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Linux Foundation and Intel: Confidential Computing Consortium, OpenGL 4.6 Support For Mesa 19.2 and More

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Linux
Hardware
  • New Cross-Industry Effort to Advance Computational Trust and Security for Next-Generation Cloud and Edge Computing

    The Linux Foundation today announced the intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium, a community dedicated to defining and accelerating the adoption of confidential computing. Companies committed to this work include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

    Across industries computing is moving to span multiple environments, from on premises to public cloud to edge. As companies move these workloads to different environments, they need protection controls for sensitive IP and workload data and are increasingly seeking greater assurances and more transparency of these controls. Current approaches in cloud computing address data at rest and in transit but encrypting data in use is considered the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data. Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.

  • The Linux Foundation, Intel & Co Form The Confidential Computing Consortium

    In kicking off the Open Source Summit that has returned to San Diego, the Linux Foundation has announced the formation of the Confidential Computing Consortium in collaboration with Intel and other companies.

    The initial batch of companies forming the Confidential Computing Consortium include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent. This consortium will focus on providing greater transparency and control over user data, reduce exposure to sensitive data, and other protections by means of open-source tooling and hardware advancements around trusted execution environments.

  • Intel's OpenGL Linux Driver Now Has OpenGL 4.6 Support For Mesa 19.2

    Two years after the OpenGL 4.6 specification was announced, Intel's open-source OpenGL Linux driver is now officially advertising the support after today landing the remaining SPIR-V enablement work.

    For the better part of the past two years the Intel OpenGL Linux drivers were held up from having GL 4.6 due to the ARB_gl_spirv / ARB_spirv_extensions extensions for better interoperability with Vulkan. But today those extensions are now crossed off the list and OpenGL 4.6 is finally in Mesa core with Intel's i965/Iris drivers being the first.

  • Intel Launches 10th Gen "Comet Lake" Laptop CPUs For Laptops & 2-in-1s

    Earlier this month Intel announced 11 Icelake CPUs for laptops and 2-in1s under their 10th Gen CPU line-up. Today the company announced the 10th Gen Comet Lake CPUs also for 2-in-1s and laptops.

Customizable compute module and eval kit run Linux on i.MX8X

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Linux

CompuLab’s rugged “CL-SOM-iMX8X” module runs Linux on a quad -A35 i.MX8X and offers up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, up to 2x GbE, and optional 802.11ac/BT 4.2. There’s also a $395 eval kit.

CompuLab, which has previously launched NXP i.MX8M-based CL-SOM-iMX8 and i.MX8M Mini based UCM-iMX8M-Mini modules, has now returned with a module that supports the i.MX8X. Like the CL-SOM-iMX8, the new CL-SOM-iMX8X is a SODIMM-style module. It’s designed for industrial HMI, building control, image processing systems, IoT gateways, medical devices, and metering systems.

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7 Great Linux Statistical Analysis Tools

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GNU
Linux
Software
Sci/Tech

Science is the effort of seeking to comprehend how the physical world works. From observation and experimentation, science uses physical evidence of natural phenomena to compile data and analyze the collated information.

In modern research it is essential for scientists to keep abreast of the latest statistical software. Just like the fast moving world of research, developments in statistical software and methods continue to abound. Making full use of the improvements in computer software helps to advance the pace of research.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released in a freely distributable environment.

Linux is particularly strong in the field of open source statistical software. The purpose of this article is to identify software for performing statistical analysis. This type of software helps to summarize data in a shorter form, and helps scientists understand a concept or representation and make possible predictions based on this understanding.

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Runtu XFCE 18.04.3 Released, Which is Based on Ubuntu Bionic Beaver 18.04.3 LTS

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Hsh has announced the release of Runtu 18.04.3, it’s third maintenance update of Runtu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS, which is based on the package release base of Bionic Beaver 18.04.3 LTS.

It features full support of Russian localization and a set of pre-installed software, which make sure you to run the system smoothly.

Also, backported few of the packages from Ubuntu 19.04 for better improvements.

It’s backported Linux kernel version 5.0 and the graphics stack components, and the package database.

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Librem 5 August Update

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
Gadgets

We are preparing everything for the Librem 5 to be delivered soon, and its software will focus on the most critical applications a phone needs: calls, messages and web browsing. There are supporting projects that will be delivered too, like GNOME Settings, the shell, GNOME Initial Setup, and GNOME Contacts. So without further ado, let’s take a tour through the software we will deliver–as well as some other applications that have seen some major changes.

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low-memory-monitor: new project announcement

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

I'll soon be flying to Greece for GUADEC but wanted to mention one of the things I worked on the past couple of weeks: the low-memory-monitor project is off the ground, though not production-ready.

low-memory-monitor, as its name implies, monitors the amount of free physical memory on the system and will shoot off signals to interested user-space applications, usually session managers, or sandboxing helpers, when that memory runs low, making it possible for applications to shrink their memory footprints before it's too late either to recover a usable system, or avoid taking a performance hit.

It's similar to Android's lowmemorykiller daemon, Facebook's oomd, Endless' psi-monitor, amongst others

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Also: New Low-Memory-Monitor Project Can Help With Linux's RAM/Responsiveness Problem

Latest Debian GNU/Linux Security Patch Addresses 14 Vulnerabilities, Update Now

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Linux
Security

Available for the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" and Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update addresses a total of 14 vulnerabilities discovered by various security researchers. The Debian Project urges all users to update their installations as soon as possible.

Among the security flaws patched, we can mention a race condition in the libsas subsystem that supports Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) devices, a potential double-free in the block subsystem, as well as two issues that could make it easier for attackers to exploit other vulnerabilities.

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Xfce 4.14 released! (Yeah, like a week ago ;))

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Why is the release manager late to the party with his blog post? The explanation is simple: We prioritized sticking to the schedule and getting our releases out to everyone as planned, as our codebase was ready. What was not (entirely) ready was some parts of the website, which were brought up-to-date over the course of last week.

So I’m pleased to give you the official Xfce 4.14 tour, which nicely summarizes many of the nice user-facing changes that we pushed into the release (despite it being planned as feature-less, porting-only).

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Also: Xfce 4.16 Should Be Out Next Year But Without GTK4 Or Wayland

6 Best Linux Distros for Laptops

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Linux

Whether buying a Linux pre-installed laptop or selecting a Linux distro for your existing laptop, there are many things to consider. Let's take you through some of the best Linux distros that are optimized for Laptops in this 2019 edition of the article. Read on.

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Redcore Linux 1908 Released, Which Fixes Many of the Pending Bugs

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Redcore Linux developer has released the new version of Redcore Linux 1908 and code name is Mira.

This release fixes most of the outstanding bugs and some more polishing. Also, added new features as well.

Bunch of packages (1000+) got updated because this release is based on Gentoo’s testing branch, unlike previous releases which were based on a mix of Gentoo’s stable and testing branches.

Starting from Redcore Linux 1908, the packages shold be up-to-date since it’s using Gentoo’s testing branch.

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Customizable compute module and eval kit run Linux on i.MX8X

CompuLab’s rugged “CL-SOM-iMX8X” module runs Linux on a quad -A35 i.MX8X and offers up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, up to 2x GbE, and optional 802.11ac/BT 4.2. There’s also a $395 eval kit. CompuLab, which has previously launched NXP i.MX8M-based CL-SOM-iMX8 and i.MX8M Mini based UCM-iMX8M-Mini modules, has now returned with a module that supports the i.MX8X. Like the CL-SOM-iMX8, the new CL-SOM-iMX8X is a SODIMM-style module. It’s designed for industrial HMI, building control, image processing systems, IoT gateways, medical devices, and metering systems. Read more

today's howtos

Announcing notqmail

Okay, that’s not entirely true. While qmail hasn’t been updated by its original author, a group of respected users created netqmail, a series of tiny updates that were informed, conservative, and careful. By their design, it was safe for everyone running qmail to follow netqmail, so everyone did. But larger changes in the world of email — authentication, encryption, and ever-shifting anti-spam techniques — remained as puzzles for each qmail administrator to solve in their own way. And netqmail hasn’t been updated since 2007. Read more Also: Announcing notqmail