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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA's Ray Tracing Approach in Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA talk up bringing DirectX Ray Tracing to Vulkan

    With Ray Tracing becoming ever more popular, NVIDIA have written up a technical post on bringing DirectX Ray Tracing to Vulkan to encourage more developers to do it.

    The blog post, titled "Bringing HLSL Ray Tracing to Vulkan" mentions that porting content requires both the API calls (so DirectX to Vulkan) and the Shaders (HLSL to SPIR-V). Something that's not so difficult now, with the SPIR-V backend to Microsoft's open source DirectXCompiler (DXC).

    Since last year, NVIDIA added ray tracing support to DXC's SPIR-V back-end too using their SPV_NV_ray_tracing extension and there's already titles shipping with it like Quake II RTX and Wolfenstein: Youngblood. While this is all NVIDIA-only for now, The Khronos Group is having discussions to get a cross-vendor version of the Vulkan ray tracing extension implemented and NVIDIA expect the work already done can be used with it which does sound good.

  • NVIDIA Demonstrates Porting Of DirectX Ray-Tracing To Vulkan

    NVIDIA has written a new technical blog post on bringing HLSL ray-tracing to Vulkan with the same capabilities of DirextX Ray-Tracing. This effort is made feasible by Microsoft's existing open-source DirectXCompiler (DXC) with SPIR-V back-end for consumption by Vulkan drivers. Last year NVIDIA contributed to the open-source DXC support for SPV_NV_ray_tracing. This in turn with the open-source tooling allows converting DXR HLSL shaders into SPIR-V modules for Vulkan.

Vulkan Survey and AMDVLK, AMD Targets GNU/Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • LunarG's Vulkan developer survey results out now - Vulkan also turns 4

    LunarG, the software company that Valve sponsors who work on building out the ecosystem for the Vulkan API recently conducted a Vulkan developer survey with the results out now.

    Before going over the results, just a reminder that Vulkan just recently turned four years old! The 1.0 specification went public on February 16, 2016. Since then, we've seen some pretty amazing things thanks to it. We've had Linux ports that perform really nicely, the mighty DXVK translation layer advanced dramatically, to the vkBasalt post-processing layer and so on—there's been a lot going on. However, as a graphics API do remember it's pretty young and has a long life ahead of it.

    As for the LunarG survey: there were 349 replies to it, and while not a huge amount it gives us an interesting insight into what some developers think and feel about how Vulkan is doing as a whole. Overall, it gives quite a positive picture on the health of Vulkan with over 60% feeling the overall quality of the Vulkan ecosystem as "Good" and almost 20% rating it as "Excellent".

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 Released With Vulkan 1.2 Support

    AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 is out as the first official AMD open-source Vulkan Linux driver code drop in one month.

    AMDVLK has been off its wagon this quarter with their previous weekly/bi-weekly code drops of AMDVLK but that just means the v2020.Q1.2 is quite a big one. First up, AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 now is supporting Vulkan 1.2 that debuted back in January and with Mesa's RADV Radeon Vulkan driver already having supported it for weeks.

  • Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q1.1 for Linux Released

    AMD's Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q1.1 Linux driver release was made available this week as their newest quarterly driver installment intended for use with Radeon Pro graphics hardware.

Benchmarking OpenMandriva's AMD Ryzen Optimized Linux Distribution On The Threadripper 3970X

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While Clear Linux is well known as being the performance-optimized Linux distribution out of Intel and catered towards performing the best on their hardware (though as we continue to show, Clear Linux does also perform incredibly well on AMD hardware too and generally faster than other distributions), when it comes to AMD-optimized distributions the primary example remains OpenMandriva. Since 2018 OpenMandriva has been providing an AMD Zen optimized build where their operating system and entire package archive is built with the "znver1" compiler optimizations. As it's been almost a year since last looking at OpenMandriva's Zen optimized build, here are some fresh benchmarks using the newly-released OpenMandriva 4.1.

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Graphics: RADV Vulkan Driver, Intel Codecs and Defects, NVIDIA Firmware

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Option For Zeroing Out Video Memory

    New to Mesa 20.1-devel is a new option for the Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver to enable zeroing out video memory allocations.

    This isn't a new concept with other graphics drivers offering similar functionality for zeroing out the vRAM either for security reasons or working around pesky game/app issues. For example, RadeonSI OpenGL zeros out the vRAM for Rocket League to workaround buggy behavior with that game. But zeroing out the video memory normally isn't done by default for all allocations due to performance reasons.

    With the new flag to zero vRAM allocations for the RADV Vulkan driver it was done by Valve's Samuel Pitoiset. In this case he mentions it's in part for "future work."

  • Intel Gen12/Xe Graphics To Support 12-Bit HEVC/VP9 Decode

    We are learning more about the media engine capabilities with the forthcoming Intel "Gen12" (Xe) Tiger Lake graphics.

    The documentation for Intel's open-source media-driver that exposes VA-API capabilities on the Linux desktop was recently updated. That updated Intel VA-API Media Driver points to Intel Gen12 dropping VP8 video capabilities but expanding when it comes to 12-bit codec support.

  • Intel Sends Out Latest Patches For Mitigating Graphics Flaw On Ivybridge/Haswell

    It has been one month and a few days since Intel first made public the need for graphics driver patching of Gen 7/7.5 graphics for older Ivybridge / Haswell hardware to fix a graphics hardware flaw. That vulnerability also affected the common Intel Gen9 graphics but there the mitigation was uneventful and quickly merged without causing any performance hit. But for Ivybridge/Haswell one month later the graphics driver mitigation for CVE-2019-14615 is still being addressed.

    This vulnerability is also known as iGPU Leak by the researchers that discovered it but for the Gen7/Gen7.5 protection the mitigation has been particularly problematic. With the initial Gen7/Gen7.5 patches posted in mid-January there was a huge hit to the graphics performance while Intel worked towards no performance loss.

  • NVIDIA Posts Firmware Needed For Open-Source GeForce 16 Series Acceleration

    As written about last week, in the works for the Linux 5.7 kernel this spring is open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" acceleration for the GeForce 16 series. That code is currently sitting in the Nouveau development tree until landing in DRM-Next for Linux 5.7, but NVIDIA has now posted the necessary firmware binaries needed for enabling the hardware acceleration on these Turing GPUs.

FreeBSD vs. Linux Scaling Up To 128 Threads With The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I looked at the Windows vs. Linux scaling performance on the Threadripper 3990X at varying core/thread counts followed by looking at the Windows 10 performance against eight Linux distributions for this $3990 USD processor running within the System76 Thelio Major workstation. Now the tables have turned for our first look at this 64-core / 128-thread processor running on the BSDs, FreeBSD 12.1 in particular. With this article is looking at the FreeBSD 12.1 performance and seeing how the performance scales compared to Ubuntu 20.04 Linux and the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 based CentOS Stream.

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Mesa 20.0 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 20.0.0
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 20.0.0 as available for download immediately. I'm very
    pleased that we could get all of the issues blocking the release nailed down
    quickly and make a release on time for once!
    
    This is a .0 release, and you may want to continue to to track 19.3.x until
    20.0.1 comes out in two weeks. 19.3.5 is planned to be the final 19.3 release
    and is planned for next Wednesday.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Alyssa Rosenzweig (3):
          pan/midgard: Fix missing prefixes
          pan/midgard: Don't crash with constants on unknown ops
          pan/midgard: Use fprintf instead of printf for constants
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nir: Unify inputs_read/outputs_written before serializing NIR
    
    Dylan Baker (6):
          .pick_status.json: Update to 2a98cf3b2ecea43cea148df7f77d2abadfd1c9db
          .pick_status.json: Update to 946eacbafb47c8b94d47e7c9d2a8b02fff5a22fa
          .pick_status.json: Update to bee5c9b0dc13dbae0ccf124124eaccebf7f2a435
          Docs: Add 20.0.0 release notes
          docs: Empty new_features.txt
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0 release
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          Revert "nir: Add a couple trivial abs optimizations"
    
    Francisco Jerez (6):
          intel/fs/cse: Make HALT instruction act as CSE barrier.
          intel/fs/gen7: Fix fs_inst::flags_written() for SHADER_OPCODE_FIND_LIVE_CHANNEL.
          intel/fs: Add virtual instruction to load mask of live channels into flag register.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround unwanted SEND execution due to broken NoMask control flow.
          intel/fs/gen12: Fixup/simplify SWSB annotations of SIMD32 scratch writes.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround data coherency issues due to broken NoMask control flow.
    
    Krzysztof Raszkowski (1):
          gallium/swr: simplify environmental variabled expansion code
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't wait for shader compilation to finish when destroying a context
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Implement getImage/putImage on pbuffer swrast.
    
    Peng Huang (1):
          radeonsi: make si_fence_server_signal flush pipe without work
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          radeonsi/ngg: add VGT_FLUSH when enabling fast launch
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          glsl: fix a memory leak with resource_set
          iris: fix aux buf map failure in 32bits app on Android
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          Revert "st/va: Convert interlaced NV12 to progressive"
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          glsl: fix gl_nir_set_uniform_initializers() for image arrays
    
    luc (1):
          zink: confused compilation macro usage for zink in target helpers.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Released With Big Improvements For Intel, AMD Radeon Vulkan/OpenGL

    The Mesa 20.0 release switches to the new Intel OpenGL driver default, Vulkan 1.2 support for both AMD Radeon and Intel drivers, the RadeonSI OpenGL driver now has GL 4.6 compliance as part of switching to NIR, the Valve-backed ACO code-path for RADV is in much better shape, and many other improvements. See our Mesa 20.0 feature overview to learn about this big update.

  • Mesa 20.0 Is Imminent With New Intel OpenGL Default, Intel + RADV Vulkan 1.2, OpenGL 4.6 For RadeonSI

    With the release of Mesa 20.0 being imminent, here is a look at all of the new features for this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D stack for open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers.
    Highlights of the soon-to-be-out Mesa 20.0 are outlined below. Mesa 20.0 will be out as soon as today / this week unless delays happen over lingering bugs.
    - This is the first Mesa release where for those with Broadwell (Gen8) Intel graphics or newer the Intel Gallium3D driver is the new default for OpenGL support. This Intel Gallium3D driver is faster and in better shape than the i965 classic driver. That older OpenGL driver will stick around for supporting Haswell graphics and prior generations.

  • RADV Driver Adds VK_EXT_line_rasterization In Preparing For Eventual Vulkan CAD Apps

    Added to the Vulkan API last summer was VK_EXT_line_rasterization for line rasterization like employed by CAD applications. The open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver is now supporting this extension.

Graphics: Nouveau, Wayland, Mesa and RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Gallium3D Finally Seeing Mesa Shader Disk Cache For Faster Game Load Times

    While the open-source Intel and Radeon OpenGL drivers within Mesa have long employed an on-disk shader cache to help with game load times by being able to load previously compiled shaders from disk, the Nouveau "NVC0" Gallium3D driver is on the heels of finally seeing similar support.

    Nouveau saw a TGSI shader cache a few years ago while now it's finally seeing support for caching the compiled shaders.

  • LavaLauncher 1.6 Released As A Simple Dock/Launcher For Wayland

    If you have been looking for a simple dock/launcher that natively supports Wayland, LavaLauncher 1.6 is available as one such solution.

    LavaLauncher is a simple Wayland-only launcher that allows placing the dynamically sized bar against any screen edge. Unlike most launchers, LavaLauncher doesn't rely upon .desktop files but allows specifying a path to an arbitrary image and the associated shell command to run, allowing for it to be quite extensible than just showing .desktop files for launch applications.

  • Lima Gallium3D Driver Picks Up Multi-Submit Optimization In Mesa 20.1

    Lima in Mesa 20.1-devel now can handle multi-submit support for greater efficiency in handling of multiple OpenGL frame-buffer objects (FBOs). This should allow for greater efficiency/performance in the likes of the X.Org Server or Wayland compositors and avoiding flush-reload costs when switching between FBOs. No hard numbers, however, were provided for the multi-submit benefits to expect.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Makes A Few More Improvements For GCN 1.0/1.1 Hardware

    Valve open-source driver developer Samuel Pitoiset has contributed some improvements to Mesa 20.1's Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver benefiting GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics cards.

    These original GCN graphics cards are compatible with the RADV driver but require first switching the kernel driver from the default Radeon DRM driver over to the AMDGPU driver, normally via the radeon.si_support=0 radeon.cik_support=0 amdgpu.si_support=1 amdgpu.cik_support=1 kernel flags. After doing so, RADV has tended to work well with these aging GCN graphics cards -- especially more recently with the RADV ACO back-end now working back to GCN 1.0 for offering better performance.

Windows 10 vs. Eight Linux Distributions On The Threadripper 3970X

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

When taking the geometric mean of all these benchmark results, the Windows 10 Professional performance was the same as Windows 10 Enterprise for this Threadripper 3970X testing, unlike the Enterprise advantage we've seen on the larger Threadripper 3990X. The slowest of the eight Linux distributions tested was the Ubuntu 20.04 development snapshot, but that still came out to be 9.5% faster than Windows 10. The fastest Linux distribution was Clear Linux on the Threadripper 3970X with a 19% over Windows in these cross-platform benchmarks. Following Clear Linux with a strong showing was the new rolling-release CentOS Stream.

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NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux Driver Fixes Vulkan Game Crashes, New Extensions

    Not scheduled to go live until Monday but up this weekend is the NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux beta driver that offers a few Vulkan updates.

    The NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux driver fixes a regression that caused some Vulkan games to crash due to swapchain issues. Affected games include at least F1 2017, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and DiRT 4. This beta driver also fixes a visual glitching issue when falling out of page-flipping such as alt-tabbing on Linux.

  • NVIDIA have a new Vulkan Beta driver out for Linux fixing some regressions

    NVIDIA continue being quick to advance their Vulkan drivers as today they released an update to their special Beta branch.

    440.58.01 is out which adds in support for two more Vulkan extensions with VK_KHR_shader_non_semantic_info and VK_EXT_tooling_info which sounds quite useful to help developers track down what might be causing an error.

    For games this release fixes up a Vulkan swapchain recreation crash with F1 2017, Rise of the Tomb Raider and DiRT 4. NVIDIA also solved an issue with visual glitching of Vulkan applications when "falling out of flipping" with an example being when you alt+tab, however they're still investigating an issue to do with this on the GNOME desktop.

Mesa Releases: 19.3.4 and 20.0 Release Candidate 3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.3.4
    Hi List,
    
    Mesa 19.3.4 is now available.
    
    There's lots of stuff here, but also a ton of release process data changes.
    We've got changes all over the tree, but aco and anv are leading the way in
    changes.
    
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (1):
          radv: Do not set SX DISABLE bits for RB+ with unused surfaces.
    
    Boris Brezillon (1):
          panfrost: Fix the damage box clamping logic
    
    Brian Ho (2):
          anv: Properly fetch partial results in vkGetQueryPoolResults
          anv: Handle unavailable queries in vkCmdCopyQueryPoolResults
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (2):
          i965: Do not set front_buffer_dirty if there is no front buffer
          st/mesa: Handle the rest renderbuffer formats from OSMesa
    
    Drew Davenport (1):
          radeonsi: Clear uninitialized variable
    
    Dylan Baker (17):
          docs: Add SHA 256 sums for 19.3.3
          .pick_status.json: Mark 58c929be0ddbbd9291d0dadbf11538170178e791 as backported
          .pick_status.json: Mark df34fa14bb872447fed9076e06ffc504d85e2d1c as backported
          .pick_status.json: Update to 997040e4b8353fe9b71a5e9fde2f933eae09c7a3
          .pick_status.json: Update to ca6a22305b275b49fbc88b8f4cba2fefb24c2a5d
          .pick_status.json: Mark 552028c013cc1d49a2b61ebe0fc3a3781a9ba826 as denominated
          .pick_status.json: Update to f09c466732e4a5b648d7503787777c926dd93c29
          bin/pick-ui: Add a new maintainer script for picking patches
          .pick_status.json: Update to b550b7ef3b8d12f533b67b1a03159a127a3ff34a
          .pick_status.json: Update to 9afdcd64f2c96f3fcc1a28912987f2e8066aa995
          .pick_status.json: Update to 7eaf21cb6f67adbe0e79b80b4feb8c816a98a720
          .pick_status.json: Mark ca6a22305b275b49fbc88b8f4cba2fefb24c2a5d as backported
          .pick_status.json: Update to d8bae10bfe0f487dcaec721743cd51441bcc12f5
          .pick_status.json: Update to 689817c9dfde9a0852f2b2489cb0fa93ffbcb215
          .pick_status.json: Update to 23037627359e739c42b194dec54875aefbb9d00b
          docs: Add release notes for 19.3.4
          VERSION: bump version for 19.3.4
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          Revert "gallium: Fix big-endian addressing of non-bitmask array formats."
    
    Florian Will (1):
          radv/winsys: set IB flags prior to submit in the sysmem path
    
    Georg Lehmann (3):
          Correctly wait in the fragment stage until all semaphores are signaled
          Vulkan Overlay: Don't try to change the image layout to present twice
          Vulkan overlay: use the corresponding image index for each swapchain
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          freedreno/ir3: put the conversion back for half const to the right place.
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          intel/fs: Don't count integer instructions as being possibly coissue
    
    Jan Vesely (1):
          clover: Use explicit conversion from llvm::StringRef to std::string
    
    Jason Ekstrand (6):
          anv: Insert holes for non-existant XFB varyings
          anv: Improve BTI change cache flushing
          anv,iris: Set 3DSTATE_SF::DerefBlockSize to per-poly on Gen12+
          genxml: Add a new 3DSTATE_SF field on gen12
          intel/fs: Write the address register with NoMask for MOV_INDIRECT
          anv/blorp: Use the correct size for vkCmdCopyBufferToImage
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          i965: Use brw_batch_references in tex_busy check
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          isl: drop CCS row pitch requirement for linear surfaces
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: fix the DCC MSAA bug workaround
    
    Marek Vasut (1):
          etnaviv: Destroy rsc->pending_ctx set in etna_resource_destroy()
    
    Michel Dänzer (6):
          winsys/amdgpu: Keep a list of amdgpu_screen_winsyses in amdgpu_winsys
          winsys/amdgpu: Keep track of retrieved KMS handles using hash tables
          winsys/amdgpu: Only re-export KMS handles for different DRM FDs
          util: Add os_same_file_description helper
          winsys/amdgpu: Re-use amdgpu_screen_winsys when possible
          winsys/amdgpu: Close KMS handles for other DRM file descriptions
    
    Neha Bhende (1):
          svga: fix size of format_conversion_table[]
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (2):
          radeonsi: disable display DCC
          radeonsi: stop using the VM_ALWAYS_VALID flag
    
    Rafael Antognolli (1):
          intel: Load the driver even if I915_PARAM_REVISION is not found.
    
    Rhys Perry (6):
          aco: fix operand to scc when selecting SGPR ufind_msb/ifind_msb
          aco: ensure predecessors' p_logical_end is in WQM when a p_phi is in WQM
          aco: run p_wqm instructions in WQM
          aco: don't consider loop header blocks branch blocks in add_coupling_code
          aco: don't always add logical edges from continue_break blocks to headers
          aco: fix target calculation when vgpr spilling introduces sgpr spilling
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: do not allow sparse resources with multi-planar formats
          nir: do not use De Morgan's Law rules for flt and fge
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          mapi: add GetInteger64vEXT with EXT_disjoint_timer_query
          mesa: allow bit queries for EXT_disjoint_timer_query
    
    Thomas Hellstrom (1):
          svga: Fix banded DMA upload
    
    Vasily Khoruzhick (1):
          lima: ppir: don't delete root ld_tex nodes without successors in current block
    
    Vinson Lee (1):
          swr: Fix GCC 4.9 checks.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.4
    
    
  • mesa 20.0.0-rc3
    Hi list,
    
    Mesa 20.0.0-rc3 is now available. This is a much smaller release than last time,
    things seem to be slowing down nicely, and the number of opened issues/MRs
    against the 20.0 release milestone is 2; I'm hopeful that means we can have the
    20.0 release next week, and begin the normal release process without a dozen
    RCs.
    
    There's a bit of everything in here, gallium, freedreno, vulkan overlays, anv,
    radeonsi, svga, intel common, aco, nir, swr, and panfrost, but no on thing
    dominates the changes, which I like a lot.
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Dylan Baker (4):
          .pick_status.json: Update to d8bae10bfe0f487dcaec721743cd51441bcc12f5
          .pick_status.json: Update to 689817c9dfde9a0852f2b2489cb0fa93ffbcb215
          .pick_status.json: Update to 23037627359e739c42b194dec54875aefbb9d00b
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0-rc3
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          Revert "gallium: Fix big-endian addressing of non-bitmask array formats."
    
    Georg Lehmann (3):
          Correctly wait in the fragment stage until all semaphores are signaled
          Vulkan Overlay: Don't try to change the image layout to present twice
          Vulkan overlay: use the corresponding image index for each swapchain
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          freedreno/ir3: put the conversion back for half const to the right place.
    
    James Xiong (1):
          gallium: let the pipe drivers decide the supported modifiers
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          anv: set MOCS on push constants
    
    Marek Olšák (2):
          radeonsi: don't report that multi-plane formats are supported
          radeonsi: fix the DCC MSAA bug workaround
    
    Neha Bhende (2):
          svga: fix size of format_conversion_table[]
          svga: Use pipe_shader_state_from_tgsi to set shader state
    
    Rafael Antognolli (1):
          intel: Load the driver even if I915_PARAM_REVISION is not found.
    
    Rhys Perry (1):
          aco: fix gfx10_wave64_bpermute
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (4):
          aco: do not use ds_{read,write}2 on GFX6
          aco: fix waiting for scalar stores before "writing back" data on GFX8-GFX9
          aco: fix creating v_madak if v_mad_f32 has two sgpr literals
          nir: do not use De Morgan's Law rules for flt and fge
    
    Tapani Pälli (1):
          intel/vec4: fix valgrind errors with vf_values array
    
    Thomas Hellstrom (1):
          svga: Fix banded DMA upload
    
    Timur Kristóf (1):
          aco/optimizer: Don't combine uniform bool s_and to s_andn2.
    
    Vinson Lee (2):
          swr: Fix GCC 4.9 checks.
          panfrost: Remove unused anonymous enum variables.
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0-rc3
    
    
  • Mesa 20.0-RC3 Released Along With Mesa 19.3.4 As The Latest Of The Stable Series

    On the stable front, Mesa 19.3.4 is out as the newest point release in this driver series from Q4'2019. Mesa 19.3.4 has various RADV and ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a few Vulkan overlay fixes even, several AMDGPU winsys fixes, RadeonSI is now disabling display DCC over issues, and there are also a number of Valve ACO back-end fixes too. Overall, Mesa 19.3.4 is a pretty hefty stable update particularly for Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan driver users.

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More in Tux Machines

Planet Changes and Cilium

  • Planet Arch Linux migration

    The software behind planet.archlinux.org was implemented in Python 2 and is no longer maintained upstream. This functionality has now been implemented in archlinux.org's archweb backend which is actively maintained but offers a slightly different experience.

  • Cilium drops 1.7 release, upping insight and manageability

    Network and API connectivity project Cilium has been released in version 1.7, providing users with a UI for observability platform Hubble and the option to apply cluster-wide network policies. Cilium is an open source project developed by US startup Isovalent to provide and secure network connectivity and load balancing for workloads such as application containers or processes. It is based on a virtual machine-like construct called Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) which can be found in the Linux kernel.

OSS and Development

  • Someone is selling the free, open source Playnite launcher on Steam for $100

    Playnite is a free open source PC application designed to be an all-in-one answer to the growing number of game launchers we've all got on our desktops. In other words, it combines libraries from the likes of Steam, Epic Games Store, Uplay and GOG Galaxy, and then lets you organise them however you see fit. Jody tried it last year and came away impressed. I should emphasise the "free" above: it is available straight from the source here and, according to the site, "no features are locked behind a paywall and the complete source code is available under the MIT license". The MIT license basically surrenders the software to any kind of use with no restrictions, including resales.

  • uGet is an open source download manager for Windows and Linux that also supports Torrents and Video downloads

    The GUI has four panes, a menu bar and a toolbar. The Status pane in the top left corner displays all downloads and the ones which are Active, Queuing, Finished, and Recycled (deleted). The total number of downloads for each category is displayed next to its name, and you can click on any of these to see the list of items contained. Switch to the Category pane to jump between the default and the ones you have created. You can use the Category menu to add new sorting options, set the default download folder for each category, maximum active downloads, and also the maximum upload and download speeds. The pane below the toolbar is the download list pane; anything that you select in the status pane is displayed here. It shows the name, the file size of the download that has been completed, the total size, the progression percentage, time left to complete the download, and the upload/download speeds of each file. The View menu can be used to customize the columns that are displayed in the list pane, and the other visual elements of the program. Highlighting an item in the download list brings up its summary on the bottom pane.

  • Open Source Music Tagger Picard 2.3 Released With Custom MP4 Tags Support

    Free and Open source MusicBrainz announced the point release of Picard 2.3 with major changes to the user interface, tag, and desktop integration support. MusicBrainz stores all the metadata of the music and Picard is the official tag editor that helps in identifying and organizing the digital audio recording.

  • For Square Crypto, the Way to Bitcoin Mass Adoption Is Open Source

    When Jack Dorsey founded Square in February 2009, Bitcoin was all of one month old. In fact, Satoshi Nakamoto and Dorsey were likely laying the groundwork for their respective creations concurrently in the year prior. Ten years later, the two would converge in what now seems like an inevitable collision. Square launched its Venmo-like payment service, Cash App, in 2013. The application features common stock investing, and i

  • Gold-nuggeting: Machine learning tool simplifies target discovery for pen testers

    Recognizing this analogy with the precious metals industry, researchers at Delve Labs have developed Batea, an open source tool that leverages machine learning to find valuable information in network device data.

  • ’Second Revolution’ In Electronic Bond Trading

    Sri Ambati, chief executive and founder at H2O.ai, told Markets Media that the firm’s open source platform can perform one billion regressions in less than five seconds.

  • Google ‘AutoFlip’ can resize video using AI

    The way we consume video has changed a lot over the course of the last decade. We now watch videos on our mobile devices from anywhere and because of this, video content comes in a wide variety of formats. Google recognizes this shift and so last week their AI team announced ‘AutoFlip’ an open-source framework for “intelligent video reframing.”

  • This open-source framework, ‘AutoFlip’, can do automated video cropping using AI

    Many times when we see a video on mobile devices is badly cropped, it is not much you can do about it. Understanding this problem, Google’s AI’s team has built an open-source solution on top of MediaPipe, Autoflip, which can reframe a video that fits any device or dimension (landscape, portrait, etc.). AutoFlip works in three phases. The first phase includes scene detection; the second is the video content analysis, and the third is reframing. For this tool, if a video and a target dimension are given, it analyzes the video content. Later it develops optimal tracking and cropping strategies, which finally enables it to create an output video at the same time limit in the desired aspect ratio.

  • Tech Events in Africa: Nerds Unite, Open Source Festival and #CodeZone

    It’s a new week and another opportunity to meet up with like-minded people, become better in your chosen field and seal those deals for your startup. And we at TechNext want to help with a list of tech events happening around you this week.

  • An unofficial version of Brave browser brings native ARM64 support

    Privacy-focused Brave browser launched late last year after almost four years of being in the works. The browser is based on the Chromium open-source project and joins the likes of Microsoft Edge that is built on that platform. However, while Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft’s offering currently support ARM64 PCs natively in the stable channels, Brave does not. That might change, as Windows Insider MVP Jeremy Sinclair was able to compile an unofficial build of the open-source Brave browser that natively supports ARM64 PCs. The recompiled build (version 1.6.33) uses Microsoft’s ARM64 Chromium libraries and can run natively on those PCs like the Surface Pro X. Samsung Galaxy Book S. Native support results in improved performance and efficiency since the browser will not have to run in emulation.

  • The Brave web browser is taking on Google Chrome: Is it safe?

    The creator of Brave, Brendan Eich, also created JavaScript and co-founded the Mozilla Project that led to the development of the Firefox browser. Brave is based on the open-source Chromium browser that’s also the basis for Google’s Chrome, Opera and most recently Microsoft’s Chromium Edge browser. Open-source means that anyone can take the source code and build whatever they’d like out of it, but it doesn’t mean that all the browsers are the same. In the case of Brave, they chose to focus on user privacy by blocking trackers, scripts and ads by default. The natural by-product of blocking all this activity that usually goes unnoticed by the average user is faster load times. Brave can also make use of the wide variety of extensions for Chromium-based browsers via the Chrome Web Store at chrome.google.com.

  • This new tool could improve economic analysis of sub-national climate policies in the US

    Empowered by the Paris Agreement and a lack of national leadership on climate policy in the United States, state and local governments are leading on their own climate initiatives. California, New York and Colorado have set ambitious greenhouse gas emission and renewable energy targets for 2030. Just last week, Massachusetts introduced sweeping climate legislation targeting net zero emissions by 2050. As these environmental and energy policies move ahead, experts need to invest in economic data and tools that allow them to conduct robust economic analysis, to better inform policymakers, stakeholders and the public on how to design robust alternative climate and energy policies.

  • 2020 Open Access Award Finalists Named

    The Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences is a humanitarian/bioethics award presented annually by Bioinformatics.org to an individual who has, in his or her practice, promoted free and open access to the materials and methods used in the life sciences.

  • Are we having fund yet, npm? CTO calls for patience after devs complain promised donations platform has stalled

    At the end of August, JavaScript package registry NPM Inc said it intended "to finalize and launch an Open Source funding platform by the end of 2019." But instead of a platform, what's available at the moment might be better referred to as a feature of the npm command-line interface (CLI). The announcement was received with some skepticism at the time and the project hasn't managed to defy that expectation: There was a minor milestone last November with the addition of the "fund" command to npm v6.13.0. But not much has changed since then.

  • RcppSimdJson 0.0.2: First Update!

    RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic simdjson library by Daniel Lemire which truly impressive. Via some very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in persing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. I highly recommend the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed. This release syncs the simdjson headers with upstream, and polishes the build a little by conditioning on actually having a C++17 compiler rather than just suggesting it. The NEWS entry follows.

  • Nvidia Blames ‘Misunderstanding’ for Activision Faux Pas

    When Nvidia Corp. abruptly dropped Activision Blizzard Inc. games from its new GeForce Now service earlier this week, it left customers wondering what happened. Nvidia said on Tuesday that Activision had asked to have its titles removed from GeForce, but didn’t explain why. It turns out that the video-game giant wanted a commercial agreement with Nvidia before they proceeded -- and the situation stemmed from a simple misunderstanding, Nvidia said on Thursday.

Web Standards

  • Inrupt, Tim Berners-Lee's Solid, and Me

    All of this is a long-winded way of saying that I have joined a company called Inrupt that is working to bring Tim Berners-Lee's distributed data ownership model that is Solid into the mainstream. (I think of Inrupt basically as the Red Hat of Solid.) I joined the Inrupt team last summer as its Chief of Security Architecture, and have been in stealth mode until now.

    The idea behind Solid is both simple and extraordinarily powerful. Your data lives in a pod that is controlled by you. Data generated by your things -- your computer, your phone, your IoT whatever -- is written to your pod. You authorize granular access to that pod to whoever you want for whatever reason you want. Your data is no longer in a bazillion places on the Internet, controlled by you-have-no-idea-who. It's yours. If you want your insurance company to have access to your fitness data, you grant it through your pod. If you want your friends to have access to your vacation photos, you grant it through your pod. If you want your thermostat to share data with your air conditioner, you give both of them access through your pod.

  • World wide web founder scales up efforts to reshape internet
  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee's Inrupt is Redesigning the way the web is to Work and Apple is working with them on their Data Transfer Project

    Inrupt, the start-up company founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee to redesign the way the web works, is expanding its operational team and launching pilot projects in its quest to develop a "massively scalable, production-quality technology platform."

  • Inconsistent user-experiences with native lazy-loading images

    The specification for web browser native support for lazy-loading images landed in the HTML Living Standard a week ago. This new feature lets web developers tell the browser to defer loading an image until it is scrolled into view, or it’s about to be scrolled into view. Images account for 49 % of the median webpage’s byte size, according to the HTTP Archive. Lazy image loading can help reduce these images’ impact on page load performance. It can also help lower data costs by clients that never scroll down to images far down on a page. Historically, lazy-loading was implemented by responding to changes in the scroll position and tracking the image element’s offset from the top of the page. This could degrade page-scrolling performance. Comparatively, the new native lazy loading for images is easier to implement and doesn’t degrade scrolling performance.

Security and Scare for Sale

  • Malware Attack Takes ISS World's Systems Offline

    Founded in 1901, the Copenhagen, Denmark-based company provides cleaning, support, property, catering, security, and facility management services for offices, factories, airports, hospitals, and other locations all around the world.

    At the moment, the company’s employees don’t have access to corporate systems, as they were taken offline following a malware attack earlier this week.

  • The rise and rise of ransomware [iophk: Windows TCO]
  • Security flaws belatedly fixed in open source SuiteCRM software

    According to Romano, a second-order PHP object injection vulnerability (CVE-2020-8800) in SuiteCRM could be “exploited to inject arbitrary PHP objects into the application scope, allowing an attacker to perform a variety of attacks, such as executing arbitrary PHP code”. SuiteCRM versions 7.11.11 and below are said to be vulnerable. [...] “We have put a notice on our open source community channels and advice via social media. We have a dedicated community that works around the clock to spot vulnerabilities and produce suitable fixes, which is one of the key benefits for a business when choosing to use open source software.”

  • With the rise of third-party code, zero-trust is key

    The surface area of website and web application attacks keeps growing. One reason for this is the prevalence of third-party code. When businesses build web apps, they use code from many sources, including both commercial and open-source projects, often created and maintained by both professional and amateur developers. Web application creators take advantage of third-party code because it allows them to build their websites and apps quickly. For example, companies are likely to add a third-party chat widget to their site, instead of building one from scratch. But third-party code can leave websites vulnerable. Consider the July 2018 Magecart attack on Ticketmaster. In this data breach, hackers were able to gain access to sensitive customer information on Ticketmaster's website by compromising a third-party script used to provide chatbot functionality. The challenge is that this third-party functionality runs directly on the customer's browser, and the browser is built to simply render the code sent down from a web server. It assumes that all code, whether first-party or third-party, is good.

  • New company BluBracket takes on software supply chain code security
  • BluBracket scores $6.5M seed to help secure code in distributed environments

    BluBracket, a new security startup from the folks who brought you Vera, came out of stealth today and announced a $6.5 million seed investment. Unusual Ventures led the round with participation by Point72 Ventures, SignalFire and Firebolt Ventures.