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GNOME

Snapcraft GNOME Extension Update

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GNOME

Snaps are confined software packages for Linux. They were originally designed / intended for IoT use cases so are optimised for size, bundling dependencies, are compressed on disk and auto update. They can also be used to package server software, like NextCloud, and desktop software like Signal Desktop. There’s millions of desktops, routers, servers and other interesting devices with snaps installed.

There’s a bunch of common components that snap publishers started bundling in their snaps which bloated them out a bit. Snaps have had (for some time) a concept of “shared content” such that one snap may consume assets from another snap. The reason we use the hand-wavy term “assets” and “content” is because while it could be binary programs and libraries which are shared between snaps, it’s not just limited to that. A theme or bundle of themes can be shared too.

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GNOME 40 Alpha Released

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GNOME

GNOME 40 is now available as the first step towards releasing this updated Linux desktop environment in March.

GNOME 40 Alpha comes with a ton of changes -- many of which we have been outlining in various Phoronix articles over the past few months. Among the main highlights of GNOME 40

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GNOME, Arch and FreeBSD

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Phaedrus Leeds: Cleaning Up Unused Flatpak Runtimes

    Despite having been a contributor to the GNOME project for almost 5 years now (first at Red Hat and now at Endless), I’ve never found the time to blog about my work. Fortunately in many cases collaborators have made posts or the work was otherwise announced. Now that Endless is a non-profit foundation and we are working hard at advocating for our solutions to technology access barriers in upstream projects, I think it’s an especially good time to make my first blog post announcing a recent feature in Flatpak, which I worked on with a lot of help from Alex Larsson.

    On many low-end computers, persistent storage space is quite limited. Some Endless hardware for example has only 32 GB. And we want to fill much of it with useful content in the form of Flatpak apps so that the computers are useful even offline. So often in the past we have shipped computers that are already quite full before the user stores any files. Ideally we want that limited space to be used as efficiently as possible, and Flatpak and OSTree already have some neat mechanisms to that end, such as de-duplicating any identical files across all apps and their runtimes (and, in the case of Endless OS, including the OS files as well).

  • Outreachy Progress Report

    I’m halfway gone into my Outreachy internship at the GNOME Foundation. Time flies so fast right? I’m a little emotional cuz I don’t want this fun adventure to end soo soon. Just roughly five weeks to go!!
    Oh well, let’s find out what I’ve been able to achieve over the past eight weeks and what my next steps are…

    My internship project is to complete the integration between the GNOME Translation Editor (previously known as Gtranslator) and Damned Lies(DL). This integration involves enabling users to reserve a file for translation directly from the Translation Editor and permitting them to upload po files to DL.

  • Kubernetes on Hetzner in 2021

    Hello and welcome to my little Kubernetes on Hetzner tutorial for the first half of 2021. This tutorial will help you bootstrapping a Kubernetes Cluster on Hetzner with KubeOne. I am writing this small tutorial, because I had some trouble to bootstrap a cluster on Hetzner with KubeOne. But first of all let us dive into the question why we even need KubeOne and how does KubeOne helps. KubeOne is a small wrapper around kubeadm. Kubeadm is the official tool for installing Kubernetes on VMs or bare-metal nodes, but it has one major disadvantage: It is very toilsome. KubeOne tries to solve this with providing you a wrapper around Kubeadm and various other provisioning tools like Terraform. Terraform lets you manage your infrastructure as code. The advantage is that you can easily destroy, deploy or enhance your infrastructure via a few config file changes. You may ask yourself why you even need this tutorial. There is already at least one tutorial that guides you through the process of setting up a Kubernetes cluster on Hetzner. This is correct, but I felt it is unnecessary complicated, takes too much manual steps and is not really automatable (although there are solutions like kubespray that intend to solve this).

  • FreeBSD Desktop – Part 22 – Configuration – Aero Snap Extended

    I like to post new articles and solutions when I think they are ready. Production tested and stable. Well thought and tested … or at least trying to make things as good as possible in the available time window. Perfectionism definitely does not help making often articles on the blog.

    Today’s solution is not perfect but I will ‘ship it’ anyway because good and done is better then perfect. I wanted to rework it so many times that I stopped counting … and I really would like to continue the series – thus I have made a conscious decision to finally release it and hope that maybe someone else will have better ideas to make it better. I really wanted to provide pixel perfect solution with as much screen space used as possible but to deliver it as it is I tested it only on the resolution I use the most – the FullHD one with 1920×1080 pixels.

    You may want to check other articles in the FreeBSD Desktop series on the FreeBSD Desktop – Global Page where you will find links to all episodes of the series along with table of contents for each episode’s contents.

GParted 1.2.0 Released

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

  • GParted 1.2.0 Released
    GParted is the GNOME Partition Editor for creating, reorganizing, and
    deleting disk partitions.
    
    The GParted 1.2.0 release includes some new features in addition to bug
    fixes, and language translation updates.
    
    Key changes include:
         - Add exFAT support using exfatprogs
         - Wait for udev change on /dev/DISK when erasing signatures
         - Don't try to mask non-existent Systemd \xe2\x97\x8f.service
    
    Visit https://gparted.org for more details.
    
  • GParted 1.2 Released With Support For exFAT File-Systems

    GParted as the widely used, GUI solution for managing Linux partitions/file-systems on the Linux desktop now finally supports dealing with exFAT file-systems.

    Since Linux 5.7 has been the modern exFAT file-system driver from Samsung to replace the earlier exFAT driver code following Microsoft's blessing in late 2019. That exFAT file-system driver is in increasingly good shape and continues seeing fixes/improvements with succeeding kernel releases and continues to be widely used on Android devices and elsewhere.

  • GParted 1.2 Open-Source Partition Editor Released with exFAT Support

    GParted 1.2 open-source partition editor software has been released today with initial support for the exFAT file system, as well as various other improvements.

    Coming a year after the previous release, GParted 1.2 is here as the first release of the popular and very handy partition editor utility to implement support for partitioning disks formatted with the exFAT file system developed by Microsoft. exFAT support is handled by using the exfatprogs command-line utility, which needs to be installed in your GNU/Linux system.

GNOME 40 Alpha Released for Public Testing with New Activities Overview Design

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GNOME

After about four months since it entered development, the upcoming GNOME 40 desktop environment series, due for release at the end of March 2021, now has an initial development release that anyone can test it to get an early taste of the new features and improvements.

The biggest new feature in GNOME 40 looks to be a reimagined Activities Overview that promises better overview spatial organization, improved touchpad navigation, more engaging app browsing and launching, as well as better boot performance.

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The 10 Best GNOME Based Linux Distributions To Check Out in 2021

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Linux
GNOME

If you have ever used Linux, then there is no chance that you didn’t hear about GNOME. GNOME is one of the best user-friendly and open source desktop environments based on Linux. It started its journey in 1997 by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena. But it is still popular among Linux lovers for its features. As a result, a bunch of distributions uses GNOME as their default desktop environment. Among them, Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch Linux are known as the best GNOME based Linux distribution. Moreover, this magnificent desktop environment comes with many features. For instance, a better web experience, GNOME map, application grid, and many more.

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GNOME: outreachy, flexbox and restrictions

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GNOME
  • Nasah Kuma: My Journey to GJS’ Backtrace “full” Option

    My outreachy internship has definitely taught me a lot of things including writing blog posts, reporting tasks, expressing myself and of course improving as a developer. When we developed a project timeline before submitting the final application weeks back, my mentor and I underestimated some of the issues because there were some hidden difficulties we only found out later.

    Initially, my timeline was set to using the first week to understand the inner workings of the debugger, using week 2-4 on the backtrace full command, using week 5-7 to display the current line of the source code when displaying the current frame in the debugger and the task for week 8-13 were still to be decided upon by my mentor and I within the course of the internship.

  • Sergio Villar Senin: Flexbox Cats (a.k.a fixing images in flexbox)

    In my previous post I discussed my most recent contributions to flexbox code in WebKit mainly targeted at reducing the number of interoperability issues among the most popular browsers. The ultimate goal was of course to make the life of web developers easier. It got quite some attention (I loved Alan Stearns’ description of the post) so I decided to write another one, this time focused in the changes I recently landed in WebKit (Safari’s engine) to improve the handling of elements with aspect ratio inside flexbox, a.k.a make images work inside flexbox. Some of them have been already released in the Safari 118 Tech Preview so it’s now possible to help test them and provide early feedback.

  • GNOME Software Jailbreak

    As many users have noticed, you cannot install all the software you want on your computer via gnome-software. This restriction has been imposed by the developers...

GTK/GNOME: Changes in GNOME Shell and GNOME 40, GErrors in GLib

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Files 40.alpha: Creation timestamp & Wallpaper portal

    In my last post I’ve promised that the next one would have screenshots of new developments in the Files app, and it’s finally here!

    It took me longer than I expected back then. After the 3.38 release, I had to had to focus my time elsewhere: assisting and training local primary health care teams in managing and following up of the raising number of COVID-19 cases assigned to them. With this mission accomplished, in December I’ve picked up again on my GNOME contributions and have something to show you now.

  • GNOME Shell Merges Port Of Extensions App + Portal To GTK4 - Phoronix

    With GTK4 out and stabilizing well, more GNOME components are working to migrate to this updated toolkit as part of the GNOME 40 development cycle.

    The latest GTK4 porting work to be merged is GNOME Shell's extensions application and portal components being moved from GTK3 to GTK4.

  • GNOME 40 Will Finally Show File Creation Times Within Its File Manager - Phoronix

    Finally in 2021 with the GNOME 40 release is the ability of GNOME's Nautilus file manager to show and sort by file creation times...

    Going back more than a decade have been requests for being able to show timestamps for when files are created within the GNOME file manager or to be able to sort by file creation times in a folder rather than the last modified date. Initially that was blocked by the Linux kernel / file-systems exposing the information while in recent years that's been addressed and more time until it was implemented for GNOME.

  • Philip Withnall: Add extended information to GErrors in GLib 2.67.2

    Thanks to Krzesimir Nowak, a 17-year-old feature request in GLib has been implemented: it’s now possible to define GError domains which have extended information attached to their GErrors.

    You could now, for example, define a GError domain for text parser errors which includes context information about a parsing failure, such as the current line and character position. Or attach the filename of a file which was being read, to the GError informing of a read failure. Define an extended error domain using G_DEFINE_EXTENDED_ERROR(). The extended information is stored in a ‘private’ struct provided by you, similarly to how it’s implemented for GObjects with G_DEFINE_TYPE_WITH_PRIVATE().

Matthias Clasen: GTK 4.0.1

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GNOME

We all took a bit of a break after 4.0 and did some other things, but now it is time for GTK 4.0.1.

[...]

Does this mean GtkVideo is now ready to support fully-featured media player applications? Far from it. It still just lets you play media from a file or url, and does not support multi-channel audio, video overlays, device selection, input, and other things that you probably want in a media player.

It would be really nice if somebody took the code in the GTK media backend and turned it inside out to make a GStreamer plugin with a sink that exposes its video frames as GdkPaintable. That would let you use gstreamer API to get all of the aforementioned features, while still integrating smoothly in GTK.

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GNOME 40 Finally Fixes My Biggest Gripe

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GNOME

I know you're thinking "Joey, you've been here before", but this time it's different. Code has been committed and merged. A fix is finally happening.

This post, GNOME 40 Finally Fixes My Biggest Gripe is from OMG! Ubuntu!. Do not reproduce elsewhere without permission.

[...]

Does trivially tiny tweak mean the days of dotty delineated app descriptors are behind us? Since this has been committed and merged, it’s quite possible!

Not that this is (soon to be was) a huge deal to start with.

As said last time I wrote about this: this is a superficial ‘issue’ It’s not something that really affects many people. Most folks can predict that “LibreOffice Im…” opens LibreOffice Impress; and if anyone is perplexed by the appearance of the GIMP after hitting the shortcut sub-headed “GNU Manipul…” I’m yet to hear about it.

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Also: Make Gnome Suitable for E-Ink Monitors via This Extension

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More in Tux Machines

Free Software Leftovers

  • Ingo Juergensmann: Migrating from Drupal to WordPress

    If you can read this on planet.debian.org then migrating my blog from Drupal to WordPress was successful and the feed has been successfully changed by the Debian Planet Maintainers (thanks!). I’ve been a long term Drupal user. I think I started to use Drupal since it was included in Debian. At some point Drupal was removed from Debian and I started to use Serendipity instead. Later Drupal was included in Debian again and I moved back to Drupal. I think this must have been around Drupal 4 or Drupal 5. No idea. I even became active in the Drupal community and went to one of the first Drupal barcamps in Germany, namely in Cologne. This was shortly before Dries Buytaert started a business off of Drupal and went to the USA. I met with many devs of Drupal in Cologne and enjoyed the community and started with others a local Drupal User Group in Rostock. [...] So, after all the years my Drupal journey will come to an end. It was a long time with you. Sometimes joyful, sometimes painful. I wish you all the best, Drupal!

  • The round-the-world trip to fix a bug

    Mrs. Vera Cavalcante (@veracape), from Brazil, a long-time contributor for the Portuguese documentation on LibreOffice, was reviewing the translation of the Calc Guide and double-checking the translated text, with respect to the current user interface and the Help pages. Vera noticed that the Help pages on conditional formatting were not correct any more, and reported in the Brazilian team Telegram group (Bugzilla is still very hard for non-native English speakers).…

  • Red Kubes Container Platform Flies Open Source Flag

    Red Kubes, a Dutch-based startup, open sourced a free community edition of its Otomi Container Platform in a bid to remedy the ongoing complexity surrounding Kubernetes configurations. The scalability, agility, and speed-to-market advantages that Kubernetes offers have been handsome enough to capture a growing share of the enterprise market, but this very strength can become an Achilles heel for container deployments. In this sense, it’s far too easy – and common – to create thousands or even tens of thousands of containers across applications. Not only does this create an operational money pit, but management becomes a herculean feat to any container newbie.

  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® ECharts™ as a Top-Level Project

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today Apache® ECharts™ as a Top-Level Project (TLP). Apache ECharts is an intuitive, interactive, and powerful charting and visualization library ideally suited for commercial-grade presentations. The project originated in 2013 at Baidu and entered the Apache Incubator in January 2018.

  • Shots fired in disputes over OSS-as-a-Service

    Cloud services are the great disruptor of both IT organizations and vendors, and wrapping open source software around a service is the latest flashpoint. The open source development model has proven to be an incredible incubator of innovative software by democratizing and distributing the conception, design, implementation and debugging of new titles, advantages that were thoroughly explored more than two decades ago in the book, The Cathedral and the Bazaar. Although open source has since been adopted, encouraged and sponsored by every major software company, its origins were decidedly non-commercial with utopian overtones of liberating code from the tyranny of proprietary shackles. The earliest open source projects, notably Gnu Emacs and other tools from the Gnu Project, embraced this idealistic ethos with a restrictive, comprehensive license, GPL, that applies to derivative work using the code.

  • AWS to Fork Elasticsearch as Elastic Moves Away from Open Source

    Elastic’s license change from open source ALv2 to SSPL appears to have moved Amazon Web Services to “launch new forks of both Elasticsearch and Kibana.” Elasticsearch’s move towards the more restrictive Server Side Public License has already begun to ruffle feathers among developers.

Programming Leftovers

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Tcl - LinuxLinks

    Tcl (Tool Command Language) is a dynamic programming/scripting language based on concepts of Lisp, C, and Unix shells. Here's our recommended free tutorials to learn Tcl.

  • ROC and Precision-Recall curves - How do they compare?

    Both curves offer two useful information: how to choose the positive class prediction threshold and what is the overall performance of the classification model. The former is determined by selecting the threshold which yield the best tradeoff, in adequation with the prediction task and operational needs. The latter is done by measuring the area under the curves which informs about how good the model is, because by measuring the area under the curves, one computes the overall probability that a sample from the negative class has a lower probability than a sample from the positive class. With scikit-learn, the values can be computed either by using the roc_auc attribute of the object returned by plot_roc_curve() or by calling roc_auc_score() directly for ROC curves and by using the average_precision attribute of the object returned by plot_precision_recall_curve() or by calling average_precision_score() directly for PR curves.

  • Write GIMP scripts to make image processing faster | Opensource.com

    Some time ago, I wanted to give a blackboard-style look to a typeset equation. I started playing around with the GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) and was satisfied with the result. The problem was that I had to perform several actions on the image, I wanted to use this style again, and I did not want to repeat the steps for all the images. Besides, I was sure that I would forget them in no time.

  • Bash wait Command | Linuxize

    wait is a command that waits for the given jobs to complete and returns the exit status of the waited for command. Since the wait command affects the current shell execution environment, it is implemented as a built-in command in most shells. In this article, we’ll explore the Bash built-in wait command.

  • Santiago Zarate: Cron do not send me empty emails
  • Rust & the case of the disappearing stack frames | Inside Rust Blog

    Now that the FFI-unwind Project Group has merged an RFC specifying the "C unwind" ABI and removing some instances of undefined behavior in the "C" ABI, we are ready to establish new goals for the group. Our most important task, of course, is to implement the newly-specified behavior. This work has been undertaken by Katelyn Martin and can be followed here.

Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Thomas Petazzoni (Bootlin) on Training

  • Qsync fixed on the Pi4 and FF compiled

    The Raspberry Pi4 does not have a hardware battery-backed clock, so relies on getting the date and time from an Internet time server. In EasyOS, Qsync is the utility that does that. At first bootup, QuickSetup has a checkbox to enable getting time from the Internet, which will launch Qsync. At first bootup on the Pi4, if you are going to connect to Internet via wifi, not ethernet, then there won't be an immediate Internet access. No problem, Qsync will run once the Internet connection is established. Qsync will run just once at bootup and after Internet connection. That's fine, but I couldn't understand why it would suddenly stop working. Then discovered that /etc/init.d/qsync was getting its executable-flag cleared.

  • Arduino Blog » This children’s console looks like something straight out of a superhero’s lair

    Kids have wonderful imaginations, and to help students at a primary school have a super time, creator “palladin” was asked to construct a console for them to use. The device features a variety of lights and sci-fi additions, including glowing “reactor” tubes that diffuse light using hair gel and a “memory bank” that emits flashing patterns for a 1950s supercomputer look.

  • Arduino Blog » This pen plotter draws detailed maps the size of walls

    Christopher Getschmann wanted a wall-sized map of the world. He soon realized, however, that it’s tough to actually buy such a map that’s both beautiful and detailed enough to satisfy his cartographic tastes. While many would simply move on to the next “thing,” Getschmann instead took things into his own hands, and built a pen plotter specifically to draw massive 2×3 meter map for his wall.

  • New training course: embedded Linux boot time optimization

    For many embedded products, the issue of how much time it takes from power-on to the application being fully usable by the end-user is an important challenge. Bootlin has been providing its expertise and experience in this area to its customers for many years through numerous boot time optimization projects, and we have shared this knowledge through a number of talks at several conferences over the past years. We are now happy to announce that we have a new training course Embedded Linux boot time optimization, open for public registration. This training course was already given to selected Bootlin customers and is now available for everyone.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

     
  • A brief introduction to Ansible roles for Linux system administration

    In this part one of two articles, learn to use rhel-system-roles with your Ansible deployment to better manage functionality such as network, firewall, SELinux, and more on your Red Hat Enterprise Linux servers.

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  • From Docker Compose to Kubernetes with Podman | Enable Sysadmin

    Use Podman 3.0 to convert Docker Compose YAML to a format Podman recognizes.

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  • Fedora Community Blog: Software Management (RPM, DNF) 2020 retrospective

    On behalf of the RPM and DNF teams, I would like to highlight changes that have appeared in our packages in 2020. Thanks everyone for your bug reports and patches!

  •   
  • Application and data resiliency for Kubernetes

    Using tools like Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage, organizations are developing and deploying more stateful applications and microservices at an accelerating pace. According to a recent Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) research study, 41% of companies currently use containers for production applications. Another 33% use containers for dev/test and pre-production only but plan to use containers for production applications in the next 12 months.

  • Red Hat Introduces Data Resilience for Enterprise Kubernetes Applications

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today introduced new data resilience capabilities for cloud-native workloads with the release of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6. This offering from Red Hat Data Services enables customers to extend their existing data protection solutions and infrastructure to enhance data resilience for cloud-native workloads across hybrid and multicloud environments.

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  • Why Red Hat killed CentOS—a CentOS board member speaks

    This morning, The Register's Tim Anderson published excerpts of an interview with the CentOS project's Brian Exelbierd. Exelbierd is a member of the CentOS board and its official liaison with Red Hat. Exelbierd spoke to Anderson to give an insider's perspective on Red Hat's effective termination of CentOS Linux in December, in which the open source giant announced CentOS Linux was to be deprecated immediately—with security upgrades to CentOS Linux 8 ending later in 2021 rather than the 2029 end of support date CentOS users expected.