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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux 5.1 Encounters "Regression Special" For Intel & VirtIO DRM Drivers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

If you have been hit by a bug on Linux 5.1 where your X.Org Server would no longer start or separately where when using VirtIO DRM that XWayland and GNOME Shell would break, fixes have now landed in Linux 5.1 Git.

David Airlie sent in the DRM fixes on Wednesday as a "regression special" for the Intel i915 and VirtIO DRM drivers compared to the usual DRM fixes cadence.

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The first pre-release of Cage

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Almost exactly four months ago I announced Cage, my Wayland compositor for a kiosk-like environment. To the uninitiated: a kiosk is designed for running a single, maximized application and preventing the user from interacting with any other part of the system. You’ve probably seen many in your life in malls, stores or even the dentist (how satisfied are you with your service?). Kiosks can also be used for much cooler things, though, such as running home automation systems.

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Also: "Cage" Sees Initial Test Release For Kiosk-Like Wayland Compositor

Mesa Graphics: AMD and RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Lands FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync For Mesa 19.1

    While on the kernel-side there has been FreeSync support with the AMDGPU DRM driver since Linux 5.0 and for the OpenGL driver with RadeonSI there has been this functionality in Mesa 19.0 when paired with a supported kernel, the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver has missed out on this action until now. But landing just in time for the Mesa 19.1 feature freeze is now the FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync enablement for RADV.

  • A Decade Later, Mesa Wiring In Support For Qualcomm/AMD's ATC Texture Compression

    Adding to the list of Mesa 19.1 changes is now AMD_compressed_ATC_texture being plumbed into Mesa/Gallium3D primarily with a focus on the Freedreno driver.

    AMD_compressed_ATC_texture is the extension worked on a decade ago by AMD/Qualcomm for ATC compressed texture formats. ATC was AMD's proprietary compression algorithm with a focus on mobile devices for power and memory bandwidth savings. That was right around the time ATI/AMD Imageon IP was sold off to Qualcom to form the Adreno graphics processors for the company's SoCs.

NVIDIA Linux Drivers and Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 430.09 Linux Driver Brings GTX 1650 Support, Surprising VDPAU Improvements

    With today's GeForce GTX 1650 launch, NVIDIA has posted the 430.09 Linux driver as their first in this new driver series.

    The GeForce GTX 1650 is now supported by this new NVIDIA LInux driver along with its Max-Q Design and the GTX 1660 Ti Max-Q Design.

    The NVIDIA 430 Linux driver also adds HEVC YUV 4:4:4 decode support to VDPAU, various other VDPAU additions, raised the X.Org Server requirement to version 1.7, adds the GL_NV_vdpau_interop2 extension, and updates the NVIDIA installer to work better on the latest Linux distributions.

  • NVIDIA have two new drivers out with 430.09 and the Vulkan beta driver 418.52.05

    NVIDIA have just recently released two new drivers for Linux users, with the main series now being at 430.09 adding new GPU support and the Vulkan beta driver 418.52.05 giving ray-tracing to some older GPUs.

    Firstly, the Vulkan beta driver 418.52.05 was actually released last week, which adds support for the "VK_NV_ray_tracing" extension for certain older graphics cards including the TITAN Xp, TITAN X, 1080, 1070, 1060, TITAN V and 1660 (along with Ti models). It also adds support for the "VK_NV_coverage_reduction_mode" extension, which doesn't seem to have any documentation up just yet. They also cited "minor performance improvements" and two bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA Releases The GeForce GTX 1650 At $149 USD, Linux Benchmarks Incoming

    The TU117-based GeForce GTX 1650 starts out at $149 USD and aims to deliver double the performance over the GTX 950 Maxwell and doing so in only a 75 Watt TDP, meaning no external PCI Express power connector is required. There are 896 CUDA cores and 4GB of GDDR5 video memory with the GTX 1650.

A Look At The Intel Cascade Lake Performance For Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux vs. FreeBSD Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the Xeon Scalable 2nd Gen launch at the start of April we've been running many different benchmarks including the performance on different Linux distributions and tests on FreeBSD 12.0. Now for seeing how Windows Server fits into the mix, here are Windows Server 2019 Build 17763 as well as Ubuntu 18.04 running on WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) from that same Windows Server build.

The same server was used for all testing that included two Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 processors, GIGABYTE MD61-SC2-00 Storage Server. 12 x 32GB DDR4-2933 memory, and a Samsung 970 PRO 512GB NVMe SSD for storage. Besides Windows Server 2019 and Windows Server 2019 WSL, this comparison includes CentOS 7, Clear Linux 28660, openSUSE Leap 15.0, Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS, and FreeBSD 12.0 (both with its default LLVM Clang compiler and when opting for GCC 8.3). The stock OS packages are used on each platform unless otherwise noted.

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Multimedia and Graphics: GStreamer, AMDVLK and DRM Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GStreamer Editing Services OpenTimelineIO support

    OpenTimelineIO is an Open Source API and interchange format for editorial timeline information, it basically allows some form of interoperability between the different post production Video Editing tools. It is being developed by Pixar and several other studios are contributing to the project allowing it to evolve quickly.

    We, at Igalia, recently landed support for the GStreamer Editing Services (GES) serialization format in OpenTimelineIO, making it possible to convert GES timelines to any format supported by the library. This is extremely useful to integrate GES into existing Post production workflow as it allows projects in any format supported by OpentTimelineIO to be used in the GStreamer Editing Services and vice versa.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 Brings More Performance Optimizations, DXVK Corruption Fixes

    AMD this morning released AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 as the newest tagged update to their open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux graphics driver. 

    The AMDVLK 2019.Q2.2 update is notable in that it has performance optimizations for Total War: WARHAMMER II, Talos Principle, and Thrones of Britannia. These were among the games we pointed out earlier this month in our recent RADV vs. AMDVLK driver benchmarking where previously AMDVLK performed much better but less so in that recent comparison. So it looks like the AMDVLK vs. RADV driver performance is back to some healthy competition. 

  • MSM DRM Driver Bringing Zap Shader Support To Exit Secure Mode On Adreno 600 Series

    The Freedreno MSM DRM driver changes have been submitted to DRM-Next ahead of Linux 5.2. MSM provides the Direct Rendering Manager support around Qualcomm Adreno hardware and with this next kernel cycle is continuing to see better Adreno 600 series support. 

    The primary addition to MSM with Linux 5.2 is zap shader support. A "zap" shader is a way for Adreno hardware to exit its secure mode via a series of specialized commands as accessing the registers directly for exiting the GPU secure mode is generally locked down by the bootloader. 

OpenJDK 11 Now The Default Java For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS - Plus Some New OpenJDK Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Canonical has shifted the default Java of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS from OpenJDK 10 to OpenJDK 11. Plus here are some fresh OpenJDK 8/11/12 benchmarks on this Ubuntu Long Term Support release.

Ubuntu 18.04 has shifted from OpenJDK 10 to 11 since OpenJDK 11 is a long-term support release and thus better aligned with Ubuntu 18.04 being an LTS release itself than continuing to use OpenJDK 10 or the latest 12 release. This shouldn't come as a surprise as February of last year we wrote how Ubuntu 18.04 LTS would likely ship with OpenJDK 10 and then transition to 11 when ready.

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Nvidia Uses "Open Source" for Marketing of Expensive Hardware

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Nvidia to publish open source version of Quake II RTX

    HEXUS shared the Quake II RTX video as an appendage to the news about real-time raytracing coming to the GTX 1060 or higher, back in March, during the GTC 2019 event. In brief, the video was presented by Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang during the opening keynote of GTC 2019. The demo's real-time ray traced global illumination and reflections, HDR visuals, dynamic direct and indirect lighting effects, mimicked physical material light reflection properties, and volumetric lighting effects were met with rapturous applause by GTC attendees.

  • NVIDIA To Transform Quake II RTX Demo Into An Open Source Retro Gaming Classic

    Applause broke out from the crowd at GTC 2019 when NVIDIA showcased a modded version of Quake II with overhauled graphics featuring real-time ray tracing and HDR visuals. Quake II RTX, as it is called, looks almost like a completely different game than the original version that launched over two decades ago. It was an impressive demo for sure, but NVIDIA has bigger plans for the mod.

    "Our goal is to publish an open source version of Quake II RTX," Principal DevTech Engineer and Quake II RTX's lead programmer, Alexey Panteleev, told AusGamers in an interview.

  • NVIDIA To Release Open Source Version Of The Quake II RTX Demo In The Future

    Last month, during GDC 2019, NVIDIA showed an impressive Quake II RTX demo, which showed how ray tracing can improve even old games, and it seems like players will soon be able to experience it for themselves.

    Speaking with Aus Gamers, Alexey Panteleev, the lead programmer of the Quake II RTX demo, confirmed that an open source version of it will be released in the future.

NVIDIA on LInux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

    As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors.

    The NVIDIA 418.52.05 beta driver released on Friday now officially supports the company's Vulkan ray-tracing extension going back to GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. The line-up going back to the GeForce GTX 1060, including the Volta-based Titan V and Turing GTX 1600 series now has the ability to utilize Vulkan-powered ray-tracing. This is nice for developers though for Linux end-users/gamers there isn't any significant available yet utilizing Vulkan ray-tracing besides a few code samples and some early engine work for allowing the functionality; most of the ray-tracing activity has been on the Windows side and focused on DirectX 12, but hopefully that will change.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose

    In our last blogpost NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we did found out, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already pre-installed on this great ARM board.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Upgrade Docker Engine

    In our last blogposts about the NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction and NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we know, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already installed, but…

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2

    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release.

    Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.

  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN

    To all X.Org Foundation Members:

    The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019.

    Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms.

    There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/

    The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting.

    Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote:

    Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/

    If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org.

    When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference.

    For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates.

    After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button.

    After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast.

    Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members.

    Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee

  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections

    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections.

    At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

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OpenBSD 6.5 Released With RETGUARD, OpenRSYNC

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Sad News! Scientific Linux is Being Discontinued

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today's leftovers

  • Announcing Akademy 2019 in Milan, Italy (September 7th - 13th)
    Akademy 2019 will be held at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Milan, Italy, from Saturday the 7th to Friday the 13th of September. The conference is expected to draw hundreds of attendees from the global KDE community to discuss and plan the future of the community and its technology. Many participants from the broad Free and Open Source software community, local organizations and software companies will also attend. KDE e.V. is organizing Akademy 2019 with unixMiB — the Linux User Group of the University of Milano-Bicocca. unixMiB aims to spread Open Source philosophy among students.
  • Checking out Crunchbang++
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Picks Up Conservative Rasterization Support
    On top of Intel's new open-source OpenGL driver seeing some hefty performance optimizations, the Iris Gallium3D driver has picked up another OpenGL extension ahead of the Mesa 19.1 branching.  Iris Gallium3D now supports INTEL_conservative_rasterization alongside the existing support in the i965 driver. INTEL_conservative_rasterization is the several year old Intel extension for seeing if all fragments are at least partially covered by a polygon rather than the default rasterization mode of including fragments with at least one sample covered by a polygon.