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GNOME

How GNOME uses Git

Filed under
GNOME

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance. In my time with GNOME, I’ve been asked for my GitLab a lot.

We use GitLab for basically everything. In a typical day, I get several issues and reference bug reports, and I occasionally need to modify a file. I don’t do this in the capacity of being a developer or a sysadmin. I’m involved with the Engagement and Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) teams. I write newsletters for Friends of GNOME and interview contributors to the project. I work on sponsorships for GNOME events. I don’t write code, and I use GitLab every day.

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10 Ways to Customize Your Linux Desktop With GNOME Tweaks Tool

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

There are several ways you can tweak Ubuntu to customize its looks and behavior. The easiest way I find is by using the GNOME Tweak tool. It is also known as GNOME Tweaks or simply Tweaks.

I have mentioned it numerous time in my tutorials in the past. Here, I list all the major tweaks you can perform with this tool.

I have used Ubuntu here but the steps should be applicable to any Linux distribution using GNOME desktop environment.

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Hubert Figuiere on Flatpak and Flathub, GLib 2.63.1 Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Getting a stack trace out of a Flatpak

    So, the flatpak application you use just crashed

    How do you report it? If you file a bug just saying it crashed, the developers will probably ask for some stack trace. On Fedora 30, for example, abrt (the crash reporting system) doesn't provide any useful information. Let's see if we can extract that information.

    We are gonna have to use the terminal to use some command line tools. Flatpak has a tool flatpak-coredumpctl to use the core dump in the flatpak sandbox. The core dump is an image of the program memory when it crashed that will contain a lot about the crash. But by default the tool will not be able to provide much useful info. There is some initial setup need to be able to have a better output.

    First you must make sure that you have the right Debug package for the right version of the Flatpak runtime. Well, actually, for the corresponding SDK.

  • Music, Flathub and Qt

    I quickly realised that trying these apps on my Dell XPS 13 was really an adventure, mostly because of HiDPI (the high DPI screen that the PS 13 has). Lot of the applications found on Fedora, by default, don't support high DPI and a thus quasi impossible to use out of the box. Some of it is fixable easily, some of it with a bit more effort and some, we need to try harder.

    Almost all the apps I have tried used Qt. With Qt5 the fix is easy, albeit not necessarily user friendly. Just set the QT_AUTO_SCREEN_SCALE_FACTOR environment variable to 1 as specified in Qt HiDPI support documentation. There is also an API to set the attribute on the QCoreApplication object. There must be a good reason why this opt-in and not opt-out.

    [...]

    In the end, I have Hydrogen available on Flathub, the three others in queue for Flathub, and all have had patches submitted (with Muse3 and Rosegarden already merged upstream).

  • g_warning_once() in GLib 2.63.1

    GLib 2.63.1 will be released in the next few weeks, and will contain a fun new API to slightly simplify emitting a warning once, and then shutting up to avoid emitting loads of log spam.

Cast To TV v11 GNOME Chromecast Extension Adds Remote Widget Playlist, GNOME Shell 3.34 Support

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GNOME

Cast to TV, a GNOME Shell extension to cast media (with optional transcoding) to Chromecast and other devices over the local network, was updated to version 11 yesterday. This release brings support for the latest GNOME 3.34, a file queue (playlist) for the remote widget, NVENC hardware acceleration support, and more.

Cast to TV is a GNOME Shell extension to cast videos, music and pictures to Chromecast or other devices over a local network. It supports video transcoding on the fly (for videos that can't directly play on the device), customizable subtitles, it can show a music visualizer while casting music, and much more. For controlling the device, the Gnome Shell extensions adds a new button on the top panel with playback controls.

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GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.34.1 Deliver On Their Prominent Fixes

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GNOME

There weren't out in time for yesterday's formal GNOME 3.34.1 point release, but GNOME Shell and Mutter have out their prominent point releases today that are exciting on the correction front.

GNOME Shell 3.34.1 is heavy on the fixes. Prominent work there includes allowing the editing of app folder names, making menu animations more consistent, improving performance when enabling/disabling all extensions, fixing screen dimming on idle, crash fixes, and a variety of animation fixes. There is also the code for Wayland fullscreen compositing bypass and other fixes.

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David Edmundson Improving KDE Plasma and GNOME's Tobias Mueller Speaks in ARES 2019

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Improving Plasma’s Rendering (Part 1/2)

    Many parts of Plasma are powered by QtQuick, an easy to use API to render shapes/text/buttons etc.
    QtQuick contains a rendering engine powered by OpenGL making full use of the graphics card keeping our drawing super fast, super lightweight and in general amazing…when things work.

  • Tobias Mueller: Talking at ARES 2019 in Canterbury, UK

    The opening keynote was given by Alistair MacWilson from Bletchley Park. Yeah, the same Bletchley Park which Alan Turing worked at. He talked about the importance of academia in closing the cybersecurity talent gap. He said that the deficit of people knowing anything about cybersecurity skills is 3.3M with 380k alone in Europe, but APAC being desperately short of 2.1M professionals. All that is good news for us youngsters in the business, but not so good, he said, if you rely on the security of your IT infrastructure… It’s not getting any better, he said, considering that the number of connected devices and the complexity of our infrastructure is rising. You might think, he said, that highly technical skills are required to perform cybersecurity tasks. But he mentioned that 88% of the security problems that the global 5000 companies have stem from human factors. Inadequate and unfocussed training paired with insufficient resources contribute to that problem, he said. So if you don’t get continuous training then you will fall behind with your skill-set.

    There were many remarkable talks and the papers can be found online; albeit behind a paywall. But I expect SciHub to have copies and authors to be willing to share their work if you ask. Anyway, one talk I remember was about delivering Value Added Services to electric vehicle charging. They said that it is currently not very attractive for commercial operators to provide charging stations, because the margin is low. Hence, additional monetisation in form of Value Added Services (VAS) could be added. They were thinking of updating the software of the vehicle while it is charging. I am not convinced that updating the car’s firmware makes a good VAS but I’m not an economist and what do I know about the world of electric vehicles. Anyway, their proposal to add VAS to the communication protocol might be justified, but their scenario of delivering software updates over that channel seems like a lost opportunity to me. Software updates are currently the most successful approach to protecting users, so it seems warranted to have an update protocol rather than a VAS protocol for electric vehicles.

GNOME 3.34.1 released

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.34.1 is now available. This is a stable release containing four weeks' worth of bugfixes since the 3.34.0 release. Since it only contains bugfixes, all distributions shipping 3.34.0 should upgrade.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.34.1, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot...

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Also: GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

Dash to Dock v67 Released, Adds Unity-style ‘Trash’ Icon

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GNOME

Dash to Dock v67 adds support for the recently released GNOME 3.34. This change wasn’t trivial and is said to have necessitated “significant modernization of the code base”.

As a side effect, Dash to Dock developer Michele G says support for previous GNOME Shell versions has been dropped with this version.

Don’t panic unnecessarily though as older versions of Dash to Dock are still available to install from extensions.gnome.org (EGO) for previous GNOME Shell releases.

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ArcMenu 33 Lands with HUGE Improvements, GNOME 3.34 Support

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GNOME

So when a bunch of you mailed in to to tell me there was new release (appreciated, btw!) I just had to check it out and give it a bit of a write-up here.

And what a release it is!

ArcMenu 33 (labelled as v34 on EGO) is a pretty substantial update packed full of welcome improvements — so much so that the app menu’s developers bill this update as a milestone release.

So what’s new?

Arc Menu now lets you select from a number of different menu layouts, including those more akin to Windows as well as those more akin to launchers found on DEs, such as Unity dash, Linux Mint’s Cinnamon menu, and the Solus OS Brisk Menu.

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KDE and GNOME/GTK Development

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Recently Used ioslave

    With D7446 landing, the new ioslave recentlyused:/ ioslave will become user visible with KDE Frameworks 5.63. This differential revision adds two entries "Recent Files" and "Recent Locations" to the place panel (in dolphin and open/save dialogs)

    It leverages the ioslave recentlyused:/ introduced in D22144, allowing to access KActivity data. KActivity is the service that provides "recent" elements to kickoff menu and is activity aware as the name suggests.

    [...]

    When working on this new feature, It was a great time to improve KActivity. So I allowed KActivity to ingest data from gtk applications in differential D23112.

    I want to thank Ivan Lukić for building KActivity service and library and reviewing most of this work. And I want to thank all the other reviewers involved.

  • Incremental present in GTK4

    When working with graphical applications, there are multiple constraints and techniques applied in order to reduce the number of pixels that are being uploaded to the GPU, swapped on screen, or being manipulated. Even with highly optimized GPUs, the massive number of pixels we have to deal with (a 1080p monitor, for example, has 2 million pixels!) forces everyone to have some level of scrutiny.

    When it comes to Linux compositors and clients, a widely adopted technique is regional rendering. GTK tracks which parts of the window actually changed and only redraws that part; then sends this information to the compositor so that the compositor itself can redraw only the new contents of the window.

    Fortunately, the entire graphics stack is well optimized for doing that! When using EGL, we can use eglSwapBuffersWithDamageEXT(), which receives a list of rectangles representing the parts of the window that changed. Mutter also uses a similar API after compositing the desktop.

  • GTK4 Now Allows More Efficient Usage With Its Vulkan Renderer

    This week the GTK 4.0 development code picked up support for making use of the VK_KHR_incremental_present extension with its Vulkan renderer in order to allow much more efficient behavior.

    VK_KHR_incremental_present is akin to EGL's eglSwapBuffersWithDamageEXT behavior in being able to specify changed regions of the display for updating, rather than resorting to updating the entire screen. Up to now, each time the entire contents of the GTK4 windows when rendered via their new Vulkan renderer would be updated.

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More in Tux Machines

Google: Replacing Google Chrome, AMP and Titan Security Keys

  • The top 5 alternatives to Google Chrome

    Google Chrome is the most popular web browser on the market. It provides a user-friendly, easy-to-use interface, with a simple appearance featuring a combined address and search bar with a small space for extensions. Chrome also offers excellent interconnectivity on different devices and easy syncing that means that once a user installs the browser on different devices, all their settings, bookmarks and search history come along with it. Virtually all a user does on Google chrome is backed up to Google Cloud. Chrome also offers easy connectivity to other Google products, such as Docs, Drive, and YouTube via an “Apps” menu on the bookmarks bar, located just below the address/search bar. Google Translate, one of the best translation applications currently available on the internet, is also included.

  • Google unplugs AMP, hooks it into OpenJS Foundation after critics turn up the volume [Ed: Microsoft Tim on Google passing a bunch of EEE to a foundation headed by a Microsoft ‘mole’, 'open'JS ]

    AMP – which originally stood for Accelerated Mobile Pages though not any more – was launched in 2015, ostensibly to speed up page loading on smartphones. The technology includes AMP HTML, which is a set of performance-optimized web components, and the AMP Cache, which serves validated AMP pages. Most AMP pages are served by Google’s AMP Cache.

  • Google USB-C Titan Security Keys Begin Shipping Tomorrow

    Google announced their new USB-C Titan Security Key will begin shipping tomorrow for offering two-factor authentication support with not only Android devices but all the major operating systems as well. The USB-C Titan Security Key is being manufactured by well known 2FA key provider Yubico. This new security key is using the same chip and firmware currently used by Google's existing USB-A/NFC and Bluetooth/NFC/USB Titan Security Key models.

Manjaro | Review from an openSUSE User

There are many flavors of Linux, we call them distributions but in a way, I think “flavor” is a good word for it as some some are a sweet and delightful experience while with others a lingering, foul taste remains. Manjaro has not left a foul taste in any way. In full disclosure, I am not a fan of Arch based Linux distributions. I appreciate the idea of this one-step-removed Gentoo and for those that really like to get into the nitty-gritty bits Arch is good for that. My problem with Arch is the lack of quality assurance. The official repository on Arch Wiki describes the process of how core packages need to be signed off by developers before they are allowed to move from staging into the official repositories. With the rate at which packages come in, it is almost an impossibility that through manual testing software will continue to work well with other software as some dependencies may change. Admittedly, I don’t use it daily, outside of VMs for testing nor do I have a lot of software installed so this is not going to be a problem I am likely to experience. Manjaro, from my less than professional opinion, is a slightly slower rolling Arch that seems to do more testing and the process, from what I understand, is similar. Developers have to approve the packages before they are moved into the official repositories. I also understand that there isn’t any automated QA to perform any testing so this is all reliant on user or community testing, which, seemingly, Manjaro is doing a good job of it. My dance with Manjaro is as part of a BigDaddyLinuxLive Community challenge, to give it a fair shake and share your experience. This is my review of Manjaro with the Plasma Desktop. Bottom Line Up Front, this is quite possibly the safest and most stable route if you like the Arch model. In the time I ran it, I didn’t have any issues with it. The default Plasma Desktop is quite nice, and the default themes are also top notch. The graphical package manager works fantastically well and you do have Snap support right out of the gate. It’s truly a great experience. Was it good enough to push me from my precious openSUSE? No, but it has made for a contender and something about which to think. Read more

Android Leftovers

Open source interior design with Sweet Home 3D

Historically, I practiced the little-known fourth principle: don't have furniture. However, since I became a remote worker, I've found that a home office needs conveniences like a desk and a chair, a bookshelf for reference books and tech manuals, and so on. Therefore, I have been formulating a plan to populate my living and working space with actual furniture, made of actual wood rather than milk crates (or glue and sawdust, for that matter), with an emphasis on plan. The last thing I want is to bring home a great find from a garage sale to discover that it doesn't fit through the door or that it's oversized compared to another item of furniture. Read more