Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: Nobodies and Steam Play Proton 4.11-7

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Indivisible, Top 7 Best PSP Emulators for Android, Cecconoid, Orx, Hexa Trains and GGPO

Filed under
Gaming
  • Indivisible, the action RPG platformer from the creator of Skullgirls is out now

    It's been a long road, after being announced back in 2015 with a successful crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo it very much delivers. Honestly, I don't know where to really start with Indivisible. It's blown me away. This might be one of the most colourful and gorgeously designed games I've played in a very long time. It reminds me of the first time I played Bastion, it looks incredible.

  • Top 7 Best PSP Emulators for Android Device in 2019

    Gaming companies have produced special games for Playstation which are not often available for Android. So, it has become a great problem for them who love to play new and updated games but cannot afford a PlayStation. But technology doesn’t stay silent and has introduced us to new technology. It is the PSP emulator. You can easily run your favorite PSP games on your Android device using this PSP Emulators.

    [...]

    Here, you will find 7 innovative PSP emulators for Android. So, whatever devices you are using, you can use it if it is compatible with the PSP game you are going to run. So, just read out the important features to understand the specifications and choose the best PSP emulator for your device.

  • 8-bit inspired, flip-screen, twin-stick-shooter 'Cecconoid' is out with Linux support

    Triple Eh? Ltd yesterday released Cecconoid, an 8-bit inspired twin-stick shooter with a flip-screen mechanic where you go through a series of rooms and blow everything up.

  • Looking to make 2D games? Perhaps the Orx game engine might be suitable for you

    One we've never covered before at all is the free and open source Orx. A lightweight, plugin-based, data-driven and extremely easy to use 2D-oriented game engine.

    There's tons of game engines out there, quite a lot of them open source too. Recently we covered GDevelop, Godot Engine and ct.js so here's another one that might take your interest. Designed to be fully cross-platform across Linux, MacOS, Windows and mobile devices the feature list it offers is rather impressive.

  • Developed on Linux, the train transportation sim 'Hexa Trains' is out now

    After an unsuccessful Kickstarter campaign, solo developer Bram Stolk has released Hexa Trains on Steam. Developed on Linux, this unusually styled transportation sim certainly looks interesting. Note: Key provided to our Steam Curator.

    Stolk is the same developer who previously made The Little Crane That Could, which released back in 2015 on Steam and it ended up rather popular on mobile. Nice to see a familiar name return with something completely different. Hexa Trains is all about railroads, building up a successful and smooth transport service across a planet as you link stations across it to various resource buildings.

  • GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games has gone open source

    Oh how I do love to see more projects go open source! GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games that's designed to help hide network latency in fast-paced games that requires precise inputs is now on GitHub.

    Created originally by Tony Cannon, one of the founders of the Evolution Championship Series (EVO), GPPO is a well-known middleware in the fighting game scene. It's used in a number of games including Skullgirls, Brawlhalla, Fantasy Strike, Dragon Ball: Zenkai Battle, Killer Instinct and the list goes on. Cannon announced the change in licensing on Twitter earlier today.

Trouble in Atari VCS Land

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Gaming
  • Game over: Atari VCS architect quits project, claims he hasn’t been paid for six months

    The architect of Atari’s much-delayed retro console, the Atari VCS, has quit the project, claiming he hasn't been paid in six months. The departure could put the entire affair in doubt.

    Games industry veteran, one of the founding team members behind the Xbox, and Atari system architect, Rob Wyatt told The Register: “As of Friday, October 4th, I have officially resigned as the architect of the Atari VCS."

    The techie claimed "Atari haven't paid invoices going back over six months" to his design consultancy, Tin Giant, which was working on the VCS, adding: "As a small company, we have been lucky to survive this long.”

  • Things are going downhill for the Atari VCS as Rob Wyatt quits

    It's now confirmed that Rob Wyatt, someone who Atari made a big thing over joining them has quit citing non payment of invoices for at least six months.

    As confirmed by The Register who spoke to Wyatt, things have not been going well. Not only has Wyatt completely left the project, it sounds like Atari don't exactly know what they're doing. Originally, Atari said it would have their own Linux-based OS with an easy to use UI and their own store. According to sources The Register spoke to who've had direct contact with the VCS project, that might no longer happen. Sounds like it's turning into a regular Linux box now.

    No game developers have signed up to make original games, which is something I expected after their first announcement about actual games years after the IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign was a retro streaming service. On top of that, they've not been able to pull in the big game engines like Unreal or Unity too.

Games: OpenTESArena, Neo Cab, Don't Starve Together and Voxel Turf

Filed under
Gaming
  • OpenTESArena, an open source re-implementation of The Elder Scrolls: Arena

    A fun open source game engine project we've not covered here before is OpenTESArena, an open source re-implementation of The Elder Scrolls: Arena and it just had a new release.

    Inspired by other similar projects like OpenXcom and OpenMW, their aim is to have a clean and cross-platform version using the original assets which you can get free from Bethesda. A few days ago a new release was put out to include Wilderness generation, Wilderness automap, City <-> wilderness transitions via city gate, City placeholder in wilderness, Player position in wilderness displayed with F2, CD version support and initial work on inventory slots.

  • Hold onto your humanity as the incredibly stylish Neo Cab is coming to Linux

    After some confusion, it turns out Neo Cab from developer Chance Agency and publisher Fellow Traveller will be coming to Linux.

    What is it? In Neo Cab, you play as Lina, someone making a last stand as a human driver-for-hire in a world increasingly overcome by automation. It's seriously stylish and has a story that will make you think about the way the world is going.

  • Don't Starve Together launches another big free update with 'Return of them - Salty Dog'

    Easily one of the best and most stylish multiplayer survival games available on Linux, Don't Starve Together has another big free update out with Return of them - Salty Dog.

    Don't Starve Together is becoming a rather large game now, there's so much to explore it's easy to get lost in the world. This is the full release of a recent Beta they did last month.

  • First-person block-based urban sandbox city-builder 'Voxel Turf' adds new biomes

    Voxel Turf is such a unique gem that blends multiple types of games together. It allows you to run around in first-person, build a city and fight off gangs. A big surprise update just dropped too.

    More work on performance went into this update, with the developer adding in "more intelligent entity culling". They say on average you should see an increase of 10% FPS in built-up busy areas which sounds good. They also did some map adjustments for bandits and dungeons not drawing unless you're in one and sun/moonlight shadows are not drawn while you are underground resulting in a big speedup in certain areas too.

Games: Amanita Design, 7 Days to Die, Blender

Filed under
Gaming
  • Amanita Design return to Linux with the surprise new release of Pilgrims

    Amanita Design are the developers of games including Machinarium, Botanicula, Samorost and more. Today, they released Pilgrims, a playful adventure game and it supports Linux. Note: Key from the developer.

    Seems they've now moved over to using the Unity game engine, which has likely helped them support Linux again as previous titles used a mix of Flash and Adobe Air. As for Pilgrims, I had honestly not heard of it at all so it was quite a surprise to see it in the GamingOnLinux inbox this morning. Seems they were a bit sneaky and just stealth released it!

  • The survival game 7 Days to Die has a huge new experimental release out

    A day some of our readers have been eagerly awaiting, 7 Days to Die has a big Alpha 18 experimental build available to try. It's an absolutely massive release as usual, as they leave it a long time before updates.

    Performance has been a bit of a focus for this release. Thankfully. A new Occlusion System made it in, so that a lot of things that are on-screen but not visible to you don't actually render to improve FPS. However, they said it adds "some minor popping artifacts, where occluded objects may take a moment to appear" and so it's a setting you can turn off. The Unity game engine was updated to Unity 2019.1 as well, which should prevent a lot of the hitching seen before with better "Garbage Collection". There's plenty more performance work that went in, which all sounds pretty great. While the gameplay in 7 Days to Die has been fun for a long time, performance has been a serious weak point for it.

    The item schematic system is back in the game. Meaning on your travels you can now find them and permanently unlock how to craft certain items and entire groups of items. The early game should be a bit more forgiving on encumbrance, as they've removed a whole row and there's pocket mods to craft for clothing to reduce encumbrance early on. HD icons were added for all blocks and items, a new terrain shader, improved reflections, a coyote and mountain lion were added, Zombies can ragdoll when they fall and the list just keeps going on.

  • The Blender team have secured even more funding, this time from NVIDIA

    Following on from Ubisoft and Epic Games becoming Blender sponsors, NVIDIA have also thrown a bucket full on money into the ring.

Games: Dwarves of Glistenveld, Stadia, Oxygen Not Included, Planetary Annihilation and Children of Morta

Filed under
Gaming
  • Mixing strategy and RPG elements The Dwarves of Glistenveld is entering Early Access soon

    Dig deep for riches, just not too deep or you might find some Goblins lurking around. The Dwarves of Glistenveld is confirmed to be entering Early Access on October 18th. Linux support is confirmed too, as the developer clearly replied to us on Twitter.

  • Alen Ladavac, co-founder of Croteam has left to join the Google Stadia team, plus other Stadia news

    Here's a bit of interesting industry news for you on this fine Monday afternoon. Alen Ladavac, who help to co-found the Serious Sam and Talos Principle developer Croteam has moved onto game streaming.

  • Oxygen Not Included should perform a lot better with the latest update

    While Oxygen Not Included is one of my favourite games to come out in the last year, it did have a few performance issues here and there which the latest update should hopefully solve.

    Klei Entertainment don't just make interesting games, they support them for a long time too. Oxygen Not Included left Early Access back in July and the first big post-release update landed last week to improve the experience for everyone. Klei said they did a "big performance pass and removed a lot of spikes, leading to a smoother experience in every colony we tested". They also worked on some new profiling tools to help them track down performance issues, which is what helped with this update.

  • Planetary Annihilation: TITANS has a big update available with major Linux issues

    Planetary Annihilation Inc continue updating and expanding their massive scale RTS Planetary Annihilation: TITANS with a new major update available.

    [...]

    As a big fan of Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and someone who supported it since Kickstarter and then later upgraded to a much higher tier this makes me incredibly sad to see. Willingly pushing out an update that breaks it completely on modern Linux distributions isn't really acceptable.

  • Story-driven action RPG 'Children of Morta' is still coming to Linux but no ETA

    Children of Morta, a very good looking story-driven action RPG from Dead Mage and 11 bit studios release in early September. It was supposed to have Linux support but they've been pretty quiet on it.

    We wrote about this back in June, noting that the developer confirmed a Linux version was still happening. Sadly the release came and went with no word on the Linux version. However, searching around on September 24th they did reply on Steam to say that "We plan to add Linux support, yes. Again, can't promise any dates at the moment.". Today as well, the publisher 11 bit studios did also email GamingOnLinux to confirm this "It's happening, but right now we don't have an exact date of when it will be available.".

Games: Godot 3.2 Alpha and Throne of Lies on GNU/Linux (Status)

Filed under
Gaming
  • DEV SNAPSHOT: GODOT 3.2 ALPHA 1

    After close to 7 months of development and over 4,000 commits since the 3.1 release, we are now happy to release Godot 3.2 alpha 1, our first milestone towards the next stable installment of our free and open source game engine.

    This first alpha build comes relatively late in our planned release schedule, mostly because of work done on our official build infrastructure to adapt to 3.2 requirements (changes to the Android buildsystem and packaging, especially with the new C# support), as well as a build server upgrade. But we have been in the alpha stage since August 31, and testers and developers were not idle in the meantime, so the master branch from which 3.2 will be released is already quite stable. As such we expect the alpha and beta phases to be quite short for Godot 3.2, and a stable release within one or two months should be possible.

    The alpha stage corresponds for us to a feature freeze, as announced on GitHub a month ago, which means that we will no longer consider pull requests with new features for merge in the master branch, and that until Godot 3.2 is released. This way, we can focus on what we already have, finish and polish the major features which are still in progress, and fix many of the old and new bugs reported by the community.

    Alpha snapshots will be released regularly during this phase, to continuously test the master branch and make sure that it keeps getting more stable, reliable and ready for production.

    Note: While we are behind schedule, we still plan to release Godot 3.1.2 as soon as time permits.

  • Godot 3.2 Enters Alpha With Many Improvements

    While we are eager to see Godot 4.0 with its new Vulkan renderer and other improvements, Godot 3.2 is coming out first and this weekend marks the alpha release for this latest update to this leading open-source, cross-platform game engine.

  • Throne of Lies ends support for Linux but it could return in future

    Joining Rust, Natural Selection 2 and Forager this year is Throne of Lies from Imperium42 Game Studio who have decided to end Linux support for their online multiplayer game.

    Posted in their Discord today in the Linux channel, which you only see if you've added yourself to a special role, was an announcement about Linux support ending. They've also already removed the SteamOS icon from the Steam store page.

    Why? Well, it seems they've been having some issues with hackers recently.

Graphics and Games: ROCm, Zink, DXVK, ProtonDB

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Radeon ROCm 2.9 Released With New "RALI" Library, rocTX

    Just one week after the release of Radeon Open Compute 2.8, AMD has now released ROCm 2.9 as the newest feature release for this open-source GPU Linux compute stack for Radeon hardware.

    Radeon Open Compute 2.9 introduces the Radeon Augmentation Library "RALI" for efficient decoding and handling of images from a variety of formats via a programmable processing graph. ROCm 2.9 also introduces rocTX as a new C API for performance profiling.

  • Zink's OpenGL Over Vulkan Implementation Aiming For Mesa 19.3 Integration

    For the past year "Zink" has been in development as the OpenGL API implemented over Vulkan and done as a Gallium3D driver. That code by Collabora's Erik Faye-Lund will likely be merged to Mesa 19.3 in the coming weeks.

    After talking about Zink the first time at last year's XDC, Erik Faye-Lund provided an update at this week's XDC 2019 event in Montreal. Zink remains focused on serving as a Gallium driver translating Gallium API calls into Vulkan, which for the main part means using the OpenGL state tracker to get a full OpenGL implementation running over Vulkan. At this time, OpenGL 2.1 / OpenGL ES 2.0 is supported but more extensions and various optimizations continue to be pursued.

  • DXVK 1.4.2 Released With Fix For Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered

    DXVK 1.4.2 is out as another weekly update to this Direct3D 11 over Vulkan translation library used by Wine / Proton for accelerating Windows games on Linux.

  • A little look over ProtonDB reports for Steam Play in September 2019

    Like our look over the data for August, we're going to continue this method of looking over the top twenty titles being most reported through September. This is basically the list of what games were the most popular in terms of users testing and reporting how they work with Steam Play. If they have a number of Platinum and Gold ratings, they probably work quite well. Sorted by total number of ratings, while also showing how many were Platinum or Gold to give you a good idea how they run overall.

Total War: WARHAMMER II - The Hunter & the Beast DLC Released for Linux and Mac

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Developed by Creative Assembly and published by SEGA, the Total War: WARHAMMER II was ported by Feral Interactive to the Linux and macOS platforms on November 20th, 2018. The game launched with the Mortal Empires DLC, as well as other free or paid DLCs that where released since the initial launch of the game back in October 2017.

The Hunter & the Beast is the latest Downloadable Content (DLC) for Total War: WARHAMMER II, bringing many new additions like two new Legendary Lords: Markus Wulfhart, who leads the Huntsmarshal’s Expedition (Empire), and Nakai The Wanderer, who leads the Spirit of the Jungle (Lizardmen). Both the new Legendary Lords come with their own faction mechanics, legendary items, quest-chains, campaign narrative, and skill-trees for the Vortex Campaign.

Read more

Games: Veloren, Demons Never Lie, Second Earth, Logitech Gaming Keyboards

Filed under
Gaming
  • Keep an eye on 'Veloren', an open source multiplayer voxel RPG written in Rust

    Move over Cube World, there's a new open source voxel RPG in town under development called Veloren and it supports Linux too so there's a bonus point for you.

    Inspired by many games like Cube World, Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Dwarf Fortress and Minecraft it's currently under heavy development, thanks to user email tips I've been keeping a close eye on this one. I don't want to get your hopes up too high but it's already coming along well and shows a ridiculous amount of promise. I could see myself playing this for sure.

  • Lose your soul in the creepy adventure game Demons Never Lie, now with a Linux demo

    Releasing sometime around Halloween this year, the quite creepy adventure game Demons Never Lie now has a Linux demo available to try out on Steam.

  • Second Earth, the currently free base building strategy game from Free Lives had a huge upgrade

    Somewhat inspired by the satire of Starship Troopers, Second Earth is the current free prototype base building strategy game from Free Lives (developer of Broforce).

    It's a mixture of a real-time strategy game about building up a strong economy, with a tower defence like wrapping. Each map requires you to build up a strong base and then defeat waves of alien bugs. Build walls to keep you civilians safe, build weapon towers to squish all the bugs and service guarantees citizenship.

  • Logitech Gaming Keyboards Getting A New Driver With Linux 5.5

    The Logitech G15 keyboards and related gaming keyboards from the company are seeing a new open-source driver queued ahead of the Linux 5.5 kernel cycle.

    Red Hat's Hans de Goede who has made prolific contributions to the Linux desktop support over the past decade to numerous different areas has been focusing some time recently on this new Logitech gaming keyboard driver.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Python Across Platforms

  • Chemists bitten by Python scripts: How different OSes produced different results during test number-crunching

    Chemistry boffins at the University of Hawaii have found, rather disturbingly, that different computer operating systems running a particular set of Python scripts used for their research can produce different results when running the same code. In a research paper published last week in the academic journal Organic Letters, chemists Jayanti Bhandari Neupane, Ram Neupane, Yuheng Luo, Wesley Yoshida, Rui Sun, and Philip Williams describe their efforts to verify an experiment involving cyanobacteria, better known as blue-green algae. Williams, associate chair and professor in the department of chemistry at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, said in a phone interview with The Register on Monday this week that his group was looking at secondary metabolites, like penicillin, that can be used to treat cancer or Alzheimer's.

  • Chemists discover cross-platform Python scripts not so cross-platform

    In a paper published October 8, researchers at the University of Hawaii found that a programming error in a set of Python scripts commonly used for computational analysis of chemistry data returned varying results based on which operating system they were run on—throwing doubt on the results of more than 150 published chemistry studies. While trying to analyze results from an experiment involving cyanobacteria, the researchers—Jayanti Bhandari Neupane, Ram Neupane, Yuheng Luo, Wesley Yoshida, Rui Sun, and Philip Williams—discovered significant variations in results run against the same nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) data. The scripts, called the "Willoughby-Hoye" scripts after their authors—Patrick Willoughby and Thomas Hoye of the University of Minnesota—were found to return correct results on macOS Mavericks and Windows 10. But on macOS Mojave and Ubuntu, the results were off by nearly a full percent.

today's leftovers

  • Fedora Removes 32bit, System76 Coreboot, Flatpak, Valve, Atari VCS, Docker | This Week in Linux 84

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we talk about Fedora Removing 32-bit, well sort of. System76’s announced two laptops using Coreboot firmware. There is some interesing news regarding Docker and its future. Then we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news with some really exciting news from Valve! 

  • PostgreSQL 12 boosts open source database performance

    Performance gains are among the key highlights of the latest update of the open source PostgreSQL 12 database. PostgreSQL 12 became generally available Oct. 3, providing users of the widely deployed database with multiple enhanced capabilities including SQL JSON query support and improved authentication and administration options. The PostgreSQL 12 update will potentially affect a wide range of use cases in which the database is deployed, according to Noel Yuhanna, an analyst at Forrester Research. "Organizations are using PostgreSQL to support all kinds of workloads and use cases, which is pushing the needs for better performance, improved security, easier access to unstructured data and simplified deployments," Yuhanna said. "To address this, PostreSQL12 improves performance by improving its indexing that requires less space and has better optimization to deliver faster access."

  • Olimex Launches NB-IoT DevKit Based on Quectel BC66 Module for 19 Euros

    There are three LPWAN standards currently dominating the space LoRaWAN, NB-IoT, and Sigfox. 

  • Intel Denverton based Fanless Network Appliance Comes with 6x Ethernet Ports, 2x SFP Cages
  • Heading levels

    the headings would be “Apples” (level 1), “Taste” (level 2), “Sweet” (level 3), “Color” (level 2). Determining the level of any given heading requires traversing through its previous siblings and their descendants, its parent and the previous siblings and descendants of that, et cetera. That is too much complexity and optimizing it with caches is evidently not deemed worth it for such a simple feature. However, throwing out the entire feature and requiring everyone to use h1 through h6 forever, adjusting them accordingly based on the document they end up in, is not very appealing to me. So I’ve been trying to come up with an alternative algorithm that would allow folks to use h1 with sectioning elements exclusively while giving assistive technology the right information (default styling of h1 is already adjusted based on nesting depth). The simpler algorithm only looks at ancestors for a given heading and effectively only does so for h1 (unless you use hgroup). This leaves the above example in the weird state it is in in today’s browsers, except that the h1 (“Color”) would become level 2. It does so to minimally impact existing documents which would usually use h1 only as a top-level element or per the somewhat-erroneous recommendation of the HTML Standard use it everywhere, but in that case it would dramatically improve the outcome.

  • openSUSE OBS Can Now Build Windows WSL Images

    As Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is becoming a critical piece of Microsoft’s cloud and data-center audience, openSUSE is working on technologies that help developers use distributions of their choice for WSL. Users can run the same WSL distribution that they run in the cloud or on their servers. The core piece of openSUSE’s WSL offering is the WSL appx files, which are basically zip files that contain a tarball of a Linux system (like a container) and a Windows exe file, the so called launcher.

2D using Godot

This brings me to the GUI parts. I’m still not convinced that I understand how to properly layout stuff using Godot, but at least it looks ok now – at the cost of some fixed element sizes and such. I need to spend some more time to really understand how the anchoring and stretching really works. I guess I have a hard time wrapping my head around it as the approach is different from what I’m used to from Qt. Looking at the rest of the code, I’ve tried to make all the other scenes (in Godot, everything is a scene) like independent elements. For instance, the card scene has a face, and an is_flipped state. It can also signal when it is being flipped and clicked. Notice that the click results in a signal that goes to the table scene, which decides if the card needs to be flipped or not. The same goes for the GUI parts. They simple signal what was clicked and the table scene reacts. There are some variables too, e.g. the number of pairs setting in the main menu, and the points in the views where that is visible. Read more

Linux Graphics Stack: Intel, AMD and More

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adds Bits For Jasper Lake PCH

    Details are still light on Jasper Lake, but volleyed onto the public mailing list today was the initial support for the Jasper Lake PCH within the open-source Linux graphics driver side. The patch adds in the Jasper Lake PCH while acknowledging it's similar to Icelake and Tigerlake behavior. The Jasper Lake PCI device ID is 0x4D80. The patch doesn't reveal any other notable details but at least enough to note that the Jasper Lake support is on the way. Given the timing, the earliest we could see Intel Jasper Lake support out in the mainline kernel would be for Linux 5.5, which will be out as stable as the first kernel series of 2020 and in time for the likes of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Fedora 32.

  • Linux Graphics Drivers Could Have User-Space API Changes More Strictly Evaluated

    In response to both the AMD Radeon and Intel graphics drivers adding new user-space APIs for user-space code that just gets "[thrown] over the wall instead of being open source developed projects" and the increase of Android drivers introducing their own UAPI headaches, Airlie is looking at enforcing more review/oversight when DRM drivers want to make user-space API changes. The goal ultimately is to hopefully yield more cross-driver UAPI discussions and in turn avoiding duplicated efforts, ensuring good development implementations prior to upstreaming, and better quality with more developers reviewing said changes.

  • xf86-video-ati 19.1 Released With Crash & Hang Fixes

    For those making use of xf86-video-ati on X.Org-enabled Linux desktops, the version 19.1 release brings just a handful of new fixes. This release was announced today by Michel Dänzer who last month departed AMD to now work on Red Hat's graphics team. Michel is sticking around the Mesa/X.Org world for Red Hat's duties but is hoping someone else will be picking up maintenance of the xf86-video-ati/xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers going forward. Granted, not a lot of activity happens to these X.Org DDX drivers these days considering more Linux desktops slowly moving over to Wayland, many X11 desktops using the generic xf86-video-modesetting, and these AMD drivers being fairly basic now with all of the big changes in the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver.