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How to Install Java 17 in Ubuntu 20.04, 21.10, Linux Mint 20

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Linux
HowTos

A quick guide on how to install the latest Java 17 in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10 and Linux Mint 20.x.
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5 Reasons Purism's Librem Laptops Are More Secure Than Your Notebook

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GNU
Linux

If you're looking for a secure laptop computer, you have several options. Thumb readers, facial recognition, and built-in encryption all offer considerable security. But these features – typically backed up by the operating system – are prone to failure, one way or another. For example, facial recognition can be bypassed using various techniques.

Purism is a company that assembles Linux computers, complete with a secure operating system and hardware kill switches. These features – while eschewing potential points of entry found on other laptops – make Purism laptops particularly attractive to any user concerned about online privacy and security.

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Kernel: Graphics and Linux M1 Support

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD + Valve Focusing On P-State / CPPC Driver With Schedutil For Better Linux Efficiency - Phoronix

    As reported at the start of August, AMD and Valve have been working on Linux CPU performance/frequency scaling improvements with the Steam Deck being one of the leading motivators. As speculated at that time, their work would likely revolve around use of ACPI CPPC found with Zen 2 CPUs and newer. Published last week was that AMD P-State driver for Linux systems indeed now leveraging CPPC information. AMD formally presented this new driver yesterday at XDC2021.

  • DRM Driver Posted For AI Processing Unit - Initially Focused On Mediatek SoCs - Phoronix

    BayLibre developer Alexandre Bailon has posted a "request for comments" of a new open-source Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for AI Processing Unit (APU) functionality. Initially the driver is catering to Mediatek SoCs with an AI co-processor but this DRM "APU" driver could be adapted to other hardware too.

    Alexandre Bailon sums up this DRM AI Processing Unit driver as "a DRM driver that implements communication between the CPU and an APU. This uses VirtIO buffer to exchange messages. For the data, we allocate a GEM object and map it using IOMMU to make it available to the APU. The driver is relatively generic, and should work with any SoC implementing hardware accelerator for AI if they use support remoteproc and VirtIO."

  • Apple M1 USB Type-C Linux Support Code Sent Out For Testing - Phoronix

    he latest patches sent out for review/testing on the long mission for enabling Apple M1 support on Linux is the USB Type-C connectivity.

    Sven Peter has sent out the initial USB Type-C enablement work for the Apple ACE1/2 chips used by Apple M1 systems. In turn this Apple design is based on the TI TPS6598x IP but various differences. The Linux kernel support is being added onto the existing TIPD driver.

Audiocasts/Videos: GNU World Order, Sioyek, LUTs

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Stable Kernels: 5.14.6, 5.13.19, and 5.10.67

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.6 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 5.13.19

Linux 5.10.67

Missing Standard Apps on elementary OS and Guide To Install Them

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

elementary OS is a fast replacement to Windows or macOS. It comes with basic apps you need without ones you don't. Because of that, several standard apps like LibreOffice not included by default. This article presents you the apps and guide to install them to help you every time you have new elementary OS. We hope this would be useful to you!

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Kernel: Intel Being Intel and Linux Plumbers Conference

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Linux
  • Intel Alder Lake has a special treat for Windows 11 users, but Linux may be left in the lurch [Ed: Intel continues to prop up Microsoft's monopoly while ruining things for Linux (all the time, e.g. [1, 2])]
  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Get ready for LPC 2021!

    The LPC 2021 conference is just around the corner. We wanted to share the logistics on how to participate and watch the virtual conference.

    For those that are not registered for the conference, we will have live streaming of the sessions on YouTube, like last year. This is free of charge. We will provide the URLs where to watch each day, on this page. The only limitation is that you cannot participate and ask questions live with audio. However this year we will have the chat in each Big Blue Button room also available externally via the Matrix open communication network. Anyone is invited to join with their personal Matrix account.

Why my public library chooses Linux and open source

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

The Crawford County Federated Library System has been using Linux and open source software in its IT operations since 1999. They realized early on the potential of open source and integrated it into their enterprise. They were a part of my own Linux journey as I built a content filtering system for our school district. Twenty years ago, there were few models for the use of open source in libraries and education. Meadville Public Library and the Crawford County Federated Library System were the leaders then and now. Recently I had some questions about how to help libraries in our own library system, and I called Meadville. They referred me to Cindy Murdock Ames, their IT Director. I asked her what they were using for patron desktop computers. Cindy sent a brief email that piqued my interest, and I asked her if she would agree to an email interview. She graciously accepted.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

2021 Is the Year of Linux on the Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's the year of Linux on the desktop! Thirty years into the life of Linux, it seems like people have said that every year. But now it's really true, and it's true because Linux found its real niche—not as a political statement about "free software," but as a practical way to enable capable, low-cost machines for millions.

Linux was founded on the desktop, as one man's project to create an alternative OS for his Intel-based PC. So it's understandable that Linux fans have been focused on desktops and laptops as a sign of success—and not, say, servers, or IoT, or drones. They can finally rest easy. Walk into any school now, and you'll see millions of Linux machines. They're called Chromebooks.

Chrome OS and Android are both based on the Linux kernel. They don't have the extra GNU software that distributions like Ubuntu have, but they're descended from Linus Torvalds' original work. Chromebooks are the fastest growing segment of the traditional PC market, according to Canalys. IDC points out that Canalys' estimates of 12 million Chromebooks shipped in Q1 2021 are only a fraction of the 63 million notebooks sold that quarter, but once again, they're where the growth is. Much of that is driven by schools, where Chromebooks dominate now.

Schoolkids don't generally need a million apps' worth of generic computing power. They need inexpensive, rugged ways to log into Google Classroom. Linux came to the rescue, enabling cheap, light, easy-to-manage PCs that don't have the Swiss Army Knife cruft of Windows or the premium price of Macs.

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Also: Someone Made Ubuntu Look Just Like Windows 11

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More in Tux Machines

What To Do After Installing elementary OS 6

This is a recommendation for new elementary OS users who just had version 6 codenamed Odin. It includes apps, settings, and some enhancements you would and might need. Enjoy elementary OS experience! There are work apps not included in elementary OS which we need to install ourselves for example LibreOffice, multimedia tools like Kdenlive, and games like TuxMath and 0 A.D. Follow this guide to get what you need: Guide to Install 20 Standard Apps on elementary OS. Read more

5 best practices for using open source community leaderboards

It takes a community of people with varying skill sets and expertise to build open source software. Leaderboards have become a way for open source communities to track progress and showcase and celebrate top-performing contributors. If leaderboards are done right, they can increase participation, motivate contributors with gamification, and enhance the community. But leaderboards can also have adverse outcomes—including discouraging participation. The Community Health Analytics Open Source Software (CHAOSS) community, a Linux Foundation project, focuses on bringing standardization to open source project health and metrics. Leaderboards are a topic that keeps coming up during those conversations. Initially, this blog post was a presentation I made for Upstream 2021, the Tidelift event that kicked off Maintainer Week, a weeklong celebration of open source maintainers. This article will explore five best practices to help communities use leaderboards successfully and improve their project health through metrics. Read more

How to Install Java 17 in Ubuntu 20.04, 21.10, Linux Mint 20

A quick guide on how to install the latest Java 17 in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10 and Linux Mint 20.x. Read more

Rufus for linux? Not available, Use these best alternatives

Rufus for Linux, yes, everybody who has ever used this bootable USB creator tool which is only available for Windows, definitely wished to have it for Linux operating systems too. However, although it is not directly available for Linux, we can still use it with the help of Wine software. But again even after installing it using Wine on Ubuntu, in our case, it couldn’t recognize the attached USB drives, which again closed the door for normal users to use Rufus on Linux. Thus in such scenarios what do? Don’t worry. The Rufus is not the only software for creating a bootable USB drives in the world. There are also few other best alternatives to Rufus that we can use easily on Linux operating systems. And here today we will discuss such opensource or free tools for creating bootable drives on Linux Distros. Read more