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Games: Humble and Five-or-More Modernisation in GNOME

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GNOME
Gaming
  • Humble Monthly will be changing to Humble Choice later this year

    If you're interested in getting a bunch of games each month, the Humble Monthly has at times been quite generous with the selection. Things are about to change, with it being renamed to Humble Choice with new options.

    Currently, you pay a set fee of $12 a month (or less for more months) and get at least one game to play early. Then at the end of each month, they give you a bunch more games ranging between 7-11. That's changing sometime later this year with Humble Choice. As the name suggests, it does seem to actually give you a little more control. Games are revealed upfront instead of being a mystery and you pick the ones you want from a larger list.

  • Imperator: Rome is getting a free Punic Wars content pack in addition to the big Livy update

    One piece of PDXCON news missed from yesterday: Imperator: Rome is getting a free Punic Wars Content Pack along with the upcoming Livy Update.

    Paradox Development Studio sure are busy. Not only are they working on multiple Stellaris expansions, Crusader Kings III and Hearts of Iron IV: La Résistance they're also trying to turn around the rough launch of Imperator: Rome. Another big free patch is coming out named Livy which will include: a new character experience system, a rework of the family system, a procedurally generated mission system, a map with greater details including showing war on the map with burning cities and more not yet announced. It's going to be big!

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: It's a Wrap

    As probably most of you already know, or recently found out, at the beginning of this week the GSoC coding period officially ended, and it is time for us, GSoC students, to submit our final evaluations and the results we achieved thus far. This blog post, as you can probably tell from the title, will be a summary of all of the work I put into modernising Five or More throughout the summer months.

    My main task was rewriting Five or More in Vala since this simple and fun game did not find its way to the list of those included in the Games Modernisation Initiative. This fun, strategy game consists of aligning, as often as possible, five or more objects of the same shape and color, to make them disappear and score points.

    Besides the Vala rewrite, there were also some other tasks included, such as migrating to Meson and dropping autotools, as well as keeping the view and logic separated and updating the UI to make this game more relatable for the public and more fresh-looking. However, after thoroughly discussing the details with my mentor, Robert Roth (IRC: evfool), more emphasis was placed upon rewriting the code to Vala, since the GSoC program is specifically designed for software development. However, slight UI modifications were integrated as to match the visual layout guidelines.

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: Now You Can Properly Play It

    As Google Summer of Code is officially drawing to an end, all of my attention was focused towards making the Five or More Vala version feature-complete. As you probably already know from my previous blog post, the game was somehow playable at that time, but it was missing some of the key features included in the old version.

    So what’s new this time? First and foremost, you can surely notice the game board now sports a grid, which wasn’t there until now. On the same note, there are also animations used for clicking a piece on the board, for an improved gaming experience. For further accessibility, some header bar hints are available at different stages in the game: at the start of any new game, at the end of each game, as well as whenever there is no clear path between the initial position and the cell indicated by the user for the current move.

GNOME 3.35.1 RELEASED

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GNOME

GNOME 3.35.1 is now available. This is the first unstable release
leading to 3.36 stable series.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.35.1, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox,
it should build reliably for you regardless of the dependencies on
your host system...

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.35.1 Released As The First Step Towards GNOME 3.36

GNOME Shell Development Updates

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Shell + Mutter Begin Landing Graphene Integration

    Graphene is a lightweight library that has been in development by GNOME's Emmanuele Bassi. Graphene -- not to be confused with several other software projects sharing similar names -- is intended as a very lightweight library providing graphics types and their relative API while avoiding any windowing system bits and other functionality with this layer just focused on providing speedy vector operations. Graphene has fast paths for SSE2, ARM NEON, GCC Vector extensions, and other optimizations for optimally dealing with graphic data types like matrices, vectors and points.

    [...]

    With part 1, various geometry/point/rectangle/vector Clutter objects are replaced with Graphene code. Ultimately this should provide for better performance around various graphic data type operations while also cleaning up some of GNOME's low-level code in the process. This initial integration is now in place for the initial GNOME 3.35/3.36 series though expect more Graphene improvements to come now that the initial support and dependency are in place.

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 2

    Well, we are starting the 3rd and last day of this hackfest… I’ll write about yesterday, which probably means tomorrow I’ll blog about today Smile.

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 3

    As promised, some late notes on the 3rd and last day of the gnome-shell hackfest, so yesterday!

How GNOME uses Git

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GNOME

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance. In my time with GNOME, I’ve been asked for my GitLab a lot.

We use GitLab for basically everything. In a typical day, I get several issues and reference bug reports, and I occasionally need to modify a file. I don’t do this in the capacity of being a developer or a sysadmin. I’m involved with the Engagement and Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) teams. I write newsletters for Friends of GNOME and interview contributors to the project. I work on sponsorships for GNOME events. I don’t write code, and I use GitLab every day.

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10 Ways to Customize Your Linux Desktop With GNOME Tweaks Tool

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

There are several ways you can tweak Ubuntu to customize its looks and behavior. The easiest way I find is by using the GNOME Tweak tool. It is also known as GNOME Tweaks or simply Tweaks.

I have mentioned it numerous time in my tutorials in the past. Here, I list all the major tweaks you can perform with this tool.

I have used Ubuntu here but the steps should be applicable to any Linux distribution using GNOME desktop environment.

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Hubert Figuiere on Flatpak and Flathub, GLib 2.63.1 Coming Soon

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Getting a stack trace out of a Flatpak

    So, the flatpak application you use just crashed

    How do you report it? If you file a bug just saying it crashed, the developers will probably ask for some stack trace. On Fedora 30, for example, abrt (the crash reporting system) doesn't provide any useful information. Let's see if we can extract that information.

    We are gonna have to use the terminal to use some command line tools. Flatpak has a tool flatpak-coredumpctl to use the core dump in the flatpak sandbox. The core dump is an image of the program memory when it crashed that will contain a lot about the crash. But by default the tool will not be able to provide much useful info. There is some initial setup need to be able to have a better output.

    First you must make sure that you have the right Debug package for the right version of the Flatpak runtime. Well, actually, for the corresponding SDK.

  • Music, Flathub and Qt

    I quickly realised that trying these apps on my Dell XPS 13 was really an adventure, mostly because of HiDPI (the high DPI screen that the PS 13 has). Lot of the applications found on Fedora, by default, don't support high DPI and a thus quasi impossible to use out of the box. Some of it is fixable easily, some of it with a bit more effort and some, we need to try harder.

    Almost all the apps I have tried used Qt. With Qt5 the fix is easy, albeit not necessarily user friendly. Just set the QT_AUTO_SCREEN_SCALE_FACTOR environment variable to 1 as specified in Qt HiDPI support documentation. There is also an API to set the attribute on the QCoreApplication object. There must be a good reason why this opt-in and not opt-out.

    [...]

    In the end, I have Hydrogen available on Flathub, the three others in queue for Flathub, and all have had patches submitted (with Muse3 and Rosegarden already merged upstream).

  • g_warning_once() in GLib 2.63.1

    GLib 2.63.1 will be released in the next few weeks, and will contain a fun new API to slightly simplify emitting a warning once, and then shutting up to avoid emitting loads of log spam.

Cast To TV v11 GNOME Chromecast Extension Adds Remote Widget Playlist, GNOME Shell 3.34 Support

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GNOME

Cast to TV, a GNOME Shell extension to cast media (with optional transcoding) to Chromecast and other devices over the local network, was updated to version 11 yesterday. This release brings support for the latest GNOME 3.34, a file queue (playlist) for the remote widget, NVENC hardware acceleration support, and more.

Cast to TV is a GNOME Shell extension to cast videos, music and pictures to Chromecast or other devices over a local network. It supports video transcoding on the fly (for videos that can't directly play on the device), customizable subtitles, it can show a music visualizer while casting music, and much more. For controlling the device, the Gnome Shell extensions adds a new button on the top panel with playback controls.

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GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.34.1 Deliver On Their Prominent Fixes

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GNOME

There weren't out in time for yesterday's formal GNOME 3.34.1 point release, but GNOME Shell and Mutter have out their prominent point releases today that are exciting on the correction front.

GNOME Shell 3.34.1 is heavy on the fixes. Prominent work there includes allowing the editing of app folder names, making menu animations more consistent, improving performance when enabling/disabling all extensions, fixing screen dimming on idle, crash fixes, and a variety of animation fixes. There is also the code for Wayland fullscreen compositing bypass and other fixes.

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David Edmundson Improving KDE Plasma and GNOME's Tobias Mueller Speaks in ARES 2019

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Improving Plasma’s Rendering (Part 1/2)

    Many parts of Plasma are powered by QtQuick, an easy to use API to render shapes/text/buttons etc.
    QtQuick contains a rendering engine powered by OpenGL making full use of the graphics card keeping our drawing super fast, super lightweight and in general amazing…when things work.

  • Tobias Mueller: Talking at ARES 2019 in Canterbury, UK

    The opening keynote was given by Alistair MacWilson from Bletchley Park. Yeah, the same Bletchley Park which Alan Turing worked at. He talked about the importance of academia in closing the cybersecurity talent gap. He said that the deficit of people knowing anything about cybersecurity skills is 3.3M with 380k alone in Europe, but APAC being desperately short of 2.1M professionals. All that is good news for us youngsters in the business, but not so good, he said, if you rely on the security of your IT infrastructure… It’s not getting any better, he said, considering that the number of connected devices and the complexity of our infrastructure is rising. You might think, he said, that highly technical skills are required to perform cybersecurity tasks. But he mentioned that 88% of the security problems that the global 5000 companies have stem from human factors. Inadequate and unfocussed training paired with insufficient resources contribute to that problem, he said. So if you don’t get continuous training then you will fall behind with your skill-set.

    There were many remarkable talks and the papers can be found online; albeit behind a paywall. But I expect SciHub to have copies and authors to be willing to share their work if you ask. Anyway, one talk I remember was about delivering Value Added Services to electric vehicle charging. They said that it is currently not very attractive for commercial operators to provide charging stations, because the margin is low. Hence, additional monetisation in form of Value Added Services (VAS) could be added. They were thinking of updating the software of the vehicle while it is charging. I am not convinced that updating the car’s firmware makes a good VAS but I’m not an economist and what do I know about the world of electric vehicles. Anyway, their proposal to add VAS to the communication protocol might be justified, but their scenario of delivering software updates over that channel seems like a lost opportunity to me. Software updates are currently the most successful approach to protecting users, so it seems warranted to have an update protocol rather than a VAS protocol for electric vehicles.

GNOME 3.34.1 released

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.34.1 is now available. This is a stable release containing four weeks' worth of bugfixes since the 3.34.0 release. Since it only contains bugfixes, all distributions shipping 3.34.0 should upgrade.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.34.1, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot...

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

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