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Samsung Tizen OS is now the Largest TV Platform

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OS

According to the latest numbers, the Tizen OS is the largest TV streaming platform in the world. The OS has been developed by Samsung which is then used in smart TVs and smartwatches.

The research conducted by the market research company, Strategy Analytics, has said that Samsung had sold 11.8 million TVs worldwide during Q3 2020. As well as this, it has been suggested that over 155 million Tizen based TVs that are in current use. Compared to the last year, Samsung has made an increase in sales of 23%.

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Multi-touch Gestures in elementary OS 6

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OS

One of the most hotly requested features for years has been to have multi-touch gestures in elementary OS, and with 6.0 I’m excited to say that we will deliver. Like the dark style preference, delivering a great multi-touch experience is a little more complicated than it seems on the surface. There have been some 3rd party tools to detect touchpad gestures and then trigger actions after-the-fact, but it wasn’t until recently that we’ve had the technical ability to provide smooth, responsive animations that track 1:1 with your finger movement across a touchpad or touch screen.

We’ve had the great pleasure of working with José Expósito, the author of Touchégg, on our window manager gestures. In elementary OS 6, we use Touchégg Daemon behind the scenes to capture input events and communicate them to Gala, our window manager.

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Also: elementary OS 6 to get great looking multi-touch gestures

Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 20.11

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OS

With Genode 20.11, we focused on the scalability of real-world application workloads, and nurtured Genode's support for 64-bit ARM hardware. We thereby follow the overarching goal to run highly sophisticated Genode-based systems on devices of various form factors.

When speaking of real-world workloads, we acknowledge that we cannot always know the exact behavior of applications. The system must deal gracefully with many unknowns: The roles and CPU intensity of threads, the interplay of application code with I/O, memory-pressure situations, or the sudden fragility of otherwise very useful code. The worst case must always be anticipated. In traditional operating systems, this implies that the OS kernel needs to be aware of certain behavioral patterns of the applications, and has to take decisions based on heuristics. Think of CPU scheduling, load balancing among CPU cores, driving power-saving features of the hardware, memory swapping, caching, and responding to near-fatal situations like OOM.

Genode allows us to move such complex heuristics outside the kernel into dedicated components. Our new CPU balancer described in Section CPU-load balancing is a living poster child of our approach. With this optional component, a part of a Genode system can be subjected to a CPU-load balancing policy of arbitrary complexity without affecting the quality of service of unrelated components, and without polluting the OS kernel with complexity.

A second aspect of real-world workloads is that they are usually not designed for Genode. To accommodate the wealth of time tested applications, we need to bridge the massive gap between APIs of olde (think of POSIX) and Genode's clean-slate interfaces. Section Streamlined ioctl handling in the C runtime / VFS shows how the current release leverages our novel VFS concept for the emulation of traditional ioctl-based interfaces. So useful existing applications come to live without compromising the architectural benefits of Genode.

Platform-wise, the new release continues our mission to host Genode-based systems such as Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware. This work entails intensive development of device drivers and the overall driver architecture. Section Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware (i.MX8 EVK) reports on the achievement of bringing Sculpt to 64-bit i.MX8 hardware. This line of work goes almost hand in hand with the improvements of our custom virtual machine monitor for ARM as outlined in Section Multicore virtualization on ARM.

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Also: Genode OS Framework 20.11 Brings Dynamic CPU Load Balancing, 64-bit ARM Sculpt OS

Why Aren’t Viruses a Problem on Chrome OS?

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OS

Chrome OS has a reputation for being virus-proof. Google likes to boast about how secure its operating system is compared to others. Are Chromebooks really immune to viruses, though? And, if so, how do they achieve this? Allow us to explain.

First, let’s consider what a computer virus actually is. Viruses fall under the umbrella of “malware.” They’re destructive because they inject a code into a file (usually, one that’s executable), and when that file is run, the malicious code is released.

Once the code is released on your system, it can do any number of malicious things, like destroy data, overwrite files, or even replicate itself and spread to other systems.

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Best USB bootable distros of 2020

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OS

Trimmed distros aren’t only designed for ageing hardware. In fact, there are several lean distros that have been pruned and tuned and optimized for booting off of USB.

There are several uses for shoving Linux distros inside a USB flash drive. For instance, they can be quite handy when you need to use somebody else’s computer. Or, perhaps you need to boot into a live Linux environment to troubleshoot issues with your computer, or perhaps to transfer data from a dying disk.

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MuditaOS: A Beautiful and Minimal Open Source Mobile Operating System

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OS
OSS

MuditaOS is a beautiful, minimal open-source operating system for mobile phones. Unlike other mobile phone operating systems, however, the developers behind MuditaOS are not interested in smartphones. Instead, they aim to take us to the era before the smartphone craze that has lead to distrust for big tech companies, but with a far cooler style.

Developing this mobile operating system has admittedly been a challenge to the team and they are excited to have come up with a beautifully designed E Ink OS, which they have open-sourced to meet the modern user’s desire for transparency without compromising quality.

When the company developed and open-source the operating system, they announced that open-sourcing the OS goes along the lines of their “You’re happy – I’m Happy” philosophy and this makes even more sense when you understand that Mudita is from the Sanskrit word “Mudit” which translates to ‘Happy‘.

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Music Production on Guix System

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OS
GNU

The working title “Ode to One Two Oh” was an obvious choice, being a quasi-palindrome, and its five syllables suggested a time signature of 5/4. Where to from here?

As I stared at my Emacs session with a Guile REPL (read, eval, print, loop) buffer I tried to recall what the letters “REPL” stand for. Clearly, in my case the “P” was for “Procrastination”, but what about the others? I had stumbled upon the chorus: a description of the Guix development process. Contribute as others before us have shared their contributions (Reciprocation), review patches and discuss (Evaluation), hack on something else (Procrastination), and repeat (Loop).

The words suggested a simple descending melody, which would need to be elevated by a somewhat less simple chord progression. After trying out a few harmonies on the Grand Stick I remembered how terrible my memory was and decided that I would need to scatter the harmonies onto a canvas, listen to the whole progression, and adjust the lines as needed — all without having to build up muscle memory for harmonies and progressions I may very well end up discarding in the process.

This is where my composition workflow probably deviates from most other people. Many would use a MIDI sequencer for that kind of approach, whereas I decided to hone in on the exact harmonies with an unlikely tool: the unparalleled music engraving application Lilypond. Lilypond sports a versatile language that covers primitive note input, the means of combining them to larger phrases and musical ideas, and the means of abstraction — it allows for musical ideas to be named and recombined in different shapes. For everything the language doesn’t account for with specialized syntax I can simply switch to Guile Scheme. No other notation software is as flexible and malleable as Lilypond. I let it generate both sheet music and a MIDI file — the sheet music is displayed in a PDF viewer in Emacs and the MIDI file sent to fluidsynth (because I trust my ears over my eyes).

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Pro1 X smartphone with physical keyboard passes $500,000 via Indiegogo

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OS
Android
Ubuntu

If you are searching for a smartphone with a physical keyboard you may be interested in the Pro1 X smartphone, a device capable of running a number of different operating systems including Android, Ubuntu, Lineage and more. Launched by Indiegogo earlier this month the campaign has already raised over $500,000 thanks to over 850 backers with still 16 days remaining.

Early bird pledges are now available for the innovative project from roughly $679 or £507, offering a considerable discount of approximately 24% off the recommended retail price, while the crowd funding campaign is under way. If the Pro1 X Indiegogo campaign is successful and the project progresses smoothly, worldwide shipping is expected to take place sometime around March 2021. To learn more about the Pro1 X project review the promotional video below.

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Manjaro ARM Beta3 for PinePhone brings camera, phone call, and gesture improvements

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OS
Linux

The latest beta of Manjaro ARM for the PinePhone brings a series of software updates and bug fixes.

The kernel and default web browser, camera app, keyboard, and chat applications have all received updates. Phone call audio quality has been improved. And you you can now close applications by swiping upward on the thumbnail image in the task switcher.

Manjaro ARM Beta3 with Phosh for the PinePhone is available for download from OSDN, and you can flash it to a microSD card using balenaEtcher or a similar tool.

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Latest Chromium OS build for the GPD Pocket 1 and 2 brings hardware, software fixes for these mini-laptops

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OS

The GPD Pocket and Pocket 2 are tiny laptops small enough to fold up and slide into (some) pockets… thus the name. With 7 inch touchscreen displays and QWERTY keyboards, they’re about as small as you can get while still supporting touch-typing on a laptop.

GPD ships the Pocket mini-laptops with Windows 10 software, but independent developers have been porting alternate operating systems for years. You can run GNU/Linux distributions (there’s even a version of Ubuntu MATE designed for these little PCs). And developer Keith Myers has been offering up builds of Chromium OS for those that want to turn their GPD devices into tiny Chromebooks.

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  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

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  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

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  • Updated Docker pages

Jetson Xavier system bundles LIPSedge 3D vision camera

LIPS’ IP67-protected “LIPSedge AE400” 3D vision industrial camera is now available with Aaeon’s Linux-driven, AGX Xavier based Boxer-8240AI computer. The RK3399-based camera is built around an Intel RealSense D415 and offers GbE with PoE. Aaeon announced that its Boxer-8240AI edge AI system based on Nvidia’s high-end Jetson AGX Xavier module has received Nvidia Isaac Certification for a bundle that combines the compact, embedded system with LIPS Corp’s LIPSedge AE400 Industrial 3D Camera. The camera is billed as an industrial version of the Intel RealSense dual-lens stereovision camera. Applications for the Aaeon/LIPS offering include autonomous guided vehicles (AGV), vision guided robots, and smart factory systems. Read more

Release of t2 GNU/Linux 20.10

  • T2 20.10 tagged and shipping!

    A decade in the making, T2 version 20.10 was finally tagged and shipped! Grab your favorite release ISO, e.g. highly optimized AMD64, PPC64 for your PS3, MIPS64 for your Sgi Octane or any other of our release builds for playing along at home!

  • t2 Linux 20.10 released

    The 20.10 release of the t2 Linux distribution is available.

Canonical/Ubuntu: FOSDEM 2021 Community DevRoom, Snap Store and Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

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    The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event.

  • When you need the numbers just right – benchmark and profiling applications in the Snap Store | Ubuntu

    The world of software is a vast and complex one, often too difficult to easily assess by human intuition alone. Which is why detailed and accurate measurements of software behavior are essential in helping us understand and gauge how well our applications perform. The Snap Store has a fair share of productivity tools and utilities, including a wide range of benchmarking and profiling tools. These are designed to help developers, system administrators and hardcore enthusiasts get a precise sense of their software, whether as part of research and design or for troubleshooting ongoing problems in production environments. Let’s have a little tour.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

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