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Gaming

How to set up Fedora Silverblue as a gaming station

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Red Hat
Gaming
HowTos

This process starts with a clean Fedora 29 Silverblue installation with a user already created for you.

First, go to https://flathub.org/home and enable the Flathub repository on your system. To do this, click the Quick setup button on the main page.

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Gaming: DeviluitionX, Walmart, Stadia, Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, Baba Is You, Epic, We. The Revolution and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • DeviluitionX: Enjoying The 23 Year Old Diablo Game Atop An Open-Source Engine

    The latest open-source game engine project working to re-implement a legendary commercial game is DeviluitionX. This new effort is an open-source re-implementation of Blizzard's Diablo game from 1996 while now working on Linux and other operating systems nicely.

    The DeviluitionX effort has already reached "a fully playable state on Linux / macOS / Windows, with only minor issues remaining." DeviluitionX does require the game assets from the official Diablo release, which is now available easily from GOG.com following the recent Diablo release on that DRM-free platform.

  • Walmart Is Planning Its Own Gaming Streaming Service: Report

    Google recently entered the $140 billion gaming industry by launching Stadia, a cloud-gaming service. The company garnered a lot of attention from tech enthusiasts as it showcased the service that supports 4K resolutions and gaming at 60fps.

  • Exclusive: Walmart is Talking to Developers and Publishers About a Potential Streaming Service

    Google made headlines this week when it announced its arrival into the video game space with a new streaming venture called Stadia. But according to sources, another major corporation is investigating the video game streaming business too, and it's none other than Walmart.

    Multiple sources familiar with Walmart's plans, who wish to remain anonymous, confirmed to USG that the retail giant is exploring its own platform to enter in the now-competitive video game streaming race. No other details were revealed other than it will be a streaming service for video games, and that Walmart has been speaking with developers and publishers since earlier this year and throughout this year's Game Developers Conference.

  • Google Has Killed 147 Projects, Will Stadia Join Them?
  • In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux

    One Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform.

    Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes.

  • Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts

    Baba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within.

    Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall.

  • Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use

    Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon".

  • We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now

    Set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support.

    As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Update: Now actually live on GOG too.

  • 2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer

    One thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good.

    Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off.

  • CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio

    For those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product.

Announcing CrossOver 18.5.0 and Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Announcing CrossOver 18.5.0

    CrossOver 18.5 includes the FAudio library to provide superior audio support for games. FAudio is a reimplementation of XAudio2, a low-level audio library for Windows. This improvement broadens CrossOver’s game compatibility and resolves a wide variety of audio bugs on both macOS and Linux.

    CrossOver 18.5 resolves several Office 2010 bugs related to activation and licensing. The first involves a change which disrupted the activation status of Office 2010 bottles upgraded from CrossOver 17.x and earlier to CrossOver 18.x. Users who experienced persistent activation requests on earlier releases of CrossOver 18 should be able to successfully activate Office 2010 on CrossOver 18.5. We have also resolved a bug which caused Office 2010 to attempt and fail configuration on every launch for some users.

    On Linux, CrossOver 18.5 supports the very latest release of Office 365 and resolves a sign-in bug impacting Office 365 Home users.

    Finally, CrossOver 18.5 includes preliminary support for OneNote 2016 on Linux.

  • CrossOver 18.5 Released - Based On Wine 4.0 While Pulling In FAudio

    CodeWeavers, the main sponsor/contributor to the Wine project, announced the release today of their commercial CrossOver 18.5 software for more easily running Windows games and applications on Linux and macOS.

  • The GOG Spring Sale is now live, tons of titles discounted with flash deals each day

    Someone please lock away my wallet, as the GOG Spring Sale is live and it's full of discounted Linux games.

    For this huge sale, GOG are also doing Flash Deals so every 24 hours a couple of games will get a higher than usual discount so you will need to keep going back for the best.

  • Valve show off their new Steam Library design and a new Events page

    At GDC today, Valve did their presentation and they finally showed off the new design coming for the Library page and more.

    For those with a growing backlog of games, the Steam Library as it is right now is so basic it's just incredibly unhelpful. Going by what they've shown off, it's actually looking a serious amount better. Firstly, it has a home page for your Steam Library, to go over some recent games and recently updated titles, as well as show a slice of your friends list. That's a pretty handy feature, especially if you have a game you play regularly enough it will probably be quicker and easier to get going the next time.

  • You can now try XCOM 2 free until March 25th, also on a big sale

    Firaxis Games have put their strategy game XCOM 2 up to play for free between now and March 25th, so if you've been on the fence this is a great opportunity.

    It's quite easily my absolute favourite strategy game on Linux, much more interesting than the first of the newer XCOM games (although that's still damn fun too). It does have a few niggles and some performance issues here and there but that's not down to Feral Interactive's port as it's not much different on Windows.

  • Humble Store are giving away Tacoma during their Indie Mega Week sale

    Humble Store has another free game from you to grab with Tacoma, along with their Indie Mega Week sale now live.

    I enjoyed my Tacoma play-through, done in a single sitting and I think it's worth grabbing and actually playing. You can see my previous thoughts here. You can grab your free copy here, which requires subbing to their newsletter.

Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

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Gaming
  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions

    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband.

    Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off.

    Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:

  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5

    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS.

    Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.

  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play

    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.

  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG

    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.

  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety

    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now.

    While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone

    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole.

    Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

Games: SteamOS, Oxygen Not Included, Kingdom Rush Origins, Stadia and WineVulkan

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamOS is alive with a new beta and updated drivers, also a new Steam Client Beta is out

    Valve haven't given up on their home-grown Linux distribution yet, with SteamOS seeing another beta update. Additionally, there's another Steam Client Beta update about.

    As far as updates to SteamOS go, the last time they actually announced anything was with the 2.170 update back in January but they have actually been doing multiple newer builds since then you can see here. Just today, they officially announced the SteamOS 2.183 beta and the gist of it is this...

  • Oxygen Not Included from Klei Entertainment to leave Early Access in May with new content

    Oxygen Not Included, the incredible space-colony sim from Klei Entertainment is leaving Early Access in May and they've detailed some of what's coming and future plans.

    Before I get started, I just want to mention how much I love Oxygen Not Included. It fills me with wonder as much as it charges me with rage at times, especially when all my people are sick and throwing up everywhere or urinating in our clean water. It has a fantastic style to it too, although Klei games always look good (Don't Starve being another example of this). It's quite amusing to rename your people too, makes it quite hilarious when someone you know well goes around wrecking the place. Every game is a new challenge, every cavern you dig into might have something awesome and it's just good fun.

  • Kingdom Rush Origins expanded again recently, the Forgotten treasures expansion is out

    Kingdom Rush Origins, the excellent tower defense game from Ironhide Game Studio is seeing some great updates, with another campaign named Forgotten treasures now up.

  • Google Announces Stadia Cloud Gaming Service Powered by Linux and Vulkan

    Google announced today during the GDC (Game Developers Conference) 2019 conference a new cloud-based video game streaming platform called Stadia.
    With Stadia, Google aims to take on Nvidia's GeForce NOW and Valve's Steam Link game streaming services by offering users select and original titles developed in-house, as well as instant access to your games library, which you'll be able to stream virtually anywhere in up to 4K HDR resolutions at 60 frames per second.

    "To build Stadia, we’ve thought deeply about what it means to be a gamer and worked to converge two distinct worlds: people who play video games and people who love watching them. Stadia will lift restrictions on the games we create and play—and the communities who enjoy them," said Phil Harrison, Vice President and GM, Google Stadia.

    Stadia promises to be an advanced game streaming powered by Google's globally connected network of data centers that combine server class CPU, GPU, RAM, and storage to deliver 24/7 gaming to players around the world and unlimited resources to game developers who want to create original and gorgeous games.

  • Wine Has Landed The Necessary Patches For Vulkan 1.1 Support

    The "WineVulkan" code within Wine for exposing the Vulkan API to Windows games/applications now supports the requirements to last year's Vulkan 1.1 base specification

Pop OS 18.10 Linux Gaming Report: System76 Nails It For Nvidia And AMD Users

Filed under
OS
Gaming

Pop!_OS is, in my opinion, a seriously underappreciated Ubuntu-based operating that distinguishes itself in a couple major areas -- in addition to its utter simplicity and slick installer. It was created primarily to be the accompanying OS for the variety of custom Linux desktops and laptops produced by System76, and they've added some features I prefer not to live without regardless of what hardware I'm using.

First, Pop!_OS is one of the only distros I've tried that elegantly handles Hybrid graphics (that's Intel CPU + Nvidia GPU as seen in laptops like the ThinkPad X1 Extreme) out of the box. Moreover, System76 ships two versions of Pop!_OS: one designed for Intel/AMD, and one designed for Nvidia GPUs. The Nvidia ISO installs the proprietary driver so that users don't need to add a repository by hand and install it later.

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Some Quick Graphics/Game Tests With GNOME 3.32 On Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME
Gaming

For about one week already Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux distribution has been shipping with GNOME 3.32. Here are some quick graphics and gaming benchmarks comparing GNOME 3.30.2 to 3.32.0.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card, I tested Clear Linux between its releases having GNOME Shell 3.30 and the move to GNOME Shell 3.30.2. On both builds of Clear Linux, Linux 5.0.1 was in use along with X.Org Server 1.20.4 (they aren't yet defaulting to a Wayland session), and Mesa 19.1-devel.

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Games: Stadia, System Shock and Wizard of Legend

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Gaming

Games: More on Stadia, OpenXR, Albion Online

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stadia, A Gaming Platform From Google

    Google has launched much-anticipated game streaming service Stadia. The announcement was made during the company’s keynote at the GDC (Game Developers Conference) in San Francisco.

  • Vulkan 1.1.105 Adds New Extensions For Google Games Platform (Stadia)

    While Vulkan 1.1.104 was just released on Sunday with new extensions ahead of this week's Game Developers Conference, today marks the availability of Vulkan 1.1.105 with new extensions for the "Google Games Platform", a.k.a. their just announced Stadia cloud game streaming platform.

    Google Games Platform is a new Vulkan platform and dubbed GGP. This Vulkan update comes immediately following Google announcing Stadia as a Linux/Vulkan-powered game streaming platform that sounds quite interesting and will be interesting to learn more over the weeks ahead. Today's Vulkan 1.1.105 update has added the VK_GGP_frame_token and VK_GGP_stream_descriptor_surface extensions.

  • OpenXR from The Khronos Group and Monado from Collabora could unify VR & AR

    The Khronos Group recently announced a provisional specification of OpenXR, a royalty-free open-standard aimed at unifying access to VR and AR (collectively known as XR) devices. Also, Collabora announced Monado, a fully open source OpenXR runtime for Linux.

    [...]

    Sounds like OpenXR is already gaining pretty good industry support too with Epic Games, Microsoft, Oculus, HTC, Tobii, Unity and more giving their backing to it. Hopefully this means it really will become a standard that's actually used preventing more fragmentation. Since no one headset has truly taken over just yet, with so many already throwing their support around for OpenXR it's looking pretty good.

  • The MMO Albion Online is officially going free to play next month

    Sandbox Interactive just announced that their MMO Albion Online, which currently requires an initial purchase to access it is going free to play on April 10th.

    They say their business model isn't changing, with Premium accounts that can be purchased with in-game money or real money, as well as cosmetic items. Free accounts will have full access to everything, since they don't lock any actual content behind any walls with this free to play release.

Games: GNU/Linux-powered Stadia, Humble Curve Digital Bundle and More on GNU/Linux-powered Atari VCS

Filed under
Gaming
  • Google announce ‘Stadia’, their new cloud gaming service built on Linux and Vulkan

    Google have now finally unveiled their new cloud gaming service named Stadia, offering instant access to play games in Google Chrome.

    What they joked was the worst-kept secret in the industry (no kidding), sounds like quite an interesting service. Certainly one that could eventually end up redefining what gaming is. A little hyperbolic maybe? I'm not so sure considering how easy this should be to jump into a game. On top of that, they very clearly talked about how it's built on Linux (Debian specifically) and Vulkan with custom GPUs from AMD.

  • Google’s Stadia Is “Netflix For Games” — Play Any Game Without Installation

    everaging the network of its highly efficient and scalable server infrastructure, Google has finally launched its much-anticipated game streaming service called Stadia. The announcement took place at the company’s keynote at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

  • Stadia is Google’s New Gaming Service Powered by Linux & Open-Source Tech

    Stadia, a brand new game streaming service from Google, has been revealed — and it’s powered by open source technology.

    Long rumoured, but only formally announced at Games Developer Conference (GDC) 2019, the cloud gaming service promises to let gamers game from pretty much anywhere they want.

    There’s no Stadia console; no box you buy and hook up to your TV. Instead, games run from a datacenter and are streamed to you via the internet. Games can be streamed at up to 4k at 60fps, depending on your connection, of course.

    So folks, the dream of playing AAA games on Stadia on your crummy downstairs TV; your mid-range Android; or a potato laptop running Linux and Google Chrome, is now real.

  • Stadia Is Google's Cloud Gaming Service Using Linux, Vulkan & A Custom AMD GPU

    Google used the annual Game Developers Conference (GDC 2019) to officially unveil "Stadia" as their cloud-based game streaming service formerly known as Project Stream.

    To little surprise these days, the Google Stadia streaming service is built on Linux servers. Also to not a lot of surprise, Vulkan is their graphics API of choice for streaming right now up to 4K at 60FPS while they plan to expand to 8K at 120FPS in the future.

  • The Humble Curve Digital Bundle is out with four nice Linux games

    Now that the dust has settled on the Google Stadia news, here's something entirely different: the Humble Curve Digital Bundle.

  • Atari VCS Release Delayed – But There’s a Good Reason Why

    Remember the Atari VCS, aka the crowd-funded Linux-based games console that is totally not vapourware and will absolutely be released?

    Well, its release just got delayed.

    Those who backed the (very successful) IndieGoGo campaign won’t receive their units until late 2019 at the earliest. The console had originally planned to ship to backers in the summer of 2019, and go on general sale soon after.

    But although this delay is disappointing development for fans of this particular vintage gaming icon, there is an upside.

    Yup, it turns there is a very good reason for the delay…

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today's leftovers

  • Full Circle Weekly News #125
  • Why Open19 Designs Matter for Edge Computing [Ed: Openwashing Microsoft without even any source code]
    On the opening day of this year's Data Center World in Phoenix, Yuval Bachar, LinkedIn's principal engineer of data center architecture, was on hand to explain why the social network's Open19 Project will be an important part of data centers' move to the edge.
  • Course Review: Applied Hardware Attacks: Rapid Prototying & Hardware Implants
    Everyone learns in different ways. While Joe is happy to provide as much help as a student needs, his general approach probably caters most to those who learn by doing. Lecture is light and most of the learning happens during the lab segments. He gives enough space that you will make mistakes and fail, but not so badly that you never accomplish your objective. If you read the lab manual carefully, you will find adequate hints to get you in the right direction. On the other hand, if you’re a student that wants to site in a classroom and listen to an instructor lecture for the entire time, you are definitely in the wrong place. If you do not work on the labs, you will get very, very, little out of the course. The rapid prototyping course is a good introduction to using the 3D printer and pcb mill for hardware purposes, and would be valuable even for those building hardware instead of breaking it. It really opened my eyes to the possibilities of these technologies. On the other hand, I suspect that the hardware implants course has limited application. It’s useful to learn what is possible, but unless you work in secure hardware design or offensive security that would use hardware implants, it’s probably not something directly applicable to your day to day.
  • Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar
    I’ve written a lot about multimedia software including a wide range of music players, some built with web-technologies, others using popular widget toolkits like Qt and GTK. I want to look at another music player today. You may not have heard of this one, as development stalled for a few years. But it’s still under development, and it offers some interesting features. It’s called Nulloy. The software is written in the C++ programming language, with the user interface using the Qt widget toolkit. It’s first release was back in 2011.
  • A Complete List of Google Drive Clients for Linux