino Oplà Kit, the first open programmable IoT platform that allows you to add smart connectivity to the devices around your home or workplace and build custom IoT devices.

    The Oplà IoT Kit contains all the hardware necessary to create eight connected applications, access to an online platform with assembly instructions, and a 12-month subscription to the Arduino Create Maker Plan. This kit is perfect for beginners with basic DIY experience, while more advanced users can leverage it to customize and hack their smart applications and devices, with full control of their data and processes.

Programming/Development Leftovers

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Development
  • The Qt Company Details The Graphics Stack Changes With Qt 6.0

    If all goes well Qt 6.0 will make its official debut in December. One of the areas much talked about for Qt 6 development has been the graphics architecture changes and better supporting more APIs besides OpenGL.

    Qt developer Laszlo Agocs has written a blog post outlining some of the fundamental graphics changes that have made the cut for Qt 6.0...

  • Javascript Confirm Method – Linux Hint

    Javascript is the most known language of the web. Javascript is widely used in front-end development as well as in the back-end. Javascript provides a lot of built-in objects, functions, and methods to help in web development. In this article, we are going to learn one of the javascript’s built-in confirm() method, which is used to show pop-ups over the screen and get the user’s response. The confirm box is a bit different if we try to compare it with the alert box. It is a pop-up that contains a message/text with two buttons, “OK” and “Cancel”. The user won’t be able to do any task while a confirm box is over the screen, and he/she clicks the “OK” or “Cancel” button. This is the reason behind not recommending it’s often used. So, let’s have a look at what is a confirm box and what are the different ways to use it.

    The confirm() is basically a method, which is used to show a pop-up box over the web page, and it contains a message or text and two buttons, “OK” & “Cancel”. On the click of the “OK” button, the confirm method returns “true”. Similarly, on the click of the “Cancel” button, it returns false.

  • Applying JavaScript’s Splice Function – Linux Hint

    JavaScript is a lightweight programming language, and as with any programming language, when developing JavaScript programs, we often need to work with arrays to store data. In this article, we will introduce JavaScript’s built-in splice function and discuss how we can use it to manipulate an array. As data are generated, the structures used for storage must be updated. For this reason, a programmer must often add elements to or remove elements from an array.

  • Javascript Trim String – Linux Hint

    Javascript is a scripting or programming language, which is used both on the client-side and back-end of the web. Just like any other language, strings are an important type of the variables, and we often need to manipulate or alter strings as per our needs. While getting data from the user in the form fields, a programmer has to take care of a lot of things. In this article, we will have a look at javascript’s trim() function. We will learn how this function helps in beautifying the strings in javascript and how can we get rid of extra spaces. So, let’s take a look at what is a string and how we can trim the strings.

  • Exploring ELF files using pyelftools | by Roman Storozhenko | Oct, 2020 | Medium

    There are many tools for exploring executable files of ELF format. Most of them intended for providing sole piece of information extracted from a binary in the mentioned format. They are great, but sometimes we need a kind of an universal and yet highly specialized tool allowing to do much more than standard tools are able to. This is a moment when pyelftools come into play.
    In this article I would like to show some usage examples of of pyelftools. I don’t show how to use pyelftools itself, that is, its classes and other features, as you can find it in the documentation and source code itself. Instead I concentrate on applications of this tool for particular purposes.

  • How to Get Current Date & Time in JavaScript? – Linux Hint

    Javascript has become a massively used programming language due to the expansion of the internet and the web at an unbelievable pace. In the modern world of the web, we can do almost every task in one single browser, and Javascript is used in every single website we see in our daily routine life. We frequently used to see the date and time at almost every website. In this article, we are going to have a look at how we can get the current time in Javascript and what are the different ways to get the date and time according to our requirement.

    Javascript provides a built-in object Date, which helps in managing all the date and time. Later, we can extract whatever we want according to our needs using different built-in methods. So, let’s just straight jump into the process and learn the different techniques to extract the current date and time.

  • How to use PHP Null Coalescing Operator – Linux Hint

    The null coalescing operator (??), one of the new features of PHP 7, can be used as an alternative to the ternary operator and isset() function. It is used to check whether a value is assigned to a variable, and it returns a default value when no value is defined for a variable. This operator can also be used to see if $_GET[] and $_POST[], which receive user inputs, are set. Furthermore, it can check the value of more than one variable via chaining.

    In this article, the differences between the ternary and null coalescing operators are discussed, and the null coalescing operator is used as an alternative to the ternary operator and isset() function.

  • Seaborn Scatter Plot - Tutorial and Examples

    In this tutorial, we'll go over how to plot a scatter plot in Seaborn and Python. We'll go over simple plotting examples, as well as multi-faceted plotting of multiple plots and 3D plots using Seaborn and Matplotlib.

  • What Does "if __name__ == __main__:"" Do in Python?

    if __name__ == "__main__" is used to control the behavior of our Python code when it's executed directly or imported as a module. This tutorial explains how.

  • Python round() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is a very versatile high-level programming language that is most widely used in Data Sciences, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence. Python provides great support through built-in modules and functions where we need to play with the numbers. The Python round() function rounds off the floating-point number to the stated number of decimals and returns it.For example, we have a floating-point number 6.677, and we need to round it off to the 2 decimal points, then the round() function will do the job and round off the number to 6.68.

Programming Leftovers

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Development

  • Graphics in Qt 6.0: QRhi, Qt Quick, Qt Quick 3D

    Last year we had a three part blog series about Qt's new approach to working with 3D graphics APIs and shading languages: part 1, part 2, part 3. For Qt Quick, an early, opt-in preview of the new rendering architecture was shipped in Qt 5.14, with some improvements in Qt 5.15. With the release of Qt 6.0 upcoming, let's see what has happened since Qt 5.15. It will not be possible to cover every detail of the graphics stack improvements for Qt Quick here, let alone dive into the vast amount of Qt Quick 3D features, many of which are new or improved in Qt 6.0. Rather, the aim is just to give an overview of what can be expected from the graphics stack perspective when Qt 6.0 ships later this year.

  • Multi-Layer Perceptron & Backpropagation - Implemented from scratch

    Writing a custom implementation of a popular algorithm can be compared to playing a musical standard. For as long as the code reflects upon the equations, the functionality remains unchanged. It is, indeed, just like playing from notes. However, it lets you master your tools and practice your ability to hear and think.

    In this post, we are going to re-play the classic Multi-Layer Perceptron. Most importantly, we will play the solo called backpropagation, which is, indeed, one of the machine-learning standards.

    As usual, we are going to show how the math translates into code. In other words, we will take the notes (equations) and play them using bare-bone numpy.

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  • PyDev of the Week: William Horton

    This week we welcome William Horton (@hortonhearsafoo) as our PyDev of the Week! William is a Backend Engineer at Compass and has spoken at several local Python conferences. He is a contributor to PyTorch and fastai.

    Let’s spend some time getting to know William better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    A little about myself: people might be surprised about my educational background–I didn’t study computer science. I have a bachelors in the social sciences. So by the time I finished undergrad, the most programming I had done was probably doing regressions in Stata to finish my thesis. I decided against grad school, and instead signed up for a coding bootcamp (App Academy) in NYC. The day I’m writing this, September 28, is actually 5 years to the day that I started at App Academy.

    Since then I’ve worked at a few different startups in NYC, across various industries: first investment banking, then online pharmacy, and now real estate. I’m currently a senior engineer on the AI Services team at Compass, working on machine learning solutions for our real estate agents and consumers.

    I like to spend my free time on a few different hobbies. I’m a competitive powerlifter, so I like to get into the gym a few times a week (although with the pandemic in NYC I didn’t lift for six months or so). I’ve actually found powerlifting to be a pretty common hobby among software engineers. Every time someone new joined my gym, it seemed like they came from a different startup. I love to play basketball. And I’m passionate about music: I’ve been a singer almost my whole life, and most recently was performing with an a cappella group in NYC. And in the last year I’ve picked up the guitar, after not touching it since I was a teenager, and that has been very fulfilling.

  • Malayalam fonts: Beyond Latin font metrics | Soliloquies

    This year’s annual international conference organized by TeX Users Group — TUG2020 — was held completely online due to the raging pandemic. In TUG2020, I have presented a talk on some important Malayalam typeface design factors and considerations.

    The idea and its articulation of the talk originated with K.H. Hussain, designer of well-known fonts such as Rachana, Meera, Meera Inimai, TNJoy etc. In a number of discussions that ensued, this idea was developed and later presented at TUG2020.

    Opening keynote to TUG2020 was delivered by Steve Matteson, about the design of Noto fonts. He mentioned that Noto was originally envisaged to be developed as a single font containing all Unicode scripts; but that was changed due to a couple of reasons: (1) huge size of resulting font and (2) the design of many South/South-East Asian characters do not fit well within its Latin font metrics.

  • Jérôme Gardou hired full-time to work on the memory manager

    I proudly announce that ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired Jérôme Gardou to work full-time on the ReactOS kernel’s memory manager for the next 3 months.

    Jérôme is a ReactOS veteran who has been contributing to the project since 2009. He has deep expertise into nearly all parts of ReactOS, ranging from various user-mode components (mostly related to low-level graphics) over their kernel-mode counterparts and down to bare-metal components like the kernel memory manager.

    During the upcoming months, Jérôme is going to overhaul the Mm (Memory Manager) and Cc (Cache Controller) components of the kernel. Both of them are core parts of the operating system, which are involved in every memory request and file operation. Improving them is expected to have a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS.

  • "Open-Source Windows" ReactOS To See Improved Memory Management - Phoronix

    ReactOS Deutschland e.V. has hired one of their long-time contributors to work full-time on the "open-source Windows" implementation's memory management for the next quarter.

    ReactOS is funding longtime contributor Jérôme Gardou to work full-time for the next three months on the open-source operating system's memory manager and cache controller code within its kernel.

    ReactOS hopes this overhaul to the MM/CS code will yield "a substantial effect on the overall stability and performance of ReactOS."

Programming: Cutelyst, C/C++, Perl and Python

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Development
  • Cutelyst 2.13 and ASql 0.19 released – Dantti's Blog

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework and ASql the ASync SQL library for Qt applications got new versions.

    Thanks to the work on ASql Cutelyst got some significant performance improvements on async requests, as well as a new class called ASync, which automatically detaches the current request from the processing chain, and attaches later on when it goes out of scope.

    With the ASync class you capture it on your ASql lambda and once the query result arrives and the lambda is freed and the ASync object gets out of scope and continues the processing action chain.

  • LLVM Lands Very Basic Support For AMD Zen 3 CPUs

    While AMD has landed Znver3 support in GNU Binutils, the company hasn't yet sent out patches for either the GCC or LLVM/Clang compilers in setting up the Zen 3 target with its new instructions or optimized scheduling model / cost table. But a basic implementation has been merged to LLVM for allowing "-march=znver3" based on the limited public details thus far.

    Merged to mainline LLVM 12 yesterday was a basic implementation allowing for -march=znver3 targeting that basically flips on the new instructions known to be supported by Zen 3. Beyond Zen 2, it flips on INVPCID, PKU, VAES, and VPCLMULQDQ. There are also a few other instructions supported by Zen 3 as outlined in this earlier article.

  • CY's Take on PWC#083 | Moments on Perl or other Programming Issues [blogs.perl.org]

    I found that I use "and/or" quite frequently in writing. I know, (mathematical-)logically we only need "or". It seems to me to be a language tricky part as the use of gender neutral terms.

  • Warning about Python3 update in latest -current | Alien Pastures

    Warning for people running Slackware-current and have 3rd party packages installed (who doesn’t) that depend on Python3. That includes you who are running KDE Plasma5!

    The “Sun Oct 25 18:05:51 UTC 2020” update in Slackware-current comes with a bump in the Python3 version (to 3.9) which is incompatible with software which already has been compiled against an older version of Python3 (like 3.8).

    I found 26 of my own packages on my laptop that depend on Python3 and they are all probably going to break when upgrading to the latest slackware-current. This includes Plasma5 ‘ktown’ packages but also several of my DAW packages.

Red Hat's Tom Stellard Now Serving As LLVM Release Manager

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Development
Red Hat

After six years serving as the LLVM release manager and taking over the role from LLVM founder Chris Lattner, Google's Hans Wennborg has stepped down from his position and handed it over to Red Hat's Tom Stellard.

Wennborg announced this week that after six years and twelve major LLVM releases, he is stepping down as LLVM release manager to devote the time to other activities.

Read more

Also: IBM Hopes to Double Sales at Red Hat in Next Three Years

Programming: RISC-V Dev Board, JS, Bash and More

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Development

  • BL602 IoT SDK and $5 DT-BL10 WiFi & BLE RISC-V development board

    Go to Doiting_BL/docs/html folder and then open index.html in your browser to access the documentation. The SDK works both in Windows and Linux and relies on either Eclipse & OpenOCD or Freedom Studio & OpenOCD. A graphical software called Dev Cube is used for flashing the board.

    The documentation is made for a specific board Doit.am DT-BL10 development board powered by BL602 WiSoC that sells for $5 plus shipping on Aliexpress or 19.99 RMB on Taobao (about $3). We’re not at ESP8266 board price level ($2+) yet, but still affordable and interesting for evaluation.

  • Javascript Redirect – Linux Hint

    Javascript is a web-oriented programming language. When using the web, you will often need to navigate through pages. When you click on any button, submit a form, or log in to any website, you get redirected to a different new page. Page redirection is an essential part of any website, but it is not only restricted to page navigation on a website. 

  • JavaScript Sleep Function – Linux Hint

    Javascript is the language of freedom yet is a function-oriented language at the same time. Unlike other languages, javascript does not provide a built-in sleep() function. You can either build a custom sleep() function using the built-in setTimeout() function, or the latest ECMAScript promises an async-await function. This article shows you how to stop or pause the execution of the sleep function for a desired amount of time using promises or async-await functions.

  • 3 Hour Bash Tutorial – Linux Hint

    In this article, you will learn from printing a simple “Hello World” to using conditional statements such as if statements, case statements to using loops such as while, for until loops to awk, grep, sed, and debugging bash scripts. We will cover the following topics in this article:

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  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.27: Build fix

    Exactly one week after the previous release 0.6.26 of digest, a minor cleanup release 0.6.27 just arrived on CRAN and will go to Debian shortly.

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at one million monthly downloads, 282 direct reverse dependencies and 8068 indirect reverse dependencies, or just under half of CRAN) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

Python Programming

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Development

  • Only Python: Friendly-traceback: work in progress

    It's been almost two months since my last blog post and I feel guilty of not haven't taken the time to write more regularly.  I should really tell you about how fantastic Will McGugan's Rich is, and how I have customized it for my projects. I should also tell you how Sylvain Desodt's DidYouMeanPython has been influencing Friendly-traceback latest developments. Also worthy of note is how Alex Hall's FutureCoder project is incorporating so many neat tools that it feels like a real honour that he has incorporated Friendly-traceback in it.

    Alas, while I have been busy making many changes and addition to the code, the documentation is hopelessly behind and no longer gives a correct picture of what Future-traceback is now capable of.

    So much to do, so little time. So, I will just end with a picture, and go back to coding, with a promise of writing more ... soon I hope.

  • Python range() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is a modern, general-purpose, and high-level programming language that comes with powerful features. Python has many built-in modules to support diverse operations. The range() function is a built-in function used to perform specific tasks or actions for a definite number of times. In other words, the range() function is used to perform a task iteratively. This function is used in conjunction with the for loop and the while loop.

  • Python Dictionaries – Linux Hint

    Python is an efficient and versatile programming language. It is one of the most frequently used high-level programming languages to perform data-related tasks due to its many supportive built-in modules and functions. To mention some of its many built-in data structures, it has arrays, lists, tuples, etc.

    Dictionaries are one of the built-in data structures in Python. It holds the data in the form of a key-value pair. The keys are the unique value that acts as a representative of data. The key is also called as “an index value”. Data structures are a very important aspect of any programming language. They are used to store and manipulate the data in a well-organized and efficient way. Therefore, Python dictionaries are more useful when we need to store the data in a form of key-value pair and to access the data faster. The Python dictionaries return the data faster because the key value for every data is unique, therefore the searching time for data is reduced, and we get the result faster. This article explicates the Python dictionaries in detail.

  • Python Classes – Linux Hint

    Python is one of the multiuse high-level programming languages. It is an object-oriented programming language. The main difference between the procedural and object-oriented programming languages is that we cannot create the classes in procedural programming languages. The main focus of procedural languages is on creating functions, and variables for performing the task whereas, in object-oriented programming languages, our main concern is to create objects and use them for performing our tasks. A class is simply a blueprint that contains functions and variables. A class is like a real-life classroom of any institute. It contains some chairs, tables, desks, a projector, walls, etc. base on all these components; we build a classroom. All these components are the variables and functions in a class, and a classroom is an object. The Python classes and objects are explained in this article.

  • FreeBSD process environ and resource limits

    New psutil 5.7.3 is out. This release adds support for 2 functionalities which were not available on BSD platforms: the ability to get the process environment (all BSD) and to get or set process resource limits (FreeBSD only), similarly to what can be done on Linux.

     

Programming Leftovers

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Development

     

  • RcppSpdlog 0.0.3: New features and much more docs

    A good month after the initial two releases, we are thrilled to announce relase 0.0.3 of RcppSpdlog. This brings us release 1.8.1 of spdlog as well as a few local changes (more below).

    RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovic.

    This version of RcppSpdlog brings a new top-level function setLogLevel to control what events get logged, updates the main example to show this and to also make the R-aware logger the default logger, and adds both an extended vignette showing several key features and a new (external) package documentation site.

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  • Hacktoberfest Mauritius 2020

    Saamiyah pinged me a few days ago about the Hacktoberfest event that she was organising and asked whether I would be free to present a topic. Sure, why not?

    As many tech meetups at the moment, the Hacktoberfest event also was virtual. It was hosted on the Jitsi instance of the Mauritius Software Craftsmanship Community. The event was scheduled to start at 19h30 on Friday, i.e last evening. I was late to join but "luckily" so was everybody.

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  • Meet the 24-year-old who’s tracking every broken McDonald’s ice-cream machine in the US

                     

                       

    It turned out to be harder than he’d thought. Initially, he created an API that attempted to add a McSundae from every McDonald’s location to its cart once every minute. The app figured out what he was up to and blocked him — “It was like, you can’t do this, you look like a bot,” he recalled.

                       

    After a night of trial and error, Zahid figured out the magic time frame. Now, his bot attempts to add a McSundae every 30 minutes. If the bot successfully adds the item, it lets McBroken know that the location’s machine is working. If it can’t, the location gets a red dot. (A Twitter user claiming to be a McDonald’s employee has confirmed that the method works.)

  • Robbi Nespu: Fedora - KDE development journey (Qt5X11Extras)
  • Robbi Nespu: Fedora - KDE development journey (Qt5UiPlugin)
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 83: Words Length and Flip Array

    These are some answers to the Week 83 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Four Features That Justify a New Unix Shell

    This post elaborates on these points. I've condensed the rationale into four critical features for the OSH language.

    I give examples of each feature, link to docs (in progress), and comment on the future of the project.

  • Node.js 15.0 Is Released - LinuxReviews

    Support for the QUIC protocol, a new AbortController class, a updated N-API with new methods for managing ArrayBuffers, V8 updated to version 8.6 and NPM updated to version 7.0 are among the highlights in the latest Node.js framework for creating JavaScript-based network services like web servers, chat servers and all kinds of real-time applications.

    [...]

    Node.js 15.0 is a "regular" support release with support throughout June 2021. Node.js uses even numbers for LTS releases. The Node.js 14.x branch is the corrent "Long Term Support" branch with support throughout April 2023 and the older Node.js 12.x will be supported until April 2022. The 10.x branch will go EOL in April 2021.

  • The 20 Best Java Courses for Beginners and Experienced Programmers

    When it comes to creating computer applications that can also be run in a network among distributed servers and clients, Java is still the most powerful programming language available. You can also build a small scale application module commonly known as an applet with Java.

  • OpenJ9 0.23 Released As Latest Eclipse Java Virtual Machine

    Version 0.23 of the Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine was released this week in continuing to focus on being a high performance, open-source JVM.

Python Programming

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Development

  • 4 Best Free Python-Based Content Management Systems - LinuxLinks

    A web content management system (WCMS) is software designed to simplify the publication of Web content. In particular, it enables content creators to submit content without requiring technical knowledge of HTML or the uploading of files. A CMS is most commonly used in creating an intranet or in establishing a presence on the Web.

    This type of software that keeps track of every piece of content on a Web site. Content can be simple text, photos, music, video, documents, or just about anything you can think of. A major advantage of using a CMS is that it requires almost no technical skill or knowledge to manage.

    Not only do content management systems help website users with content editing, they also take care of a lot of “behind the scenes” work such as automatically generating navigation elements, making content searchable and indexable, keeping track of users, their permissions and security setting, and much more.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of the best Python-based WCMS. They are all free and open source software. Here’s our recommendations.

  • 3 Open Source Python Shells - LinuxLinks

    Python is a high-level, general-purpose, structured, powerful, open source programming language that is used for a wide variety of programming tasks. It features a fully dynamic type system and automatic memory management, similar to that of Scheme, Ruby, Perl, and Tcl, avoiding many of the complexities and overheads of compiled languages. The language was created by Guido van Rossum in 1991, and continues to grow in popularity.

    Python is a very useful and popular computer language. One of the benefits of using an interpreted language such as Python is exploratory programming with its interactive shell. You can try out code without having to write a script. But there are limitations with the Python shell.

    Fortunately, there are some excellent alternative Python shells that extend on the basic shell. They each offer a good interactive Python experience.

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  • NumFOCUS Earns Transparency Recognition from GuideStar - NumFOCUS

    NumFOCUS recently earned a Silver Seal of Transparency from GuideStar in recognition of our accountability and transparency efforts.

  • Translating Web Page while Scraping

    Suppose you need to translate web page while scraping data from the website in R and Python. In google chrome, there is an option (or functionality) to translate any foreign language. If you are an english speaker and don't know any other foreign language and you want to extract data from the website which does not have option to convert language to English, this article would help you how to perform translation of a webpage.

  • Getting Started With Python Package Managers
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxlvii) stackoverflow python report
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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps.  The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

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  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause. Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

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  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels.  This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers. Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills. Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average. [...] The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice

Games: Monster Prom, Möbius Front '83 and League Of Legends

  • The absurd multiplayer dating sim Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp is out now | GamingOnLinux

    I will admit that the original Monster Prom is something special as it remains as the only dating sim type of game I've enjoyed, and now there's a brand new helping of it out with Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp. The original was an unexpected pleasure for me, as a genre I've rarely been able to enjoy. Let's face it, "In Monster Prom I was rejected even after letting a princess ride me", is not a typical GamingOnLinux headline. Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp was funded thanks to a Kickstarter campaign back in 2019, and it has released as of October 23 along with full Linux support as expected. Developer Beautiful Glitch mentioned how they've pretty much taken all that was tasty from the original, and threw in some spices to make Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp.

  • Möbius Front '83 is a tactical turn-based strategy game from Zachtronics | GamingOnLinux

    Releasing with Linux support on November 5 is Möbius Front '83 latest title from Zachtronics (SpaceChem, Infinifactory, Opus Magnum, Eliza). Unlike most of their previous titles, it's not a puzzle game. They say it's actually a conventional strategy game designed from scratch by the clever minds at Zachtronics, so it will have their own special feel to it. "The year is 1983 and the United States of America must defend itself from an enemy it could have never imagined— an America from an alternate universe that will stop at nothing to seize control of the country’s heartland!"

  • How to play League of Legends on Linux | FOSS Linux

    League Of Legends is a game made into a snap, meaning that the software package can be installed and executed across different Linux distributions. Being among the largest footprints of any game in streaming media communities on platforms like Twitch and YouTube, installing it in your Linux system will be great. For our case, we will install it in Ubuntu distro.