Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux 5.4 Set To Remove Intel XScale IOP33X/IOP13XX CPU Support

    Linux 5.4 is set to remove the Intel IOP33X and IOP13XX series of processors that are part of the company's former XScale product line for ARM-based CPUs. 

    The XScale IOP processors were intended for handling I/O offloading from the main device CPU. These sub-1.2GHz processors were part of Intel's ARMv8.5-based XScale product portfolio. But with no apparent users of the Intel IOP33X/IOP13XX hardware left -- at least anyone that would likely be riding new Linux kernel releases -- that support is going to be removed later this year with the Linux 5.4 release. 

  • Type 2 customers can now update to Skylake and Kaby Lake

    Adlink has released two Linux-ready COM Express Basic Type 2 modules for legacy customers: The Express-SL2 offers Intel 6th Gen and the Express-KL2 features 7th Gen processors.

    Back in 2014, Adlink launched a pair of COM Express Type 2 drop-in replacement modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core (Express-HL2) and Bay Trail Atom (cExpress-BT2). We had thought that might be the end of Type 2 replacement products. Yet, there are still many customers that are not ready to move to the identically sized (125 x 95mm) Basic Type 6. As a result, Adlink is back with the 6th Gen Skylake Express-SL2 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake Express-KL2 to keep legacy Type 2 customers up to date “for at least another 10 years,” says the company.

  • Wear Estimation for Devices with eMMC Flash Memory

Open Hardware and ARM

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

    Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.

    For this article, I contacted Håvard Skrödahl, founder of Muffsy. His hobby is designing open source audio hardware, and he offers his designs as kits for those of us who can't wait to wind up the soldering iron for another adventure.

    I've built two of Håvard's kits: a moving coil (MC) cartridge preamp and a moving magnet (MM) cartridge phono preamp. Both were a lot of fun to build and sound great. They were also a bit of a stroll down memory lane for me. In my 20s, I built some other audio kits, including a Hafler DH-200 power amplifier and a DH-110 preamplifier. Before that, I built a power amplifier using a Motorola circuit design; both the design and the amplifier were lost along the way, but they were a lot of fun!

  • Nuvoton Launches Brand New M261/M262/M263 Series MCUs for IoT Applications

    Low power and robust security are two major requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) applications. In terms of low power consumption, NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series provides multiple power modes for different operating scenarios, integrating RTC with independent VBAT to support low power mode. The power consumption in normal run mode is 97 μA/MHz (LDO mode) and 45 μA/MHz (DC-DC mode). Standby power-down current is down to 2.8 μA and Deep power-down current is less than 2 μA. The low power, low supply voltage, and fast wake-up (9 μs from Fast-wakeup Power-down mode) features make M261/M262/M263 series suitable for battery-powered IoT applications.

    The robust security functions of NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series include secure boot function to ensure that a device boots using only trusted software through a series of digital signature authentication processes. The M261/M262/M263 series integrates complete hardware crypto engines such as AES 256/192/128, DES/3-DES, SHA, ECC, and True Random Number Generator (TRNG). Furthermore, it provides 4-region programable eXecute-Only-Memory (XOM) to secure critical program codes and up to six tamper detection pins against outer physical attack, which significantly improves the product security.

    [...]

    Third-Party IDEs such as Keil MDK, IAR EWARM, and NuEclipse IDE with GNU GCC compilers are also supported.

  • Arm, WDC and Qualcomm Announce OpenChain Conformance Activities

    Arm and Western Digital Corporation, Platinum Members of the OpenChain Project and key participants in the global supply chain, today announce conformance with the OpenChain Specification. Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., Platinum Member and founding contributor of the OpenChain Project, today announces expanded conformance to the latest version of the OpenChain Specification.

    The OpenChain Project establishes trust in the open source from which software solutions are built. It accomplishes this by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. The OpenChain Specification defines inflection points in business workflows where a compliance process, policy or training should exist to minimize the potential for errors and maximize the efficiency of bringing solutions to market. The companies involved in the OpenChain community number in the hundreds. The OpenChain Specification is being prepared for submission to ISO and evolution from a growing de facto standard into a formal standard.

ClockworkPi Rolls Out GameShell, A DIY Kit To Build Your Own Modular Console

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

ClockworkPI is providing tech enthusiasts the opportunity to build their own modular console with the GameShell.

The gadget is the result of the Kickstarter launched in April 2018. The campaign raised a total of $290,429 or almost six times the original goal of $50,000. Nearly 3,000 people pledged money for the company to push through with the project.

The gadget was billed to be the first mobile and modular game console using an open-source GNU/Linux system. After building the kit, you can play thousands of retro games from major publishers like Atari, SNES, NES, GBA, and GB.

Read more

CutiePi Open Source Tablet uses Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The announcement of the CutiePi, an open source tablet-based on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 comes a bit late for the Pi-based tablet/laptop space.

Read more

PiVoyager is a UPS for the Raspberry Pi With a Real-Time Calendar Clock

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi is a powerful SBC (Single Board Computer), and aside from being used for everyday computing stuff, the Raspberry Pi can be embedded as the brain of various projects.

Read more

Devices: Commell SBC, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Teensy and Linaro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

AMD and Intel: RdRand and Clear Linux Documentation

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Bulldozer/Jaguar CPUs Will No Longer Advertise RdRand Support Under Linux

    Not directly related to the recent AMD Zen 2 BIOS update needed to fix an RdRand problem (though somewhat related in that the original systemd bug report for faulty AMD RdRand stems from these earlier CPUs), but AMD has now decided to no longer advertise RdRand support for Family 15h (Bulldozer) and Family 16h (Jaguar) processors under Linux.

    The RdRand instruction will still work on capable CPUs, but the CPU ID bit is being cleared so that it won't be advertised for software explicitly checking for the support. Tom Lendacky of AMD reesorted to clearing the RDRAND CPU ID bit for 15h/16h processors (no impact for Zen, etc) due to RdRand issues cropping up after suspend/resume. Those issues have affected some users for a while and originate with the original AMD RdRand systemd bug report over problems following that cycle.

  • Clear Linux Project has a new documentation site

    The Clear Linux OS Docs team is happy to announce that our documentation site for the Clear Linux Project has moved to a Sphinx/reST site with the ubiquitous Read-The-Docs theme, consistent with many open source documentation projects.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out Revamped Documentation

    While Arch Linux remains the gold standard for quality Linux documentation, Intel's Clear Linux has rolled out a new documentation web-site to assist new/existing users in making use of this performance-optimized and security-oriented Linux operating system.

Linux on Devices: Aitech Defense Systems and Kontron

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Proven Linux OS Expanded to Aitech's Multi-core Remote I/O Subsystem

    Chatsworth, Calif. July 2019 - Aitech Defense Systems, Inc., a part of the Aitech Group, has ported the cost-effective, open source Linux operating system onto its intelligent Ai-RIO remote I/O interface unit (RIU). This modular small form factor (SFF) RIU internally networks up to eight expansion modules - or 'slices' - for extremely high density and low power in a compact physical space.

  • Tiny Type 10 module serves up Apollo Lake with 16GB DDR4

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, COM Express Mini Type 10 form-factor “COMe-m4AL10” and “COMe-m4AL10 (E2)” modules are built around Apollo Lake SoCs and offer up to 16GB DDR4 and 64GB eMMC with up to -40 to 85°C (E2) support.

    Kontron announced two 84 x 55mm, Intel Apollo Lake based compute modules with 16GB DDR4. The Atom-powered, -40 to 85°C ready COMe-m4AL10 (E2) and Pentium and Celeron equipped, 0 to 60°C COMe-m4AL10 both support up to twice the RAM of the previous (circa-2017) industrial temp COMe-mAL10 (E2) and commercial COMe-mAL10 modules, which use DDR3L RAM.

Best Chromebook laptops for school

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Security

You might think a Chromebook is limited because it can only run programs when it's online. That's not true. For example, you can still work with Google Docs when you're offline.

Also, you can now run many Android apps on Chromebooks. And, these days you can run a full Linux desktop on your new Intel-based Chromebook. Indeed, as my tech buddy Mike Elgan points out, today's high-end Chromebook laptops "run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebook laptops can run apps from Android, Linux, and Windows concurrently in the same session."

In addition, as FutureSource points out, when it comes to school work, Chromebook laptops combine "affordable devices, productivity tools via G-Suite, easy integration with third-party platforms/tools, task management/distribution via Google Classroom, and easy device management remains extremely popular with US teachers and IT buyers alike."

One unsung advantage of Chromebook laptops is that, if your dog ate the Chromebook, you wouldn't have lost your work. All you need do is get another one, log on, and you're back in business with all your e-mail, documents, and calendars intact and ready to go. Another sweet deal that comes when you buy a Chromebook is that you can get 100GB of free Google One cloud storage for a year. That's more than enough room for your homework.

And, since it's easy to erase a Chromebook and then reset it to your account, this is safer than using a used Windows laptop.

Read more

Linux-driven i.MX6 gateway offers 4G plus isolated serial and CANBus

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Forlinx announced a compact “FCU1201” IoT gateway that runs Linux on an i.MX6 DualLite and offers 4G, WiFi/BT, LAN, CAN, HDMI, USB, serial, DIDO, and CANBus.

Chinese embedded vendor Forlinx has unveiled a power-efficient FCU1201 IoT gateway equipped with NXP’s 1GHz, dual-core Cortex-A9 i.MX6 DualLite. Like the company’s i.MX6 UL-equipped FCU1101, the system combines extensive serial interfaces with wireless connectivity.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 8.6.0 Public Release

Version 8.6 basiert auf → Debian/stable (buster), mit einzelnen Paketen aus Debian/testing und unstable (sid) (v.a. Grafiktreiber und aktuelle Productivity-Software) und verwendet → Linux Kernel 5.2.5 sowie Xorg 7.7 (core 1.20.4) zur Unterstützung aktueller Computer-Hardware. Read more English: Knoppix 8.6 new public version is finally out !

Linux 5.3 Kernel Yielding The Best Performance Yet For AMD EPYC "Rome" CPU Performance

Among many different Linux/open-source benchmarks being worked on for the AMD EPYC "Rome" processors now that our initial launch benchmarks are out of the way are Linux distribution comparisons, checking out the BSD compatibility, and more. Some tests I wrapped up this weekend were seeing how recent Linux kernel releases perform on the AMD EPYC 7742 64-core / 128-thread processors. For some weekend analysis, here are benchmarks of Linux 4.18 through Linux 5.3 in its current development form. All tests were done on the same AMD EPYC 7742 2P server running Ubuntu 19.04 and using the latest kernels in each series via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. Read more

Fedora 29 to 30 upgrade - How it went

Alas, my Fedora 30 experience started strong with the first review and soured since. The test on the old laptop with Nvidia graphics highlighted numerous problems, including almost ending up in an unbootable state due to the wrong driver version being selected by the software center. With the in-vivo upgrade, I almost ended up in a similar state due to some incompatibility with extensions. I wasn't pleased by other glitches and errors, and the performance improvement margin isn't as stellar as the clean install test. All in all, Fedora 30 feels like a rather buggy release, with tons of problems. I think versions 27 to 29 were quite robust overall, at least the Gnome version, but the latest edition is quite rough. That would mean I'd advise people upgrading to take care of their data, remember the possible snags like extensions, and triple check their hardware is up to the task, because apparently QA isn't cool anymore, and no one else will do this for you. All in all, Fedora 30 is very bleeding edge, finicky, definitely not for everyday use by ordinary desktop folks. It's a dev tool for devs, so if you want something stable and boring, search elsewhere. Read more

Neptune 6.0 Released, Which is based on Debian 10 (Buster)

Leszek has pleased to announce the release of the new stable release of Neptune 6.0 on 1th Aug, 2019. It’s first stable release of Neptune 6.0 based on Debian 10 “Buster”, featuring the KDE Plasma desktop with the typical Neptune tweaks and configurations. The base of the system is Linux Kernel in version 4.19.37 which provides the necessary hardware support. Plasma 5.14.5 features the stable and flexible KDE made desktop that is loved by millions. Read more