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Gaming

Intel-based Chromebooks and Games

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GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware
Gaming
  • Intel Compute Runtime Update Adds OpenCL + oneAPI Level Zero For DG1

    Intel's open-source Compute Runtime stack for providing OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero support for their graphics hardware has now rolled out support for the DG1 Xe discrete graphics card.

    Building off the DG1 support that has materialized for the Linux kernel and other components, most recently the IGC graphics compiler now supporting DG1, today's release of the Intel Compute Runtime has DG1 support in place.

  • Google testing native Steam client on Chromebooks powered by 10th generation Intel CPUs

    Chrome OS, Google’s other operating system to Android, has evolved very rapidly since the 2016 introduction of the Google Play Store, allowing Chromebooks to download and install Android apps. Google has since introduced support for running native Linux apps under the project name of Crostini. Crostini allows full desktop applications to run on Chromebooks and is based on the Debian Linux distribution. Running Android and Linux apps relies on Chrome OS’ ability to run containerized virtual machines, a means of allowing the core operating system to run different segmented virtual machines in an efficient and secure manner. That’s a fancy way of saying your Chromebook can have multiple personalities, and it’s the same technology underpinning how some Chromebooks will soon be able to run Windows apps. Today’s news is that the team at 9to5Google have identified a new special project in the Chromium open-source code called Borealis. Borealis is a Linux distribution based on popular Ubuntu, and comes complete with Steam already installed:

  • Steam on Chromebooks could be a game changer

    There have been continual developments in the realm of Linux on ChromeOS for some time. There early builds — Crostini — were based on Debian Linux.

    What is very different with the new version “Gerrit” versus the older Crostini builds is that it’s now Ubuntu based vs Debian. This is likely due to the previous iterations of Valve’s Steam for Linux running on Ubuntu.

  • Google could bring Steam gaming to Chromebooks (via Linux)

    Chrome OS is an operating system that was originally designed to support a single app – the Chrome web browser. But in recent years Google has brought support for Android apps and Linux apps to Chromebooks.

    So far that Linux support has come through a feature called Crostini, which is basically a virtual machine that runs Debian Linux in a way that lets you install and run Linux software without leaving Chrome OS.

    But 9to5Google was digging through the source code for Chromium OS (the open source version of Chrome OS) and discovered a new Linux virtual machine called Borealis, which uses Ubuntu rather than Debian. Borealis also includes a pre-installed version of Valve’s Steam game client for Linux.

Games: Humble Choice, Universim and GNOME Games

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Gaming
  • Humble Choice for July is up with Railway Empire, EARTHLOCK and more

    Humble Choice, the monthly curated bundle from Humble Bundle is up with a fresh set of games to pick from and claim to be yours. You pick a tier with different prices to get access to the huge Humble Trove (a collection of DRM-free games) plus a Humble Store discount and then you pick between 3-9 games to keep.

  • The Universim god game gets early-game love, a new explainer trailer plus more

    A city builder that's also a sort-of god game sim and eventually it will also be a multi-planet strategy game? The Universim certainly has a grand plan and a new explainer trailer to help.

    I've written about this one numerous times now, personally supporting it quite early on because it seemed so promising and I absolutely love where they're going with it. Thankfully, one of my pet-peeves has been solved a little and this with the early game seeing some love in the 'Melting Shoe' update out now.

  • [Older] Neville Antony: Full Throttle

    Coding period for GSoC 2020 has started and I have begun my work on my summer project. As said in my introductory post, I will be working on adding functionality to create and manage game collections in GNOME Games with help from Alexander (@alexm). After the project is complete, it will provide users with a shiny new ability to add any games to their own custom collections. And some additional feature to provide users with a quickly accessible, automatically generated collections such as recently played, favorites and hidden games.

    I started out by separating the work into independently manageable chunks so that I can open several smaller merge requests, rather than a single large one, which I can imagine would be horrible to manage, and even worse for Alexander to review. And my code, however small it is, usually needs a lot of fixing.

    So the first chunk I decided to work on is… Selection Mode! I decided selection mode would be the best part to start with so that when I get to modifying the database part to store all the collections and the games in it, I will have all the necessary functionality to test it with actual real world data rather than some made up data using temporary spaghetti code.

  • Neville Antony: GSoC Progress Update

    In my last blog post, I explained how selection mode was implemented in Games. That was one of the first steps to support Collections in Games, as an efficient way to select games to add/remove from collection is crucial for managing collections. In this post I’ll be talking about how “Favorites Collection” will be implemented in GNOME Games.

    [...]

    The first thing to do was to introduce a Collection interface to define a behavior that all types of collections must follow. All collections must have an ID and a title. Apart from that, all collections must provide a way to add and remove games from it. And on adding or removing a game from the collection, it should emit a “game added” or “game removed” signal respectively. A collection must also implement a load(), which when called, should load the games belonging to a collection from the database. Since there’s going to be different types of collections, how a collection has to be loaded might differ from each other.

    Every collection has its own GameModel and must implement a get_game_model(). A GameModel is a ListModel which stores the list of games in a collection, and get_game_model() returns its GameModel which can be bound to the flowbox of a GamesPage (a widget where games can be displayed with thumbnail and title).

    Other than these, all collections must also implement on_game_added(), on_game_removed() and on_game_replaced(). These are unrelated to games being added or removed to or from a collection. These has to do with games being discovered, and when some games are no longer available to the app. When a game is discovered by tracker or a cached game is loaded, it is added to a games hash table. This emits a game_added signal (unrelated to a collection’s game_added), which every collection listens to. If the added game belongs to the collection, it adds this game to the collection. Similarly on_game_removed() and on_game_replaced() handles stuff related to when a game which was cached but is no longer found by the app, and when a game has been renamed, moved to a different directory, or when it’s still the same cached game but with different UID etc.

    With the general behavior of a collection defined, it was time to introduce a FavoritesCollection which implements Collection.

Games: Terra Nil, Vagrus, SteamDolls and More

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Gaming
  • Rebuild the ecosystem in the latest Terra Nil update

    Terra Nil is a city-builder that's about rebuilding the ecosystem and getting everything green, rather than painting the map grey with towers full of people. Originally made during a Game Jam, it's since been expanded that we covered before and again recently a huge update went out for it.

    You start off with nothing, just dirt and rocks and eventually need to turn it into a garden of eden. It's actually a little challenging too, as you need to carefully work around the wasteland to produce energy and water to expand without running out of your greenery currency.

  • Narrative RPG 'Vagrus - The Riven Realms' enters Early Access on July 22

    Vagrus - The Riven Realms is a currently in-development narrative-focused RPG that's currently doing a hybrid crowdfunding model on Fig and it's getting a wider release this month.

    Currently if you pledge on the Fig campaign you get Early Access there but they've now confirmed the GOG and Steam release will happen on July 22. Exciting, since it's actually quite remarkable and it's already won awards. Mixing together open-world exploration, turn-based strategic battles, resource management and more with engrossing writing and a fantastic art style I think it's something you're going to love.

  • Beyond a Steel Sky now confirmed for Linux PC on July 16

    After a recent Apple Arcade release and a bit of teasing about when PC players will get it on Steam, Revolution Software have now confirmed the date for Beyond a Steel Sky.

    On July 16, Beyond a Steel Sky will launch for Linux PC and Windows PC via Steam. For a GOG release, they have not confirmed if it's coming or any date yet. This date was confirmed on YouTube and Twitter.

    Beyond a Steel Sky is the long awaited sequel to Beneath a Steel Sky. Revolution Software actually are the original developer of Beneath a Steel Sky, plus Broken Sword: The Shadow of the Templars, Broken Sword II: The Smoking Mirror and more.

  • Dota 2 gets an 'Anonymous Mode' similar to options in CS:GO, TI10 Cache up

    Valve just quietly updated Dota 2 to include a new 'Anonymous Mode' bringing in options similar to what you can tweak in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.

    This new mode doesn't make you actually anonymous, so the name itself is perhaps a tiny bit misleading taken at face value. What it actually does at the tick of a box is clean up everyone else for you. For everyone not on your friends list it will (or at least it should) clear away avatars, nicknames and in-game chat messages. It will also stop guild info being sent from guilds you're not actually in.

  • Steampunk-inspired metroidvania 'Steamdolls' is a big Kickstarter success

    With David Hayter (the legendary Solid Snake) taking the the lead role as The Whisper, the steampunk inspired Steamdolls has been a huge success on Kickstarter.

    SteamDolls is a steampunk inspired metroidvania game with a grimy touch of brutality. You assume the role of a cunning thief and anarchist known as "The Whisper" and make your way through heavily secured environments. Blast your way to your objective or stick to the shadows and perform a violent "backstab kill" on unsuspecting guards as you struggle with the haunting apparitions of a mesmerizing witch trying to reveal the truth about a conspiracy that could shake the very foundation of the world.

  • Top-down tactical shooter RUNNING WITH RIFLES to get a German DLC

    RUNNING WITH RIFLES, a popular tactical shooter from Osumia Games is set to get a second expansion this August focused on the Germans.

    The expansion, RUNNING WITH RIFLES: EDELWEISS heads to the European theatre of World War II, first parachuting into Sicily before moving on to the invasion of Normandy, Belgium, and more. Focussing mostly on an 'Allied Paratrooper' narrative, Edelweiss charts the progress of the Allies attacks across Europe. They're saying it should release on August 27 unless there's major issues.

  • Demonstrating Perl with Tic-Tac-Toe, Part 3

    The articles in this series have mainly focused on Perl’s ability to manipulate text. Perl was designed to manipulate and analyze. But Perl is capable of much more. More complex problems often require working with sets of data objects and indexing and comparing them in elaborate ways to compute some desired result.

    For working with sets of data objects, Perl provides arrays and hashes. Hashes are also known as associative arrays or dictionaries. This article will prefer the term hash because it is shorter.

    The remainder of this article builds on the previous articles in this series by demonstrating basic use of arrays and hashes in Perl.

Games: Top Titles, MergeGames, Best Racing Games for Android

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Gaming
  • Our quick-picks of the best Linux games of 2020 so far

    We're halfway through the year already? Madness. Even with all the craziness of 2020 going on, lots of games still managed to get out of the door. I know, I can't believe 2020 isn't over yet either. Thankfully there's plenty of games to take our minds off everything from murder hornets to COVID19 and more.

    Now we're at the halfway point, let's think about some of the top Linux releases of 2020 so far. This list is extremely subjective of course, this is just my personal pick on the top 15. Think of it as a starting point for good games to look at if you're stuck for something. In no particular order, going up to June 30 and I'm cheating just a little bit by including some Early Access titles too.

  • Action-adventure 'Sparklite' adds Linux support in a big update

    MergeGames, together with developers Red Blue Games have now released their action-adventure Sparklite on Linux along with a fresh content update.

    Originally released towards the end of 2019, Sparklite is an action-adventure set in the whimsical and ever-changing land of Geodia. With gorgeous pixel art and a top-down perspective, you battle foes using an arsenal of gadgets, guns, and gear. If you played and enjoyed Moonlighter, you would probably feel right at home with Sparklite too.

  • Best Racing Games for Android

    When it comes to video gaming, racing is the most popular genre, whether it is mobile gaming, pc gaming, or on any other gaming console. Racing games on Android have so much competition between them and the genre is crowded with tons of racing games. Every racing game has its own unique features and every gamer has his or her own preferences. In this genre, there is a large number of excellent free-to-play and paid games available for mobile users. This article covers the best racing games, in a variety of settings and with many different features for each unique user’s needs.

Games: Steam on Chrome OS, Space and More

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Gaming
  • Steam is Coming to Chromebooks with Ubuntu-based “Borealis” Feature

    Chrome OS has the ability to run desktop and command line Linux apps now Google plans to expand this support to include Linux games too.

    And when we’re talking about gaming on Linux we’re of course talking about Steam, the premiere games distribution platform created by Valve that is available natively for Linux desktop operating systems.

    Google equipping Chrome OS’s gaming feature as part of a project called “Borealis“. This is not only enigmatic sounding but also hugely exciting if you are an Ubuntu fan.

  • Chrome OS appears to be edging closer to Steam support with Linux

    Looks like Linux gaming may get yet another boost, thanks to Google? Yes. Backing up previous information on Steam support coming to Chrome OS it looks like the project is still going.

    This isn't some kind of wild rumour either, given the previous info with Google's own Kan Liu confirming their plans. This time the report comes from 9to5Google, which points out something being worked on called "Borealis" which appears to be a kind of Virtual Machine with a full copy of Ubuntu and Steam pre-installed and ready to go. It's interesting as they already had Crostini with Debian but it appears they're going a different way for Steam.

  • Kerbal Space Program 'Shared Horizons' is out with ESA missions and comets

    Ready to spend another thousand hours building spaceships and now chasing comets? Take charge of the Kerbal Space Program once again in the latest free upgrade.

    This is quite a significant update to KSP too, bringing in their European Space Agency (ESA) content including the ESA space-suit texture, new parts and variants, and two of their most iconic and groundbreaking missions into the game. So now you will be able to build the Ariane 5, visit comets and more.

  • Dark sci-fi action RPG 'Hellpoint' launches July 30

    Hellpoint from Cradle Games and tinyBuild is now set to officially release with Linux support on July 30. Originally funded on Kickstarter back in 2017, with 1,351 backers pledging around $63,553 Canadian Dollars we're keen to see the full release.

    Set in the aftermath of a massive quantum cataclysm called the Merge. You wake up on board the Irid Novo space station, a beacon of galactic cooperation and scientific exploration where everything has gone horribly wrong. What happens next will be solely determined by your choices.

  • The 'Update of Plenty' has arrived for Dead Cells - revamping lots

    The 19th update for Dead Cells is a bit of a big one, overhauling quite a lot of game mechanics and the overall difficulty.

    "Dead Cells is a rogue-lite, metroidvania inspired, action-platformer. You'll explore a sprawling, ever-changing castle... assuming you’re able to fight your way past its keepers in 2D souls-lite combat. No checkpoints. Kill, die, learn, repeat."

    One of my favourite indie games by far, and awesome to see it continue to update and expand. This time they're not adding in new enemies and weapons but going over Dead Cells with a fine-tooth comb to ensure your play-through is as smooth as it can be.

  • Thief inspired FOSS stealth game The Dark Mod has a massive new release

    The Dark Mod, a free and open-source first-person stealth game inspired by the Thief series has a huge new release up.

    Powered by the open-source id Tech 4 game engine (the Doom 3 engine), The Dark Mod is an impressive stand-alone project that has quite a lot of community-created mission packs available. The Dark Mod 2.08 has been in development for over a year, and it's quite an impressive boost with lots of underlying modern tech upgrades like using more modern OpenGL techniques.

  • A chat with the developer of the action-packed roguelike Burning Knight

    Burning Knight is a recently released action-packed roguelike, featuring slick pixel-art and fantastic lighting along with plenty of over the top action and a little sprinkle of comedy.

    As part of our ongoing series of speaking to game developers, we sat down and had a chat with the developer about it and how the release went.

Games for GNU/Linux and Upcoming Console Atari VCS Sets Date

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Gaming
  • Stadia exclusive Crayta is out, plus more Stadia Pro titles and UI updates

    Crayta, the promising looking multiplayer game creation tool is now available exclusively on Stadia and there's more Stadia news to cover today.

    [...]

    The big one is Crayta, which allows people to jump into games together online and also make their own. It comes ready with multiple games like Prop Hunt, Crayta Cooking (looks like Overcooked), Disaster Party where you need to just stay alive as long as possible and more.

  • Sandbox vehicle building adventure 'TerraTech' gets some fun new tech

    Although it already has tons of blocks to make crazy vehicles with, Payload Studios clearly aren't finished expanding TerraTech and this latest update looks fun.

    Mixing together a block-based vehicle building system, open-world environments and a full sandbox-style campaign where you go at your own pace, TerraTech can be a lot of fun if you enjoy getting lost in a big world. It's satisfying mix of scavenging, crafting, combat and exploration together make for a fun experience.

    You can build some truly insane stuff too and the latest set of blocks and missions are in with the Reticule Research update.

  • Open source OpenXR runtime 'Monado' expands with multi-application support

    Monado is the in-development OpenXR runtime for VR / AR on Linux and Collabora continue to make excellent progress on bringing it up to eventually support more platforms and features.

    Currently developed for Linux while they get as much feature and hardware support as possible, it's taken another big step recently. The team recently implemented OpenXR's XR_EXTX_overlay extension, which will now expose the multi-application capabilities of Monado which was recently merged into the project.

  • Now crowdfunding - Neko Ghost, Jump! blends 2D and 3D puzzle-platforming

    After a puzzle-platformer that's a little unique and challenging? Neko Ghost, Jump! blends together traditional 2D platforming and 3D modes to offer a fresh take.

    Mentioned very briefly here on GOL back in February, it's quite a sweet idea. You're able to switch between modes at any time during a level and you need to do so in order to complete the puzzles since some paths, obstacles and enemies might be hidden in one view.

    It's now crowdfunding on Kickstarter to get the monies needed to finish it, with a $15,000 base goal and it has until July 31 to hit it. The demo that was previously available was also expanded to include Ghost Blocks that you need to change into a special ghost form to interact with, 9 languages, new artwork and performance optimizations.

  • Linux-powered Atari VCS ships for backers in October, full release by end of year

    It seems the Atari VCS is not dead and will actually be seeing a launch this year, as Atari themselves have now confirmed.

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo that raised over three million dollars they've seen repeated delays, a lawsuit or two and plenty of ridicule from other publications. Still, they kept at it, giving out updates on their Medium blog about the ongoing production and optimization process.

    Back in April they claimed mass production had started, although when you saw the actual post details it was only 500 units total. Not exactly mass production but okay, whatever. Last month in June they mentioned they had 96 actually be delivered to them, although 500 were in fact produced with "more than 10,000 VCS units this summer" to be ready.

  • Atari VCS is going directly head-to-head with the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X this Christmas

    Atari have announced that their long in-development PC/console hybrid is going to be arriving with their crowdfunding backers this October before going on general sale in time for Christmas.

    The Atari VCS looks lovely, but it certainly is going to be a hard sell to the wider public - we're still unsure who they're actually targeting. The system will be packed with a number of classic Atari titles along with support for AntStream Arcade for retro classics across other platforms. It supposedly is also a full PC that can run other OSes through the Sandbox mode meaning you can pop Windows 10 onto an external drive and access your Steam, Epic and other libraries.

    The Atari VCS features an AMD Raven Ridge 2 CPU alongside an unspecified AMD Ryzen GPU. It will pack with 4GB or 8GB RAM and internal storage of 32GB with support for external hard drives.

    The HDMI output supports 4K video and the OS is based on Ubuntu, but as mentioned you can install your own OS on there if you choose.

  • 11 years ago this month GOL was created, Happy Birthday to GamingOnLinux

    From the rise and fall of LinuxGamePublishing, Humble Indie Bundles, the indie store Desura rising and falling, Steam and GOG started supporting Linux, itch.io grew much bigger, the Vulkan API being formally released, Steam Machines plus SteamOS, Steam Play, the slow rise of game streaming services and more. We've seen such a huge amount of ups and downs over the years. We plan to continue going for the next 11 years and beyond too! So we hope you will stick with us for daily Linux + Gaming news.

  • Command the undead as shields and weapons in Millions of Minions

    Millions of Minions: An Underground Adventure is a brand new dungeon crawler that recently released into Steam Early Access, giving a slightly unique take on it.

    With a setting and layout clearly inspired by the likes of Isaac and others, you crawl through a dungeon with small enclosed rooms as you fight off waves of enemies. Here though you're not using swords or anything like that, instead you gather energy and summon a bunch of little minions. You then use them as shields and send them flying towards enemies. It's actually a little amusing.

    [...]

    There's a demo up on Steam too if you want to try before you buy. I've spent a little time with it and while it feels a lot more simpler than the likes of The Binding of Isaac, the streamlined feel might be better for quick runs when you're shorter on time. It will be interesting to see how much they do expand this over Early Access.

  • Craft slick chiptune music for games or fun as FamiStudio adds Linux builds

    FamiStudio, a pretty fun looking program designed for people making chiptune music and NES homebrewers recently had a big new release and it came with their first Linux build.

    Quite an impressive feature set too with it being able to export to various formats, not only that though the editor itself has some sweet features. Some you would expect like Copy/Paste and Undo/Redo along with Volume, fine pitch, vibrato effect tracks and more. The latest release adds in some great sounding features too (on top of Linux support) like trackpad controls, a command-line interface, extended MIDI keyboard support, improved WAV export and import of instruments from any supported format.

  • FMV mystery thriller 'Jessika' will launch on August 25

    Assemble Entertainment and Tritrie Games have confirmed that Jessika, a full-motion video mystery-adventure will be launching with Linux support on August 25.

    Your job as a digital content specialist is to go through the footprint left behind by deceased people, on behalf of their relatives. In Jessika, the subject is a sensitive one as it's touching on suicide and it seems their family are determined to find out why. What at first seems to be a job like any other quickly develops into a dark drama with twists and turns.

  • FNA3D now has Vulkan support in Alpha, FNA 20.07 is out

    FNA3D, the upcoming advanced graphics library for FNA has reached a new milestone on the way to full Vulkan support.

    As a refresher - FNA was originally a fork of MonoGame, with an aim to be an accuracy-focused reimplementation of Microsoft's XNA. It's since expanded and improved in huge ways and FNA3D is the next step. FNA3D was announced back in May, as a more advanced rendering system for FNA that brings with it better performance and the ability to support other graphics APIs.

    FNA is used in tons of games like TowerFall Ascension, Streets of Rage 4, FEZ, Dust: An Elysian Tail, Rogue Legacy, Chasm, Axiom Verge and the list goes on for a while.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Charming dungeon crawling adventure 'UnderMine' launches August 6

    After about five years in development and close to 120,000 players later, UnderMine is getting ready to leave Early Access on August 6 to have you dig deep for gold.

    The big 1.0 introduces a new final boss encounter with a cinematic ending, post-credits story content, additional scenarios, plus new items, enemies, challenges, and of course, secrets. The full game arrives after nearly a year in Early Access, which had five major content updates that added in new levels, bosses, the Othermine "true roguelike mode", and more which might be the biggest update yet. Thorium also confirmed more is to come after release.

  • Ideas for Game Projects in C++

    Before you start programming, it is good to know more about your idea than the basic idea. You need to go beyond “A creature running through a forest.” Build a story; users can relate to and then decide what it needs to feel real. Having said that, to get started, you need to select these details.
    In this article, you will see a few ideas on what you can build quickly to get some action on the screen. Simply put, you should use these ideas for the on-screen work after your idea for the entire story is ready.

  • Prime OS Review an Indian Android Emulator for Playing PUBG Mobile and Call of Duty

    If you haven’t heard of Prime OS then you’re not alone. It’s a new android emulator that is very different from what most users including myself are used to. Most android emulators function on your laptop or desktop as a virtual machine that runs on top of Windows. Prime OS is very different from them. Prime OS is more like Chrome OS without limited functions. It runs separately from windows. Prime OS offers users something that no other android emulator is offering right now. That is to use the Android OS as a fully functioning replacement for Windows on desktops.

    [...]

    If you need to choose between Prime OS or Ubuntu as your other operating system then the obvious choice is Ubuntu. Ubuntu is a proper desktop operating system that offers a lot of functionality and practicality than android on desktops. Choose Prime OS only if you want a proper android experience on a desktop.

  • MediaTek Helio G35 & G25 Entry-Level SoCs Feature MediaTek HyperEngine Game Technology

    So far, the company had integrated the HyperEngine technology into premium SoCs such as Helio G80 or Helio G90T powered by Cortex-A75/A76 cores, and BiFrost GPUs. There are aggressively Helio G90T priced phones such as Redmi Note 8 Pro going for about $240, but to address the lower-end side of the market, MediaTek has now introduced Helio G35 and G25 octa-core Cortex-A53 SoC with HyperEngine Game Technology.

Games: Android, 7 Days to Die, Bounty Battle and Paint the Town Red

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Gaming
  • Best offline games for Android

    Many Android games rely on an internet connection. Some of them need to download data from the server, like Clash of Clans, or need DRM protection, like most Final Fantasy games. Anyway,you may find that most games require a web connection just for the game to run. But that is not true. Not everyone has the luxury of always having a stable internet connection, so we selected the top Android games offline, that is, you would not require a 4G or a Wi-Fi connection to play them.

    In fact, the Android app store itself, Google Play, has a category called ” Offline games “, launched in 2014. This category offers free and paid games that do not require Internet access. The category is updated frequently, always bringing new games . So if you want to stay up to date, you might want to take a look at this category every now and then.

  • 7 Days to Die 'Alpha 19 Experimental' is out with HD Zombies

    The Fun Pimps are working towards another huge upgrade for the survival game 7 Days to Die, with a new experimental build out now to try.

    It's a massive upgrade again to many areas of the game, and it does sound quite exciting. One of the best survival games available on Linux, easily. Alpha 19 can be tried out in the "latest_experimental" Beta branch on Steam. Keep in mind it will be unstable since it's not yet ready for everyone. With that in mind though, it's still fun to try. Some of what's new includes: Linear Color Space Lighting, Food and Water Bars in the UI, New Survival System & Critical Injuries, Interactive Loading Screen and even HD Characters, like my friend pictured below while exploring myself earlier.

  • Bounty Battle the 'ultimate indie fighting game' releasing July 23

    Featuring an all-star fighting cast from various indie games, the fighting game Bounty Battle is due to release on July 23.

    Inspired by the likes of Skullgirls and Street Fighter, it's a multiplayer 2D fighter that gives you access to over 20 characters taken from games like Guacamelee!, Darkest Dungeon, Dead Cells, Owlboy and more. It was funded on Fig back in 2017, with help from 334 backers and a bunch of money from Fig directly too.

    Just recently, they confirmed in an announcement that it's due to launch on July 23. In the comments, they mentioned the Linux version should be launching at the same time too.

  • First-person melee combat expands in Paint the Town Red

    The highly rated first-person melee combat game Paint the Town Red is violent, bloody and getting bigger.

    Released into Early Access back in 2015, this ultra-violent game of punching and kicking has continued to expand with new content and game modes with it going on to receive a very high user rating on Steam. As bloody as it is, Paint the Town Red isn't supposed to be taken seriously at all with it's blocky voxel-style.

    Over the last few months it's had some pretty huge updates which includes a 2-4 player cooperative multiplayer addition to Beneath, the rogue-like campaign mode. There's also now an Endless Mode for the Arena so you can keep fighting for as long as you can survive. Together the new modes add quite a bit of extra gameplay.

  • Godot 4.0 will get SDF based real-time global illumination

    While we already briefly mentioned SDF based real-time global illumination was coming in our post on the recent Godot Engine 3.2.2 release, Godot's Juan Linietsky has now explained the upcoming feature in more detail.

    Godot 4.0 is the massive rendering overhaul that's still a while away with Vulkan support, and over time new and more advanced 3D rendering features are making it in. SDFGI (Signed Distance Field Global Illumination), the latest mentioned addition, is a seriously fancy lighting technique that provides a form of real-time dynamic lighting. They said it's something akin to a dynamic real-time lightmap but it doesn't require unwrapping, nor does it use textures and it doesn't require Ray Tracing either - all while keeping performance in check.

  • OpenRA working to support C&C Remastered assets, Tiberian Sun work continues

    The team behind OpenRA have confirmed their continued commitment to working on the game engine to support Tiberian Dawn, Red Alert and Dune 2000 on modern platforms.

    Since the release of the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection, plus the open source code along with it from EA, people have questioned if OpenRA will continue and the good news is that it will. Not only that, it's going to get better than ever and work is ongoing.

    Thanks to the open source release of the Command & Conquer Remastered Collection code, the OpenRA team have already begun studying it and mentioned that while OpenRA takes things in a different and more modern direction, they have already been able to learn a few things.

  • Papercraft styled tactical RPG 'Wildermyth' adds Legacy campaigns

    Wildermyth is a seriously great in-development character-driven tactical RPG, with a fantastic papercraft style and it just got a great boost to the story.

    It's a little bit unusual actually. Combining the story-telling from classic tabletop D&D RPGs, with the combat of an XCOM-like with turn-based tactical options aplenty. Together with the style it's wonderful and I'm always happy to load it up for another run, now even more so. In Wildermyth, if you manage to complete one of the story campaigns, you get to promote one or more characters into a special Legacy pool, to find and recruit them during Legacy campaigns.

  • Sweet settlement building game The Colonists gets random maps

    Inspired in parts by The Settlers and Anno, The Colonists is a settlement building game about little robots trying to become a bit more human.

    "You take control of a team of self-replicating robots built to simulate human civilisation. After escaping Earth, The Colonists are now free to roam the galaxy in search of a new home and construct their dream settlement. You'll advance through three different Ages as you build infrastructure for your colony by constructing road, boat and train transport systems."

    Quite a sweet game actually, one I consider quite the gem if you're into such building games and it's been supported rather nicely since the original release in 2018. Since release it's gained new official maps, new translations, AI upgrades, a map editor, entirely new game mechanics and the latest being a random map generator.

Games: Shallow Space, Crusader Kings III and Lots More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Shallow Space development resumes, moved to Godot Engine

    Shallow Space, a 3D sci-fi RTS from 2015 that was initially very promising but ultimately ended up in development hell appears to be alive again.

    Writing on Steam, the developer made a post back in May titled "What happened here?" and briefly went over some of the issues. Things like limited resources, things not implemented properly, a publisher backed out on them and a key reseller got hold of a bunch of keys which apparently dried up their sales too.

    The developer went onto mention that since then they've continued learning, becoming a better developer and they've decided they're actually going to give it another go and finish Shallow Space. They've been tinkering behind the scenes for a few months now and have begun talking a little more about their plan.

  • Keep up with Crusader Kings III dev in another explainer video

    Inching ever closer to release on September 1, Crusader Kings III sounds very exciting and the latest developer video diary is out going over decision-making, how to cope with stress, changes made to events, and more.

    The decision system especially sounds like it will make a lot of interesting stories, how you're always working towards something but there's tons of smaller decisions you will be making often to affect characters.

  • Short-form narrative game 'We should talk.' arrives July 16

    It's not what you say, it's how you say it. We should talk. is an upcoming short-form narrative game about having a chat and it looks delightful.

    After a successful Kickstarter campaign, which didn't actually list Linux as a platform, it's confirmed to be releasing with Linux support on July 16. The idea is that it will make you think carefully about the words you choose. Using a 'unique' narrative choice mechanic, you'll craft sentences in response to the in-game characters in We should talk.

  • Monthly Games I've Played In Linux | June 2020

    Show your support and drop a like guys! Showcasing games I've been putting time to within the month, whether they're new or old!

  • Train Valley 2 hits over 1,000 maps on the Steam Workshop

    Need more from Train Valley 2? Well, if you have it on Steam there's an absolute ton of extra community-made content available in the Steam Workshop.

    Train Valley 2 is a train tycoon-style strategy puzzle game. You build tracks to deliver people across a map to different industries, to then deliver products to somewhere else. Build tracks, upgrade your locomotives, keep them constantly moving without letting any crash. It's good fun and some of the included levels are quite a challenge. What about when you've finished though?

    Including a built-in level editor can seriously help the longevity of a game, as there's obviously only so much a developer can directly make. Thankfully, Train Valley 2 has one and it's pretty easy to use which is likely why they've recently hit over 1,000 extra levels for players to play through.

  • Celestial Command adds 3D space physics and a new battle mode

    Celestial Command, a spaceship crafting survival sandbox game that's currently in Early Access doesn't get a lot of attention but it's quietly getting impressive.

    Released into Early Access back in 2014, it's been steadily going a while now. I completely forgot about it in fact, only recently was the first time I actually properly took a look at it. As a huge fan of space games, especially where there's a lot of customization and ship crafting, I'm a bit of a sucker for them and Celestial Command now feels truly promising.

  • Beyond a Steel Sky to release for Linux PC during July

    Beyond a Steel Sky, the exciting looking upcoming game from Revolution Software recently hit Apple Arcade and it appears the Steam release is soon too.

    Confirmed to be launching with Linux support, Beyond a Steel Sky is the long awaited sequel to Beneath a Steel Sky. Revolution Software actually are the original developer of Beneath a Steel Sky, plus Broken Sword: The Shadow of the Templars, Broken Sword II: The Smoking Mirror and more. With the Apple Arcade release out, they mentioned on Twitter that "July will not go by without you being able to play the game on Steam".

Godot 4.0 gets SDF based real-time global illumination

Filed under
Gaming

As work progresses on Godot 4.0 at a steady pace, a new and novel method of creating full-scene global illumination has been added in the master branch.

Read more

Also: Godot 4.0 Is Looking Even More Impressive With SDFGI

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