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Graphics/Benchmarks

GPUs and Graphics on Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • California Technology Company Launches Fixed-Price Unlimited GPU Rental Platform For Deep and Machine Learning Projects

    GPULab is a turnkey JupyterLab Notebook environment atop a feature-packed Ubuntu Linux operating system.

  • RADV Open-Source Radeon Vulkan Driver Begins Landing Ray-Tracing Changes - Phoronix

    In recent months RADV lead developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen began working on Vulkan ray-tracing support for this Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver that isn't officially supported by AMD but as an alternative to the company's open-source AMDVLK driver or their cross-platform proprietary Vulkan driver. Hitting the Mesa 21.2-devel code a few minutes ago is the initial Vulkan ray-tracing bits for RADV!

    Landing in Mesa 21.2-devel this Friday evening is implementing most of the acceleration structures with BVH building both for CPU and GPU-side builds.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: To The Nines

    In short, an issue was filed recently about getting the Nine state tracker working with zink.

    Was it the first? No..

    Was it the first one this year? Yes.

    Thus began a minutes-long, helter-skelter sequence of events to get Nine up and running, spread out over the course of a day or two. In need of a skilled finagler knowledgeable in the mysterium of Gallium state trackers, I contacted the only developer I know with a rockstar name, Axel Davy. We set out at dawn, and I strapped on my parachute. It was almost immediately that I heard a familiar call: there’s a build issue.

  • Pending Patches Allow Direct3D 9 "Gallium Nine" To Run Over Mesa's Zink Vulkan - Phoronix

    Mesa's Zink is well known for working to provide a generic OpenGL implementation over the Vulkan API that can be used across hardware/drivers. While still focused on OpenGL-over-Vulkan, with some pending patches it turns out Zink can support Gallium3D Nine for ultimately allowing Direct3D 9 atop this layer.

    Valve contractor Mike Blumenkrantz who continues making impressive progress on Zink recently took to getting the Gallium3D Nine state tracker working with Zink.

Mir 2.4, enhancing digital signage and smart screen development

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Another cycle brings another release of Mir, with new features and new innovative use cases. For those of you new to Mir, our flexible display server provides a set of libraries and Wayland compositor for building Wayland-based shells with integrated window management. It is widely used in different IoT applications, including digital signage solutions and desktops shells. And today, Canonical is launching Mir 2.4, a new version of Mir that improves Mir interfaces for graphics platforms to make them more suitable for use on hybrid systems.

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Graphics: Wayland in KDE and Mike Blumenkrantz on Zink

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • KDE Goals Update – June 2021

    With every recent Plasma update (and especially the just released version 5.22) the list of features that are X11 exclusive gets smaller and smaller.

    Conversely, many users may not be aware that the opposite is also happening: every day there are more features available on Wayland that cannot be found on X11!

    There are many resources available describing the security advantages of Wayland over X11, but the ageing protocol has some other shortcomings as well. For example, the last update we highlighted was the recently released VRR support in 5.22. Among other things, this enables an important use case for me: it allows each of my connected displays to operate at their highest refresh rate. I have a 144Hz main display, but occasionally I plug in my TV, which works at 60Hz. Because of limitations of X11, for everything to work, my main display needs to be limited to 60Hz when both of them are active. But not any more thanks to Wayland!

    While the KDE developers always try to bring new functionalities to all users, the above example shows that sometimes, either due to X11 limitations or for other reasons, feature parity will not be possible.

    [...]

    As announced on the community mailing list and the Goals matrix room, there was a meeting last Monday to discuss the way forward with the huge list of topics mentioned in the previous update.

    In the meeting, the conclusion was to start with the topics regarding the different platforms we support, as well as the automation of the build/release process of apps.

    Taking advantage of the upcoming Akademy, the topics will be discussed during the BoF sessions. Check out the schedule to see when you can attend! Also, don’t miss the “Creating Plasma Mobile apps” BoF!

    Of course, like the other Goal Champions, Aleix will have a talk on the first day of Akademy, don’t miss it!

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Suballocate Me

    There’s a lot that goes into this item. The post you’re reading now isn’t about to go so far as to claim that zink(-wip) is usable for gaming. No, that day is still far, far away. But this post is going to be the first step.

    To begin with, a riddle: what change was made to zink between these two screenshots?

    [...]

    A suballocator is a mechanism by which small blocks of memory can be suballocated out of larger one. For example, if I want to allocate an 64byte chunk of memory, I could allocate it directly and get my block, or I could allocate a 4096byte chunk of memory and then take 64bytes out of it.

    When performance is involved, it’s important to consider the time-cost of allocations, and so yes, it’s useful to have already allocated another 63 instances of 64bytes when I need a second one, but there’s another, deeper issue that’s also necessary to address, especially as it relates to gaming: 32bit environments.

    In a 32bit process, the amount of address space available is limited to 4GB, regardless of how much actual memory is physically present, some of which is dedicated to system resources and unavailable for general use. Any time a buffer or image is mapped by the driver in a process, this uses up address space in order to create an addressable region of memory that can be read or written to. Once all the address space has been used up, no other resources can be mapped, and it becomes impossible to continue normal operations.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Hits Another "Massively Improved Performance" Milestone - Phoronix

    The Zink component to Mesa that provides a generic OpenGL implementation built atop the Vulkan API recently hit another "massively improved performance" milestone by Valve contractor Mike Blumenkrantz.

    Mike began work on a suballocator for Zink that is based on the Gallium3D auxiliary/pipebuffer code originally started by the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. After making significant changes to that code, Zink's new suballocator implementation is showing off significant performance improvements in just shy of 700 lines of new code.

AMD EPYC 7343 / EPYC 7443 Linux Performance Review

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the AMD EPYC 7003 "Milan" series launch back in March we have carried out many benchmarks with their flagship processors like the EPYC 7763 and 7713 processors and some of the frequency optimized SKUs, but what about the performance lower down the product stack? Up for benchmarking today is a look at the AMD EPYC 7343 and 7743 processors in 1P and 2P configurations against other AMD EPYC Milan processors as well as Intel's Xeon Platinum 8380 Ice Lake processors.

The AMD EPYC 7343 is a 16-core processor with SMT for 32 threads. This 190 Watt server processor has a 3.2GHz base clock frequency and can boost up to 3.9GHz while having a 128MB L3 cache.

The AMD EPYC 7443 meanwhile is a step higher with 24 cores / 48 threads while the base frequency drops to 2.85GHz but a boost clock up to 4.0GHz. The EPYC 7443 has a 200 Watt TDP and 128MB of L3 cache.

As is standard for AMD's straight-forward EPYC processor line-up, all of these EPYC 7003 series processors support eight channels of DDR4-3200, 128 lanes of PCI Express 4.0, Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV), and other features in common throughout all their SKUs. The EPYC 7343 carries a 1Ku price of around $1565 USD while the EPYC 7443 is at around $2010.

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Intel Xe Graphics Squeeze Out More Linux Performance By Flushing Less

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel's "Gen12" Xe Graphics should be performing marginally better with next quarter's Mesa 21.2 feature release for its open-source ANV Vulkan driver.

Merged today into Mesa 21.2-devel is an ANV driver improvement to reduce the tile and data cache flushing for Gen12. This in turn translates into small but measurable performance improvements across a variety of workloads.

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Graphics: GravityMark, Mesa, and NVIDIA's Jetson AGX Xavier Industrial Module

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Graphics/Benchmarks

  • GravityMark Launches As Cross-API Graphics Benchmark From Former Unigine Dev - Phoronix

    There's a new, cross-platform, cross-API graphics benchmark out there that is free to download and focused on delivering maximum GPU acceleration support when rendering hundreds of thousands of objects.

    GravityMark is this new GPU benchmark out of Tellusim. Tellusim Technologies develops the Tellusim engine that is focused on professional simulations, visualizations, urban planning, and VR/AR use-cases.

  • Mesa's New "Crocus" OpenGL Driver Is Performing Well For Old Intel Hardware - Phoronix

    Landing this week in Mesa 21.2's development code is Crocus Gallium3D providing a new Intel OpenGL driver for i964 "Gem4" through Haswell "Gen7" graphics. While even Haswell graphics are showing their age these days, I couldn't help but to fire up a few benchmarks seeing how this new Crocus open-source OpenGL driver performs against the existing "i965" classic open-source driver for Linux systems.

  • NVIDIA Launches The Jetson AGX Xavier Industrial Module - Phoronix

    Given the success and popularity of their Jetson AGX developer board, NVIDIA has now launched the Jetson AGX Xavier Industrial Module that is a rugged, module-based version of the AGX Xavier intended for various industrial / manufacturing / construction use-cases.

    For those wanting AI and deep learning at the edge, NVIDIA is announcing today the Jetson AGX Xavier Industrial rugged system-on-module that is pin compatible with the existing Jetson AGX Xavier board. This module is intended for "AI at the edge in harsh environments where safety and reliability is a critical priority...The Jetson AGX Xavier Industrial is targeted for applications in industrial, aerospace, defense, construction, agriculture, logistics, inventory management, delivery, inspection and healthcare. Applications enabled across these sectors include worker and site safety, site access and monitoring, and inspection in hazardous and harsh environments, among others."

GCC 11 Compiler Performance Benchmarks With Various Optimization Levels, LTO

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent forum discussion stemming from the -O3 optimization level still too unsafe for the Linux kernel (in part due to older, buggy compilers) and some users wondering about the current -O2 versus -O3 compiler optimization level impact, here is a fresh round of reference benchmarks using GCC 11.1 on Fedora Workstation 33 looking at various optimization levels and optimizations tested on dozens of different application benchmarks to see the overall impact on performance.

With the recent optimization level discussions and not having done any thorough optimization level comparison tests and link-time optimization (LTO) testing of the recently released GCC 11, here is this Monday article for those interested in compiler optimizations.

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Graphics: Panfrost, NVIDIA, and AMDVLK

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Open Source OpenGL ES 3.1 on Mali GPUs with Panfrost

    Panfrost, the open source driver for Arm Mali, now supports OpenGL ES 3.1 on both Midgard (Mali T760 and newer) and Bifrost (Mali G31, G52, G76) GPUs. OpenGL ES 3.1 adds a number of features on top of OpenGL ES 3.0, notably including compute shaders. While Panfrost has had limited support for compute shaders on Midgard for use in TensorFlow Lite, the latest work extends the support to more GPUs and adds complementary features required by the OpenGL ES 3.1 specification, like indirect draws and no-attachment framebuffers.

    The new feature support represents the cumulative effort of multiple Collaborans -- Boris Brezillon, Italo Nicola, and myself -- in tandem with the wider Mesa community. The OpenGL driver has seen over 1000 commits since the beginning of 2021, including several hundred targeting OpenGL ES 3.1 features. Our focus is Mali G52, where we are passing essentially all drawElements Quality Program and Khronos conformance tests and are aiming to become formally conformant. Nevertheless, thanks to a unified driver, many new features on Bifrost trickle down to Midgard allowing the older architecture still in wide use to improve long after the vendor has dropped support. On Mali T860, we are passing about 99.5% of tests required for conformant OpenGL ES 3.1. That number can only grow thanks to Mesa's continuous integration running these tests for every merge request and preventing Panfrost regressions. With a Vulkan driver in the works, Panfrost's API support is looking good.

  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti / RTX 3080 Ti Compute + Renderer Performance Benchmarks Review - Phoronix

    With last week's launch of the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and this week's launch of the GeForce RTX 3070 Ti there have been plenty of Linux gaming benchmarks on Phoronix. But for those interested in these new RTX 30 Ampere graphics cards for GPU compute or rendering workloads, in this article are many benchmarks on that front compared to various RTX 20 and RTX 30 series graphics cards.

  • AMDVLK 2021.Q2.5 Released As A Minor Radeon Vulkan Driver Update - Phoronix

    Following the last AMDVLK update at the end of May, AMD has released AMDVLK 2021.Q2.4 as their newest open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan driver release.

    This AMDVLK 2021.Q2.5 release is fairly small and just rebuilds against the Vulkan 1.2.179 headers plus has two bug fixes. The fixes involve corruption while running Wayland render tests and a capture issue with the Radeon Graphics Profiler and RenderDoc.

Linux Kernel and Graphics Leftovers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Old Motorola 68000 Systems Can Finally Move Away From Linux's Deprecated IDE Code - Phoronix

    Earlier this year was talk of Linux finally removing its legacy IDE subsystem that has been deprecated for years in favor of just maintaining the still-supported libata code for IDE support. The libata path is much better supported and matured for nearly two decades, but one of the holdouts was some Motorola 68000 series hardware -- like early Macintosh computers -- not being supported outside of the legacy context. That is finally set to change with Linux 5.14 so in turn the legacy IDE code will likely be able to be removed soon.

    The Motorola 68000 "m68k" series is still popular with some enthusiasts and found in early Apple Macintosh computers. Two m68k class drivers not having libata equivalents was one of the rare scenarios where the legacy IDE code within the Linux kernel is still used.

  • HW News - Dell Class Action Lawsuit, NVIDIA DLSS on Linux, AMD x Samsung GPUs | GamersNexus - Gaming PC Builds & Hardware Benchmarks

    On top of the RTX 3080 Ti and 3070 Ti announcements, Nvidia also announced expanded DLSS support -- namely that DLSS is coming to Linux. Nvidia’s DLSS will be delivered through Steam’s Proton, a compatibility layer based on Wine, which Linux users have long relied on to play Windows games on Linux distros.

    Previously, Nvidia’s DLSS had two exclusive requirements: An RTX GPU and a Windows OS. It appears as if Nvidia is starting to take Linux gaming a bit more seriously, which also aligns with Valve’s previous declaration to better support Linux. Nvidia claims that DLSS support for Vulcan titles is coming later this month, and that support for DirectX games will come this fall.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver For Open-Source Arm Mali Graphics Now Has OpenGL ES 3.1 - Phoronix

    Merged today into Mesa 21.2-devel is OpenGL ES 3.1 support being exposed for the Panfrost Gallium3D driver that provides open-source Arm Mali graphics.

    Panfrost lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig landed more than 100 patches today for Panfrost into Mesa Git. These 100+ commits in the single merge request amount to a wide variety of OpenGL conformance fixes.

Linux Graphics Leftovers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Microsoft's Hyper-V DRM Display Driver Will Land For Linux 5.14 [Ed: Microsoft turning 'Linux' into proprietary software of Microsoft]

    Last summer Microsoft engineers posted a DRM kernel display driver for their Hyper-V synthetic video device. One year later after going through a few rounds of code review, this Hyper-V DRM driver will be going mainline with the upcoming Linux 5.14 kernel cycle.

  • Intel Finishes Linux 5.14 Graphics Driver Feature Work With More Alder Lake P Code

    Intel's open-source graphics driver engineers have sent in their final feature pull request to DRM-Next of new material they are wanting incorporated into Linux 5.14.

  • I'm Gonna Pretend I Didn't See That

    At present, mainline zink uses a hammer-and-nail methodology that I came up with last year: the total amount of GPU memory in use by resources in a given cmdbuf is tracked, and that amount is tracked per-context. If the in-use context memory exceeds a threshold of the total VRAM, the driver stalls, thereby freeing up all the resources that are in use so they can be recycled into new ones.

    There’s a number of problems with this approach, but the biggest one is that it fails to account for cases like a AAA game that just uses as much memory as it can in order to optimize performance/resolution/graphics. I discovered such a case some time ago while running Tomb Raider, and then I set out to improve things since it was costing me about 10% of my perf on the title screen.

    The annoying part of this problem is that the piglit test is a very uncommon case, and it’s tricky to handle it in a way that doesn’t also impact other cases which appear similar but need to not get memory-clamped. As a result, it’s tough to really do anything based on “overall” memory usage.

    In the end, what I decided on was using the per-cmdbuf memory usage counter to trigger a check for completed cmdbufs on submit, iterating over all the pending ones to check whether they’ve completed, resetting them and freeing associated resources when possible. This yields good memory reclaiming behavior for problem cases while leaving games like Tomb Raider untouched and definitely not deadlocking or anything like that.

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More in Tux Machines

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today's leftovers

  • LHS Episode #416: The Weekender LXXIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Donation button removed

    Over the years, I have blown hot and cold over whether to have a donation button. Did take it down for awhile, about a year ago I think. I received an email asking if can send me a bank cheque, which reminded me about that donation button. I declined the offer. I really don't need donations. It is really my pleasure to upload blog reports about EasyOS, Puppy, DIY hiking gear, and all the rest that have posted about. Ibiblio.org is still very kindly hosting downloads, and I also went back to the Puppy Forum.

  • Akademy 2021 – I

    I am still digesting the load of information that Marc Mutz gave in his intense training session last night between 6 and almost 11 p.m. about C++/STL history, containers, iterators, allocators, the Non-Owning Interface Idiom and all that other good stuff. Great job Marc.

  • Stuck Updates Fix

    When rolling out a new feature that lets you skip (offline) updates on boot-up earlier this week we have messed up and also brought in a nasty bug that prevents updates from applying. Unfortunately we can’t automatically rectify this problem because, well, updates are never applied. In case you find Discover showing the same updates over and over again, even after rebooting to apply the update, you may be affected.

  • AWS SSM Parameters

    If you are not familiar with the Parameter Store it provides hierarchical storage for config data, strings, and other values. As well as being used for storing private information the parameter store provides a public namespace for SUSE, /aws/service/suse, which is now being leveraged to provide the latest image id’s for all active SUSE images.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Steam on ChromeOS: Not a Rumor Anymore - Boiling Steam

    If you follow us or other sources like Chrome Unboxed you are by now aware that there’s ample rumors about Google/Valve working on bringing Steam on ChromeOS. We know the technology pieces are there, as recently discussed with Luke Short in our recent podcast. However, we are still waiting for an official announcement that would turn the expected rumors into reality.

  • First American Financial Pays Farcical $500K Fine

    In May 2019, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that the website of mortgage settlement giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] was leaking more than 800 million documents — many containing sensitive financial data — related to real estate transactions dating back 16 years. This week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settled its investigation into the matter after the Fortune 500 company agreed to pay a paltry penalty of less than $500,000.

  • How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

    Estonia is no stranger to the cyber threat posed by Russia. Back in 2007, a decision to relocate a Soviet-era war memorial from central Tallinn to a military cemetery sparked a diplomatic spat with its neighbor and former overlord. There were protests and angry statements from Russian diplomats. And just as the removal works started, Estonia became the target of what was at the time the biggest cyberattack against a single country.

    The Estonian government called the incident an act of cyberwarfare and blamed Russia for it. Moscow has denied any involvement.

    The attack made Estonia realize that it needed to start treating cyber threats in the same way as physical attacks.

  • Most Businesses That Pay Off After Ransomware Hack Hit With Second Attack: Study [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The study surveyed nearly 1,300 security professionals around the world and found that 80 percent of businesses that paid after a ransomware attack suffered a second attack. Of those hit a second time, 46 percent believed it came from the same group that did the first attack.

    Censuswide, which performed the study on behalf of the international cybersecurity company Cybereason, found that 25 percent of organizations hit by a ransomware attack were forced to close. In addition, 29 percent were forced to eliminate jobs.

Kernel: Oracle, UPower, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Oracle Sends Out Latest Linux Patches So Trenchboot Can Securely Launch The Kernel - Phoronix

    Trenchboot continues to be worked on for providing boot integrity technologies that allow for multiple roots of trust around boot security and integrity. Oracle engineers on Friday sent out their latest Linux kernel patches so it can enjoy a "Secure Launch" by the project's x86 dynamic launch measurements code. The latest kernel patches are a second revision to patches sent out last year around the Trenchboot launch support for enhancing the integrity and security of the boot process. This kernel work goes along with Trenchboot support happening for GRUB.

  • Nearly A Decade Later, UPower Still Working Towards 1.0 Release

    For nearly one decade there has been talk of UPower 1.0 while in 2021 that still has yet to materialize for this former "DeviceKit-Power" project but at least now there is UPower v0.99.12 as the first release in two years. UPower 1.0 has yet to materialize and it certainly isn't advancing these days like it was in the early 2010s. With Thursday's UPower 0.99.12 release the key changes to land over the past two years are supporting more device types and power reporting for newer Apple iPhone smartphones like the iPhone XR, XS, and other newer models.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. Tracing in the Linux kernel is constantly improving. Tracing was officially added to Linux in 2008. Since then, more tooling has been constantly added to help out with visibility. The work is still ongoing, with Perf, ftrace, Lttng, and eBPF. User space tooling is expanding and as the kernel gets more complex, so does the need for facilitating seeing what is going on under the hood.