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Hardware

NVIDIA on LInux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

    As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors.

    The NVIDIA 418.52.05 beta driver released on Friday now officially supports the company's Vulkan ray-tracing extension going back to GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. The line-up going back to the GeForce GTX 1060, including the Volta-based Titan V and Turing GTX 1600 series now has the ability to utilize Vulkan-powered ray-tracing. This is nice for developers though for Linux end-users/gamers there isn't any significant available yet utilizing Vulkan ray-tracing besides a few code samples and some early engine work for allowing the functionality; most of the ray-tracing activity has been on the Windows side and focused on DirectX 12, but hopefully that will change.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose

    In our last blogpost NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we did found out, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already pre-installed on this great ARM board.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Upgrade Docker Engine

    In our last blogposts about the NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction and NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we know, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already installed, but…

Devices: Security, Microsoft, ASRock and QNAP

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • The Cybersecurity Weakest Link – Linux and IOT

    Linux is not only the backbone of the internet and the Android operating system, it is now expanding into domestic appliances, motor vehicles and pretty much anything else that requires a minimal operating system to run dedicated software. The Internet of Things is very much The Internet of Things Powered by Linux.

    But when Chrysler announced a recall of 1.4 million vehicles back in 2016 after a pair of hackers demonstrated a remote hijack of a Jeep’s digital systems, the risks involved with hacking IoT devices were dramatically illustrated.

    So what does the rise of Linux and IoT mean for Cybersecurity in the Enterprise? Let’s take a look.

  • Microsoft buys Express Logic, adds a third operating system to its IoT range [Ed: Microsoft Peter on Microsoft swallowing another Linux company because Windows is unfit for purpose]

    Not content with having a Windows-based Internet of Things platform (Windows 10 IoT) and a Linux-based Internet of Things platform (Azure Sphere), Microsoft has added a third option. The company has announced that it has bought Express Logic and its ThreadX real-time operating system for an undisclosed sum.

    [...]

    Linux can be built with various options to offer more predictable behavior and so can address some similar scenarios. But ThreadX has another big advantage up its sleeve: it's tiny. A minimal ThreadX installation takes 2,000 bytes of storage and needs 1KB of RAM, far less than Linux can use. By way of comparison, Microsoft's Sphere hardware (which uses a custom-designed ARM processor with various security features embedded) has 4MB of RAM for applications and 16MB of storage. There are an estimated 6.2 billion deployments of ThreadX running on several dozen different kinds of processor or microcontroller.

  • World’s first AMD-based NUC mini-PC showcases Ryzen R1000

    ASRock Linux-ready “iBox-R1000” industrial PC and “NUC-R1000” mainboard provide the new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC in a 4×4 NUC form-factor with up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 3x USB 3.1, triple 4K displays, and 2x M.2 slots.

    In a renewed rivalry with Intel reignited by the success of its Ryzen line of processors, AMD has started to get a bit cheeky with its larger rival. Its latest provocation is the launch (via partner ASRock Industrial) of the first 4×4 (also called 4″x4″) NUC form-factor mini-PC based on an AMD processor. As noted in the Tom’s Hardware story that alerted us to the iBox-R1000 and the board-level NUC-R1000, the NUC label “isn’t technically accurate” since it’s an Intel brand that defines a certain class of mini-PC that uses Intel processors.

    [...]

    The ASRock product page notes only Windows 10, support, but the announcement also says it supports Linux kernel 4.18 and above.

  • QNAP Linux Station Supports Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    QNAP® Systems, Inc. today announced that Linux Station is fully integrated with Ubuntu® 18.04 LTS, allowing users to enjoy the brand-new GNOME GUI desktop with higher security and easily install apps (including LibreOffice 6.0, Inkscape, and multimedia applications) from the Software Center.

    Linux Station provides one-click installation of multiple versions of Ubuntu, and brings a streamlined NAS and Ubuntu PC experience when using an HDMI-equipped QNAP NAS with a keyboard and mouse. Linux Station also supports remote desktop connection with audio output. As QNAP is dedicated to leverage open-source software for a better user experience, Linux Station also adds support for Ubuntu Kylin - the official Chinese version of Ubuntu.

    “QNAP exclusively incorporates Ubuntu into NAS applications to give users multiple benefits from using QTS and Ubuntu applications,” said Judy Chen, Product Manager of QNAP, adding “The increasingly diverse applications in Linux Station allows users to freely utilize cross-platform, open-source software, such as multimedia applications and Inkscape.”

This is how System76 does open hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Most people know very little about the hardware in their computers. As a long-time Linux user, I've had my share of frustration while getting my wireless cards, video cards, displays, and other hardware working with my chosen distribution. Proprietary hardware often makes it difficult to determine why an Ethernet controller, wireless controller, or mouse performs differently than we expect. As Linux distributions have matured, this has become less of a problem, but we still see some quirks with touchpads and other peripherals, especially when we don't know much—if anything—about our underlying hardware.

Companies like System76 aim to take these types of problems out of the Linux user experience. System76 manufactures a line of Linux laptops, desktops, and servers, and even offers its own Linux distro, Pop! OS, as an option for buyers, Recently I had the privilege of visiting System76's plant in Denver for the unveiling of Thelio, its new desktop product line.

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Eclipse IoT survey reveals growing role for Linux and Arm

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The Eclipse Foundation released the results from its latest IoT Developer Survey of 1,717 Eclipse developers, finding growing use of Linux (76 percent), Arm (70 percent), and MQTT (42 percent).

The results of the Eclipse Foundation’s 2019 IoT Developer Survey are out, this time with a larger 1,717-developer sample compared to only 502 in the 2018 survey. The survey was conducted by the Eclipse IoT Working Group in cooperation with member companies including Bosch Software Innovations, Eurotech, and Red Hat. The Eclipse Foundation’s various social media channels and websites promoted the survey, as did Eclipse IoT member companies.

The survey was not limited to embedded developers. Two out of three respondents said their organizations are either deploying Internet of Things solutions now or will do so in the next 18 months. Some projects appear to be longer-range than that considering that 80 percent of respondents said they are active in IoT work.

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Devices: SiFive, AMD and NUC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • SiFive Launches 64-Bit Embedded Core

    SiFive has launched the S2 Core IP Series at the Linley Spring Processor Conference in Santa Clara. The S2 Core IP Series is a 64-bit addition to SiFive’s 2 Series Core IP and brings advanced features to SiFive’s smallest microcontrollers.

    The S2 Series further adds to SiFive’s extensive silicon-proven, embedded core IP portfolio. It comprises the 2, 3, 5, and 7 Core IP Series in E (32-bit) and S (64-bit) variants.

  • AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 Pairs Dual Core Zen CPU + Vega 3 Graphics @ 12~25 Watts
  • Ryzen R1000 SoC offers dual Zen and triple Vega cores with a 12-25W TDP

    The Ryzen Embedded R1000 offers the same Zen CPU and Vega GPU cores as the V1000 while providing “3x generational performance improvement per watt” compared to the R-Series Merlin Falcon. The Linux-friendly chips are hardware and software compatible with the V1000.

  • Fanless NUC

    I didn’t monitor the temperature change too closely. It seems the fanless case keeps my CPU at least 10 degrees Celsius cooler than the Intel case. As the Akasa case is entirely metal it’ll ruin the WiFi/Bluetooth reception. The case does have the option to install an external WiFi antenna, but it doesn’t include the proper wire to do that. I’ve bought that from AliExpress for 5.72 EUR.

Devices: Linux Support on ASRock and Avalue Hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Whiskey Lake shows up on a Linux-friendly industrial mini-PC

    ASRock has unveiled a fanless, Linux-ready “iBox-8265U” mini-PC with Intel’s latest Whiskey Lake CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4, a SATA bay, 2x GbE, 4x USB, triple displays, and extended temp support.

    ASRock Industrial Computer’s 171.8 x 150 x 71.5mm iBox-8265U is the first 8th Gen Whiskey Lake U-series based mini-PC we’ve seen. Several Whiskey Lake based SBCs have broken cover, however, including Aaeon’s UP Xtreme. The FanlessTech story that alerted us to the product calls it a barebone mini-PC, suggesting that the OS is optional. The product page says it supports Linux 4.6 and Windows 10.

  • Intel Core based thin Mini-ITX supports extended temperatures

    Avalue’s Linux-friendly “EMX-KBLU2P” is a thin Mini-ITX board with 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs, triple displays, 2x GbE, 2x SATA, 2x M.2, 4x USB 3.0, serial and GPIO interfaces, and -20 to 70°C support.

    Avalue announced a thin Mini-ITX board for signage, PoS, kiosk, AiO PCs, and industrial applications. Like the company’s EMX-SKLUP thin Mini-ITX board, the new EMX-KBLU2P supports Intel’s 6th Gen Skylake Core and Celeron processors, and it can also load 7th Gen Kaby Lake models. Windows 10 and Linux are on tap — the Kaby Lake configurations require higher than Linux kernel 4.7.

12 Single Board Computers: Alternative to Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Looking for a Raspberry Pi alternative? Here are some other single board computers to satisfy your DIY cravings.

Raspberry Pi is the most popular single board computer right now. You can use it for your DIY projects or can use it as a cost effective system to learn coding or maybe utilize a media server software on it to stream media at your convenience.

You can do a lot of things with Raspberry Pi but it is not the ultimate solution for all kinds of tinkerers. Some might be looking for a cheaper board and some might be on the lookout for a powerful one.

Whatever be the case, we do need Raspberry Pi alternatives for a variety of reasons. So, in this article, we will talk about the best ten single board computers that we think are the best Raspberry Pi alternatives.

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Open Hardware/Modding and 3-D Printing

Filed under
Hardware
  • Open-source and modular WiFi phone is hacker-friendly

    Now running on Kickstarter is a campaign to commercialize a minimalist open-source and hacker-friendly Voice-over-IP phone, which owners could use as a versatile and well-packaged multi-tool for their projects.
    While today's smartphones have evolved into powerful computers, they are often too complex and tightly integrated to be opened-up by the majority of hackers. By design, they also tend to leak private data to third parties (through built-in apps, OS, and network operation). Ben Wilson, the electronic engineer behind California-based HackEDA which officially runs the WiPhone Kickstarter campaign, wants to help users regain control over their phone, a device they can easily take apart or incorporate into different projects, while controlling where the data goes.
    “It's sort of like the phone James Bond would carry if he was also a programmer” explains Wilson, noting that the firmware is open and the hardware is expandable so one could add a LoRA radio, a mega battery back, or cover the back of it with an LED array. While the WiPhone is more intended to be an Arduino-compatible hacking tool than a phone, it is self-contained and also works well as a backup phone to make free VoIP calls over any WiFi connection.

  • Industrial 3D printing goes skateboarding

    Plastic pulled from the waste stream can find new use with the Gigabot X, an open source industrial 3D printer. A team shows how three Gigabot-printed sporting goods -- skateboard decks, kayak paddles and snowshoes -- can help burgeoning makerspaces and fab labs economically sustain their 3D printing centers.

  • RepRap Recyclebot Turns Plastic into 3D Filament for $700
  • Open Source Furniture: Download, Print And Build Online
  • Furniture can Now Be Downloaded and Printed, Thanks to Opendesk

    It seems like anything can be done online nowadays, including getting your furniture! Now, this is not your typical online electronic catalog where you click on your choice of item and somebody comes over to deliver. No. This is something more innovative than that.

  • Maryland students stand to revolutionize Alzheimer's diagnostics: BTN LiveBIG

    Conversely, Synapto uses an open source, 3D-printed portable electroencephalogram (EEG) headset and proprietary mathematical biomarker analyses to comb through a patient’s brainwaves. Their hope is that this will lead to quicker and cheaper diagnosing that can be done in a physician’s office.

AMD: AMDVLK, EPYC and Radeon ROCm

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • AMDVLK 2019.Q2.1 Driver Has Some Performance Enhancement & Fixes

    MD has volleyed their latest AMDVLK open-source Vulkan driver code, their first publish push in more than two weeks, making it their first push of the new quarter.

    AMDVLK 2019.Q2.1 is the new release and it's been updated against the Vulkan 1.1.105 headers, allows shared memory to be CPU-visible, enables VK_EXT_memory_priority regardless whether it's supported by all external queues, and offers a performance optimization for Total War: WARHAMMER II.

  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 5.1 Too - Performance Wins

    Last week I passed along some initial benchmark results after finding Intel Cascade Lake offering up some performance improvements when using the in-development Linux 5.1 kernel. The exciting news is this doesn't appear to be Cascadelake-specific or even Intel specific as with the Dell PowerEdge EPYC 2P server I am also seeing some nice performance improvements in the same benchmarks.

    I am still in the midst of conducting more Linux 5.1 kernel benchmarks albeit perpetually short on time but should have some additional Linux 5.1 data out next week. But in being curious whether Linux 5.1 is also looking up on AMD hardware, I ran some quick Linux 5.0.7 stable benchmarks against the latest Linux 5.1 Git kernel...

  • Radeon ROCm 2.3 Released With Many Improvements

    AMD today unexpectedly released Radeon Open Compute "ROCm" 2.3 as the newest feature release for this open-source Radeon GPU compute stack.

    ROCm 2.3 is a fairly hefty update and includes a lot of library improvements and other tooling enhancements for those using ROCm to provide GPU compute support on Linux systems. ROCm 2.3 offers per-GPU memory usage reporting via the rocm-smi utility, updated ONNX parser handling for MIVisionX, a new Python API and many other improvements to MIGraphX, multi-GPU support for Caffe2, Tensile optimizations for BLAS and other BLAS library improvements, and Int8 support for MIOpen.

Luxmeter Meets Linux

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The hardware in question was a PCE-174 luxmeter, which came with an uncooperative Windows application as standard. This simply wouldn’t do, so [ThePhil] set about developing a Linux version in Python. This was achieved through the aid of documentation, not of the PCE-174, but its sibling from another corporation – the Extech HD450. The two meters were similar enough that the Extech’s better documentation was able to fill in the gaps of [ThePhil]’s understanding.

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More Linux on devices:

  • Toughened up in-vehicle PC offers triple mini-PCIe slots

    DFI’s rugged “VC230-BT” in-vehicle computer is equipped with an Intel Bay Trail SoC with 2x GbE, 5x USB, and 3x serial ports plus 3x mini-PCIe slots for storage and wireless add-ons. DFI has launched a rugged embedded computer for in-vehicle and fleet management applications

  • ZigBee hub builds on Raspberry Pi

    Dresden-Elektronik has launched two ZigBee home automation gateways: an RPi-based “Phoscon Gateway” and a “ConBee II” USB stick. The gateways run the company’s deCONZ Zigbee Gateway software paired with a new mobile app.

    Dresden-Elektronik announced the release of a ZigBee-enabled home automation hub based on a Raspberry Pi 3 SBC, as well as a second-gen USB dongle for enabling laptops and other Linux and Windows computers with a ZigBee gateway. The 151.22-Euro ($170) Phoscon Gateway and 33.57-Euro ($38) ConBee II USB dongle are compatible with “almost all known manufacturers of commercial and DIY Zigbee devices, such as Philips Hue, IKEA Tradfri, OSRAM Lightify, Xiaomi Aqara, Innr, XBee Series 2, Trust Zigbee, and Dresden Elektronik’s own FLS ballasts,” says the Dresden, Germany based company.

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Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

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Skrooge 2.19.0 released

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Libreoffice vs Apache OpenOffice: how to choose the right free office suite for you

When it comes to free office software, there are two main choices: LibreOffice and OpenOffice (or, to give it its proper name, Apache OpenOffice). The two are remarkably similar, so how can you choose the right one for you? First, it's worth thinking carefully about whether you need desktop office software at all. Provided you have an internet connection, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides might offer everything you need, without the need to install anything, and with the extra bonus that everything you create will be automatically saved to the cloud. No more lost documents, or having to email work to yourself. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Plop Linux 19.1 released
  • How do you say SUSE?
    SUSECON 2019 has come and gone and was definitely one for the books. Whether you were able to attend the event in person or not, you can still view plenty of videos and content that was shared at the event. One of my favorite videos from the week was “How do you say SUSE” -which comically reminded attendees how to properly say “SUSE.” Don’t quite know exactly how to pronounce SUSE? We’ve got you covered….Broadway musical style. The keynote videos from each day are not to be missed as well as the series of amazing music parody videos that have recently been created. One of the major take-a-ways this year was the recent announcement that as of March 15, not only did SUSE become an independent company, we are now the largest independent open source company in the industry.
  • In 2019, Most Linux Distributions Still Aren't Restricting Dmesg Access
    Going back to the late Linux 2.6 kernel days has been the CONFIG_DMESG_RESTRICT (or for the past number of years, renamed to CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT) Kconfig option to restrict access to dmesg in the name of security and not allowing unprivileged users from accessing this system log. While it's been brought up from time to time, Linux distributions are still generally allowing any user access to dmesg even though it may contain information that could help bad actors exploit the system. The primary motivation of CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT and an associated sysctl tunable as well (dmesg_restrict) is for restricting access to dmesg so unprivileged users can't see the syslog to avoid possible kernel memory address exposures among other potentially sensitive information that could be leaked about the kernel to help anyone trying to exploit the system. But even with these options being available for years, most Linux distributions leave dmesg open to any user.
  • Is Email Making Professors Stupid?
     

    I can think of at least three strong arguments for why higher education should be that industry, significantly restructuring its work culture to provide professors more uninterrupted time for thinking and teaching, and require less time on email and administrative duties.

  • What is ZIL anyway?
     

    The Infocom ZIL code dump has kicked off a small whirlwind of news articles and blog posts. A lot of them are somewhat hazy on what ZIL is, and how it relates to MDL, Lisp, Z-code, Inform, and the rest of the Golden-Age IF ecosystem.

    So I'm going to talk a lot about it! With examples. But let's go through in chronological order.

  • Death by PowerPoint: the slide that killed seven people

    Edward Tufte’s full report makes for fascinating reading. Since being released in 1987 PowerPoint has grown exponentially to the point where it is now estimated than thirty million PowerPoint presentations are made every day. Yet, PowerPoint is blamed by academics for killing critical thought. Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos has banned it from meetings. Typing text on a screen and reading it out loud does not count as teaching. An audience reading text off the screen does not count as learning. Imagine if the engineers had put up a slide with just: “foam strike more than 600 times bigger than test data.” Maybe NASA would have listened. Maybe they wouldn’t have attempted re-entry. Next time you’re asked to give a talk remember Columbia. Don’t just jump to your laptop and write out slides of text. Think about your message. Don’t let that message be lost amongst text. Death by PowerPoint is a real thing. Sometimes literally.