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Kiwi TCMS 10.5

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Server

We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 10.5 which celebrates the very positive reception we had at WebSummit 2021!

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Kubernetes 1.23 rc testing with MicroK8s

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Server

Today, Kubernetes 1.23 release candidate was made available upstream for testing and experimentation. General availability is planned for December 7th, so now is the time to report back any issues or bugs. Developers, DevOps and open source software enthusiasts can try out the latest features using MicroK8s.

MicroK8s is a lightweight, CNCF-certified Kubernetes distribution with a streamlined UX. It can run from a local workstation to the cloud and is ideal to build edge clusters as it includes all Kubernetes services and useful addons in a single light package. MicroK8s tracks all upstream releases, and allows users to select between stable versions for production, beta, or release candidate versions for testing.

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Web Server Survey and Security

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Server
Security
Web
  • November 2021 Web Server Survey | Netcraft News

    In the November 2021 survey we received responses from 1,175,392,792 sites across 267,027,794 unique domains and 11,525,855 web-facing computers. This reflects a loss of 4.06 million sites, but a gain of 1.60 million domains and 137,000 computers.

    nginx gained the largest number of domains (+741,000) and web-facing computers (+81,300) this month and continues to lead in both metrics with market shares of 30.1% and 37.3%.

    Further down in the market, there was also a noticeable increase in the total number of web-facing computers running LiteSpeed, which went up by 11,200 to 101,000 (+12.5%), although this resulted in only a 1.44% increase in domains. These counts include sites that run on LiteSpeed Web Server and its open source variant, OpenLiteSpeed, both of which exhibit the same “LiteSpeed” server banner.

    Both nginx and Apache lost nearly 4 million hostnames each, reducing their sites market shares to 34.7% and 24.4%. Meanwhile, Cloudflare gained 1.15 million sites, which has taken its total up to 58.6 million (+2.00%) and increased its sites share to 4.99%.

    nginx and Apache also suffered losses amongst the top million websites, paving the way for Microsoft to increase its presence by 2,369 sites (+3.75%). Microsoft web server software is now used by 65,600 of the top million sites, but Apache is still the most commonly used web server in this sector, with 240,000 of the top million sites using it, and nginx is not far behind with 224,000.

  • Security updates for Tuesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (mbedtls), Red Hat (kernel and rpm), and Ubuntu (freerdp2).

  • Over a million WordPress sites breached | ZDNet

    WordPress is far more than just blogs. It powers over 42% of all websites. So whenever there's a WordPress security failure, it's a big deal. And now GoDaddy, which is the top global web hosting firm with tens of millions more sites than its competition, reports that data on 1.2 million of its WordPress customers has been exposed.

Amazon Linux 2022 Released

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Red Hat
Server
  • AWS commits to update its own Linux every other year • The Register

    Amazon Web Services has announced that it will release an updated version of its own Linux every two years, starting with Amazon Linux 2022, which it is previewing now.

    The cloud colossus launched its first Linux distro in 2010, and seven … years … later … delivered a successor.

    In the name of speeding things up a bit, Jeff Bezos's computer rental service has promised a new release every other year, each of which will be supported for five years and receive quarterly tweaks.

    AL2022 uses the Fedora project as its upstream, but AWS may add or replace specific packages from other non-Fedora upstreams. The preview of AL2022 is based on Fedora34, while the full release will move up to Fedora 35 (which was released on 2 November).

    The SELinux security module is enabled and enforced by default in AL2022, but EC2 instances running the OS won't automatically implement patches or security updates. Users can instead choose to automate installation of packages, or patches, or both.

  • Announcing preview of Amazon Linux 2022

    Today, we are announcing the public preview of Amazon Linux 2022 (AL2022), Amazon's new general purpose Linux for AWS that is designed to provide a secure, stable, and high-performance execution environment to develop and run your cloud applications. Starting with AL2022, a new Amazon Linux major version will be available every two years and each version will be supported for five years. Customers will also be able to take advantage of quarterly updates via minor releases and use the latest software for their applications. Finally, AL2022 provides the ability to lock to a specific version of the Amazon Linux package repository giving customers control over how and when they absorb updates.

    Customers use a variety of Linux based distributions on AWS, including Amazon Linux 1 (AL1) and Amazon Linux 2 (AL2). These have become the preferred Linux choice for AWS customers because of no license costs, tight integration with AWS-specific tools and capabilities, immediate access to new AWS innovations, and a single-vendor support experience. AL2022 combines the benefits of our current Amazon Linux products with a predictable, two year release cycle, so customers can plan for operating system upgrades as part of their product lifecycles. The two year major release cycle provides customers the opportunity to keep their software current while the five year support commitment for each major release gives customers the stability they need to manage long project lifecycles.

  • Amazon Linux 2022 Released - Based On Fedora With Changes - Phoronix

    Amazon Web Services has made Amazon Linux 2022 now publicly available in preview form as the newest version of their Linux distribution.

    Amazon Linux / Amazon Linux 2 had been based on a combination of RHEL and Fedora packages while in today's Amazon Linux 2022 release they note it's explicitly based on Fedora. Besides apparently being more Fedora oriented now than RHEL, with Amazon Linux 2022 they are transitioning to a formal two year release cadence between their releases while having quarterly point releases.

    AWS intends to provide major Amazon Linux updates every two years while each major release will see five years of support and quarterly minor release updates.

Use Fedora Server to send text messages and voice alerts

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Red Hat
Server

This article will demonstrate how to configure Fedora Server as an alert and notification server that can place calls using an Asterisk PBX and send SMS text messages using Twilio. The use of the SMS message feature is optional. By using the call_only endpoint of the caller_prometheus_webhook component, you can limit the alerts to voice calls only.

Please consider that interacting with the Asterisk PBX is not easy. But it isn’t too hard either. If this is your first time working with this kind of application, coming to understand the concepts may require some patience. Fortunately, Fedora Server can be configured with Ansible and the installation of the py-phone-caller containers will not be difficult.

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Servers and Proprietary Software Leftovers

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Server
Security
  • OpenHPC Announces Release of OpenHPC 2.4

    This is an update release for the OHPC 2.x branch targeting support for RHEL8 variants and OpenSUSE Leap 15. In addition to a number of component version updates, this release updates previous CentOS8-based recipes to leverage Rocky8.

  • Docker really did change the world | InfoWorld

    In 2013, Docker was the “it” company. Docker made headlines for the critical role it played in bringing containers to the mainstream, and in many ways displaced PaaS as the hotness of the time (Heroku anyone?). Now, the company is back in the press with the introduction of a new model for Docker Desktop that requires larger organizations to buy a paid subscription for the tools. There’s been a vocal reaction to this announcement, one that reminds me of the important role Docker played in popularizing a model we know, love, and now use on a mainstream basis: containers.

    [...]

    By 2009, the value of using virtualization was well understood and it was widely deployed. Most organizations had already garnered the benefits of virtualization or had a roadmap to get there. The marketing machine was tired of virtualization. People were hungry for the next innovation in IT and software development. It came in the form of Heroku. In fact, PaaS in general and Heroku specifically became wildly popular. So much so that it looked like PaaS was going to take over the world.

    At that time, Heroku was huge. You just go out to this portal and develop your apps and deliver them as a service? What’s not to like? Why wouldn’t you develop apps on Heroku?

    As it turned out, there were a couple of good reasons not to use Heroku and PaaS platforms of its ilk. For example, applications built on Heroku were not portable; they were available only within Heroku. Developers had to work remotely on the PaaS platform if they wanted to collaborate. Unlike Netflix, it turns out, developers love to develop locally. If a developer wanted to work on their local box, they were still left to manually build the environment themselves.

    In addition, although the Heroku model was extremely powerful if you used what was provided out of the box, it was complex behind the scenes. As soon as your team built something more complex than a simple web app, or they needed to customize the infrastructure for security or performance reasons, it became a difficult, very “real” engineering problem.

  • SD Times news digest: Databricks launched Partner Connect; OpenAI’s API now available with no waitlist; Logz.io unveils observability updates - SD Times

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit enabling innovation through open source, and The Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which builds sustainable ecosystems for cloud native software, have announced that the Kubernetes and Cloud Native Associate (KCNA) exam, originally announced last month, is now generally available for enrollment and scheduling.

    In addition, a new online training course, Kubernetes and Cloud Native Essentials, has been released to both prepare individuals for entry level cloud roles and to sit for the KCNA exam. KCNA is made up of a multiple-choice certification exam designed to test entry-level knowledge and skills in Kubernetes as well as the wider cloud native ecosystem.

    The KCNA exam is broken up into different sections, including Kubernetes fundamentals, container orchestration, cloud native architecture, cloud native observability, and cloud native application delivery.

  • NCSC on rise in ransomware attacks [Ed: A Windows problem]

    Over the past 12 months the UK official National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has responded to a rise in ransomware attacks, and a range of services have been provided to businesses over the year to help protect them from ransomware. That’s according to the NCSC’s annual report on its fifth year of working, to August 2021.

  • Open-source leaders seek to fill the gaps in software supply chain security [Ed: These are proprietary software issues]

    Security of the software supply chain has gained significant attention over the past year. Two major cybersecurity attacks — SolarWinds and Kaseya — proved sharp reminders to reexamine every component of software development and deployment, including what they are and where they came from.

    The first signs of major supply chain vulnerability actually showed up over four years ago when the malware wiper NotPetya was launched against Ukraine in 2017. NotPetya attackers, believed to be threat actors in the Russian military, allegedly injected malicious code into accounting software owned by a Ukrainian company. The result was an estimated $10 billion in damages that impacted organizations across Asia, Europe and the Americas.

Open-Source Apache CloudStack 4.16 Improves Cloud IaaS

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Server

The Apache CloudStack project’s second major milestone release of 2021 improves storage and Kubernetes integration for the cloud platform.

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Nathaniel McCallum: Announcing Wyrcan

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Server

Wyrcan is a bootloader that boots into a container. That’s all it does.

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PostgreSQL Releases: pgAdmin, Pgpool-II, StackGres

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Server
  • PostgreSQL: pgAdmin 4 v6.2 Released

    The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.2. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 22 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes.

    pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website.

  • PostgreSQL: Pgpool-II 4.2.6, 4.1.9, 4.0.16, 3.7.21 and 3.6.28 released.

    Pgpool-II is a tool to add useful features to PostgreSQL, including..

  • PostgreSQL: StackGres 1.0.0 released: Open Source Postgres-aaS with 120+ Extensions

    StackGres 1.0.0 is an Open Source Postgres-as-a-Service that runs on any Kubernetes environment. StackGres is the Postgres platform with more Postgres extensions available: 120 as of today. Many more to come in the future.

  • PostgreSQL: Nordic PGDay 2022 calls for papers and sponsors open

    Having been canceled the past two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Nordic PGDay is once again scheduled to be an in-person event for the Nordic PostgreSQL community. The format is like before: a one-day single-track event - packed with great content but in a room big enough to ensure desired social distancing.

    Our call for papers is now open, accepting proposals until the end of the year. We welcome speakers from all parts of the world, all talks will be given in English. Technical details, case studies, good ideas or bad ideas -- all are good ideas for topics. All speakers get free entrance, so it's also a good excuse to come visit Finland!

Kubernetes Hype and FUD

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Server
  • Kubernetes, Containerisation and tech history repeating itself

    Over the the past couple of decades of IT, most of the focus has been around taking disparate elements of an organisation’s infrastructure and bringing them together into something much simpler. But now, with greater focus on applications and containerisation, it can feel like we’re breaking them all up again.

    However, it’s important to focus on the common thread that connects each big technology and infrastructure trend. The key thing in all this is that these changes have improved cross-functionality, communication, and collaboration across a business. So even if it feels a little like the latest trend is undoing something that’s already been done, in reality we’re moving forward and improving on what was there before.

  • Cloud Foundry insists Kubernetes transition still alive despite VMware's retreat [Ed: By Microsoft Tim]

    VMware has stated that the Cloud Foundry-based Tanzu Application Service for Kubernetes did not meet its standards, but despite this Cloud Foundry Foundation said that its Kubernetes transition is alive and well.

    The terminology is confusing, especially as VMware calls all its developer platform stuff Tanzu, so bear with us. Tanzu Application Service (TAS) is the Cloud Foundry-based platform that does not use Kubernetes. TAS for Kubernetes is that platform adapted to run on Kubernetes. Tanzu Application Platform (TAP) is nothing to do with TAS, but is VMware's latest effort to simplify deploying applications to Kubernetes.

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Kernel and Graphics: Linux Stuff and GPUs

  • Facebook/Meta Tackling Transparent Page Placement For Tiered-Memory Linux Systems - Phoronix

    Back during the Linux 5.15 cycle Intel contributed an improvement for tiered memory systems where less used memory pages could be demoted to slower tiers of memory storage. But once demoted that kernel infrastructure didn't have a means of promoting those demoted pages back to the faster memory tiers should they become hot again, though now Facebook/Meta engineers have been working on such functionality.  Prior to the Linux 5.15 kernel, during the memory reclaim process when the system RAM was under memory pressure was to simply toss out cold pages. However, with Linux 5.15 came the ability to shift those cold pages to any slower memory tiers. In particular, modern and forthcoming servers with Optane DC persistent memory or CXL-enabled memory, etc. Therefore the pages are still accessible if needed but not occupying precious system DRAM if they aren't being used and to avoid just flushing them out or swapping to disk. 

  • Linux 5.17 To Boast Latency Optimization For AF_UNIX Sockets - Phoronix

    Net-next has been queuing a number of enticing performance optimizations ahead of the Linux 5.17 merge window kicking off around the start of the new year. Covered already was a big TCP optimization and a big improvement for csum_partial() that is used in the network code for checksum computation. The latest optimization is improving the AF_UNIX code path for those using AF_UNIX sockets for local inter-process communication.  A new patch series was queued up on Friday in net-next for improving the AF_UNIX code. That patch series by Kuniyuki Iwashima of Amazon Japan is ultimately about replacing AF_UNIX sockets' single big lock with per-hash locks. The series replaces the AF_UNIX big lock and also as part of the series has a speed-up to the autobind behavior. 

  • Nvidia Pascal GPU, DX12 and VKD3D: Slideshow time! - Boiling Steam

    So Horizon Zero Dawn had a sale recently on Fanatical, and I thought… OK I’ll grab it! It’s time. I first installed it on my workstation that only has a GTX1060 3GB GPU – not a workhorse but a decent card nonetheless for low-to-medium end gaming. I knew very well that Horizon Zero Dawn is a DX12 game and that Pascal architecture (Nvidia 10xx basically) and earlier versions do not play very well with DX12 games running through vkd3d-proton, the DX12 to Vulkan translation layer. Still, I could imagine getting somewhere around 30 FPS on low-to-medium settings, and use FSR if necessary to get to better framerates. Nothing prepared me for the performance I was about to experience.

Linux 5.16-rc3

So rc3 is usually a bit larger than rc2 just because people had some
time to start finding things.

So too this time, although it's not like this is a particularly big
rc3. Possibly partly due to the past week having been Thanksgiving
week here in the US. But the size is well within the normal range, so
if that's a factor, it's not been a big one.

The diff for rc3 is mostly drivers, although part of that is just
because of the removal of a left-over MIPS Netlogic driver which makes
the stats look a bit wonky, and is over a third of the whole diff just
in itself.

If you ignore that part, the statistics look a bit more normal, but
drivers still dominate (network drivers, sound and gpu are the big
ones, but there is noise all over). Other than that there's once again
a fair amount of selftest (mostly networking), along with core
networking, some arch updates - the bulk of it from a single arm64
uaccess patch, although that's mostly because it's all pretty small -
and random other changes.

Full shortlog below.

Please test,

             Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.16-rc3 Released With Alder Lake ITMT Fix, Other Driver Fixes - Phoronix

Audiocasts/Shows: Endless OS 4.0.0, GIMP, BSD, KDE, and Elementary

today's howtos

  1. How to install FreeOffice 2021 on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux

    One of the best free alternatives to Microsoft Office is FreeOffice, developed by a German software company- SoftMaker. Recently, they have upgraded their Office suite to version 21. And here we learn the steps to install FreeOffice 2021 version on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux using the command terminal. This free office suite is a part of the commercial one from the same developers known as SoftMaker Office 21 (also available for Linux), of course, the premium will have more features but that doesn’t mean the free version- FreeOffice 2021 deprives to full fill all daily office documents (MS-Word alternative) related requirements. It offers a Microsoft office ribbon-like interface and three modules- TextMaker 21 to create documents; PlanMaker 21 to create sheets (Excel alternative) and Presentations 21 for making slides like MS-Powerpoint.

  2. Pin Custom Folders to Left Panel ‘Files’ Icon Context Menu in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    In Windows 10, user may right-click on the ‘File Explorer’ icon on panel to access pinned folders (e.g., Desktop, Downloads and Documents) quickly. Ubuntu has first implemented this feature in Ubuntu 21.10, though it seems to be not working properly due to bug. Ubuntu 20.04 may manually add the context (right-click) menu options so user can right-click on the ‘Files’ icon to choose open favorite folders quickly.

  3. How To Install Perl on AlmaLinux 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Perl on AlmaLinux 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Perl (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language) is a general-purpose programming language originally developed for text manipulation and now used for a wide range of tasks including system administration, web development, network programming, GUI development, and more. The major features of Perl are easy to use, supports object-oriented and procedural programming languages, and has built-in support for processing text. The most impressive feature of Perl is that it supports a large collection of third-party modules. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Perl programming language on AlmaLinux 8. You can follow the same instructions for Rocky Linux.

  4. How to play Total War: WARHAMMER on Linux

    Total War: Warhammer is a turn-based real-time tactics video game developed by Creative Assembly and published by Sega. It takes place in the War Hammer 40K universe. Here’s how you can play it on your Linux PC.

  5. How to install Funkin' Vs. Camellia on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Funkin' Vs. Camellia on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.