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GNOME

GNOME Feeds is a Simple RSS Reader for Linux Desktops

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GNOME

Feedreader, Liferea, and Thunderbird are three of the most popular desktop RSS readers for Linux, but now there’s a new option on the scene.

GNOME Feeds app is simple, no-frills desktop RSS reader for Linux systems. It doesn’t integrate or sync with a cloud-based service, like Feedly or Inoreader, but you can import a list of feeds via an .opml file.

“Power” users of RSS feeds will likely find that GNOME Feeds a little too limited for their needs. But the lean feature set is, arguably, what will make this app appeal to more casual users.

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Welcome to the August 2019 Friends of GNOME Update!

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GNOME

Neil, Molly, and Rosanna went to OSCON, in Portland, OR. While there, we met with people from other free software projects and companies developing open source, or with open source programs offices. Following OSCON, there was the West Coast Hackfest, during which the Documentation, GTK, and Engagement teams met and got a bunch of work done. There are some photos you can check out on our Twitter account.

Molly attended FrOSCon, giving a keynote entitled “Open Source Citizenship for Everyone!” On September 17th, Molly will be at GitLab Commit in Brooklyn, NY.

Federico Mena will be at CCOSS in Guadalajara, México, September 14 – 15th. There he will run a workshop on GNOME and deliver a keynote presentation.

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Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

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GNOME

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go!

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Linux Virtual Machine App GNOME Boxes Has An Awesome Time-Saving Feature You Should Know About

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

Not only did GNOME Boxes automatically detect that the ISO contained Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, it offered me an Express Install option (provided I had a working internet connection). The app automatically pulled my username into the account field, and asked that I do nothing more than enter a password to proceed.

And that was truly all that it required, unless I needed to customize the amount of RAM and disk space allocated to the VM.

After hitting the Continue button, GNOME Boxes ran an unattended installation. It pulled regional and language settings from my host machine, handled the partitioning dialogue, and everything else. The installation screens zoomed by, components and updates were downloaded, and within less than 5 minutes I had a perfectly working Ubuntu 18.04 to play with.

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Meet the GNOMEies: Max Huang

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Interviews
GNOME

Max Huang has been GNOME since 2010, starting with forming a GNOME users group in Taiwan. Max has a story you may understand: being a user, meeting the right person, and slowly finding yourself more and more deeply involved with a community in terms of working together and making friends.

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GNOME 3.33.91 released

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GNOME

Hi developers,

GNOME 3.33.91 is now available. This is the second beta version towards 3.34.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.91/gnome-3.33.91.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.91/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.91/sources/

WARNING!
--------
This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
status.

For more information about 3.33, and the full schedule, please see our
3.33 wiki page:

https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable

Cheers,

Abderrahim Kitouni
GNOME Release Team

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Also: GNOME 3.34 Beta 2 Brings Last Minute Improvements To GNOME Shell, Mutter & Friends

Librem 5 August Update

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
Gadgets

We are preparing everything for the Librem 5 to be delivered soon, and its software will focus on the most critical applications a phone needs: calls, messages and web browsing. There are supporting projects that will be delivered too, like GNOME Settings, the shell, GNOME Initial Setup, and GNOME Contacts. So without further ado, let’s take a tour through the software we will deliver–as well as some other applications that have seen some major changes.

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GNOME Developers: Microsoft Stifling the Competition and GStreamer/Graphene

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GNOME
  • Musings on the Microsoft Component Firmware Update (CFU) Protocol

    CFU has a bazaar pre-download phase before sending the firmware to the microcontroller so the uC can check if the firmware is required and compatible. CFU also requires devices to be able to transfer the entire new transfer mode in runtime mode. The pre-download “offer” allows the uC to check any sub-components attached (e.g. other devices attached to the SoC) and forces it to do dep resolution in case sub-components have to be updated in a specific order.

    Pushing the dep resolution down to the uC means the uC has to do all the version comparisons and also know all the logic with regard to protocol incompatibilities. You could be in a position where the uC firmware needs to be updated so that it “knows” about the new protocol restrictions, which are needed to update the uC and the things attached in the right order in a subsequent update. If we always update the uC to the latest, the probably-factory-default running version doesn’t know about the new restrictions.

    The other issue with this is that the peripheral is unaware of the other devices in the system, so for instance couldn’t only install a new firmware version for only new builds of Windows for example. Something that we support in fwupd is being able to restrict the peripheral device firmware to a specific SMBIOS CHID or a system firmware vendor, which lets vendors solve the “same hardware in different chassis, with custom firmware” problem. I don’t see how that could be possible using CFU unless I misunderstand the new .inf features. All the dependency resolution should be in the metadata layer (e.g. in the .inf file) rather than being pushed down to the hardware running the old firmware.

  • Emmanuele Bassi: Another layer

    Five years (and change) ago I was looking at the data types and API that were needed to write a 3D-capable scene graph API; I was also learning about SIMD instructions and compiler builtins on IA and ARM, as well as a bunch of math I didn’t really study in my brush offs with formal higher education. The result was a small library called Graphene.

    Over the years I added more API, moved the build system from Autotools over to Meson, and wrote a whole separate library for its test suite.

    In the meantime, GStreamer started using Graphene in its GL element; GTK 3.9x is very much using Graphene internally and exposing it as public API; Mutter developers are working on reimplementing the various math types in their copies of Cogl and Clutter using Graphene; and Alex wrote an entire 3D engine using it.

12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

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GNOME

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.

We've covered GNOME extensions at Opensource.com before, but to celebrate GNOME's 22nd anniversary, I decided to revisit the topic. Some of these extensions may already be installed, depending on your Linux distribution; if not, check your package manager.

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Also: Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

GNOME: GNOME Shell & Mutter, Gnome MPV (Celluloid), Savestates Manager

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GNOME
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Reach The 3.34 Beta Milestone With Last-Minute Changes

    Earlier this week was the GNOME 3.34 beta release that also marked the UI/feature/API/ABI freezes for this six month update to the GNOME desktop The GNOME Shell and Mutter are late to the party but on Friday evening saw their 3.33.90 (3.34 beta) releases.

    GNOME Shell saw support added for DnD app picker folder management, clocks/weather integration support for sandboxed applications, support for start-up via systemd user instances, replacing Tweener with Clutter animations, consistent animation of new window actions, and a variety of bug fixes.

  • Gnome MPV 0.17 Released! It’s Renamed to ‘Celluloid’

    By releasing version 0.17, the GTK+ frontend for mpv Gnome MPV is officially renamed to Celluloid.

  • Towards a happy ending

    A very important bug/regression that I’m glad we were able to fix is the NintendoDS crash that was caused by introducing the Savestates Manager. We couldn’t have included this feature in a release as long as this bug was present since it was a major regression as the user wasn’t even able to start a NintendoDS game at all.

    The bug was caused by the fact that we used to re-instantiate the emulator core everytime we would start the game or load a new savestate. This didn’t cause any problems with other cores but it seems that the NintendoDS core didn’t like this.

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