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Games: A Year Of Rain, Evan's Remains, Dota Underlords, ISLANDERS, Nowhere Prophet, Fear The Rampager and More

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Gaming
  • Daedalic Entertainment's new RTS "A Year Of Rain" will be coming to Linux

    This is really exciting news, as a huge fan of such RTS games, Daedalic Entertainment's "A Year Of Rain" looks really good and it turns out they're going to support Linux.

    Interestingly, back when it was first announced in March I did email Daedalic to ask about Linux support. They told me then, that they didn't really have any answer on it. However, it seems things have changed and they've decided Linux will be supported. On Steam, the developer said it's planned and it seems it may even happen during the Early Access period.

  • Evan's Remains, a beautiful-looking puzzle platformer with visual novel elements plans Linux support

    Evan's Remains from Matías Schmied and Whitethorn Digital is a new one to capture my interest. Blending a rather atmospheric puzzle platformer, with a little visual novel flair and it's planned for Linux.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is now in open beta for Linux, mobile too

    Valve are doing some really impressive work with Dota Underlords, their new strategy game that everyone can now try.

    As a quick reminder on the gameplay: you go through rounds, picking heroes and placing them on the board, then you fight against the choices of other players and neutral enemies for loot. The actual battles are done by AI, with the tactical part based on your choices and positioning. You lose health based on the amount of enemy heroes left if they beat you and it's the last player standing to win.

    It's free and will remain free to play, with some sort of optional Battle Pass likely to come for cosmetic items in future. They have a lot more planned for it including: daily challenges, a level up system, a tournament system, seasonal rotation for heroes and more. They said that during the Open Beta Season, it will regularly see new features and updates.

  • Colourful city-builder 'ISLANDERS' has officially released for Linux and it's really lovely

    I don't think I've hit the buy button on Steam that quickly in a while, as ISLANDERS, a colourful city-builder is now officially out for Linux.

    Developed by GrizzlyGames, ISLANDERS is a minimalist strategy game for those who don't have hours to invest in resource management. Released back in April, the Linux version arrived yesterday along with a big update that also adds in a Sandbox Mode and the ability to undo your last building placement which sounds handy.

  • Roguelike deck-building game 'Nowhere Prophet' releasing on July 19th, looks very interesting

    Deck-building card-based games really are all the rage now! I'm okay with this, as I love them and I am excited to see what more developers do with it. Nowhere Prophet is one that looks great and it's out next month. Developer Sharkbomb Studios and publisher No More Robots have now confirmed the release date of July 19th. We got confirmation back in April, that Linux will be supported too.

    Set on planet Soma, this science-fiction post-apocalypse game mixes in two distinct modes of play. The first is the travel system, with you facing encounters across a procedurally generated map (so the game is different each time). If you enter combat, it switches into the turn-based card game mode.

  • Dead Cells "Fear The Rampager" update is live and it continues being awesome

    Still one of my top games, Dead Cells just got another big free update "Fear The Rampager" so it's time to jump back in for one more run.

    The big addition this time is the introduction of The Rampager. A new foe to challenge you that's currently haunting a variety of biomes in Boss Stem Cell 3 and higher.

  • Heroes of Hammerwatch updated and the Witch Hunter expansion is out now

    Crackshell have expanded their rogue-lite action-adventure game Heroes of Hammerwatch with a free update along with the great sounding Witch Hunter expansion.

    First up, the free update available for everyone adds in a few new features including new dungeon mechanics, companions, new drinks and a new statue if you have the Pyramid of Prophecy DLC. Additionally the free update has some performance improvements, more chest room variations, enemies can now be killed by poison and plenty of other balance changes.

  • My Friend Pedro | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    My Friend Pedro running through Steam play.

Games: QUICKTEQUILA, Valve, Counter-Strike, Mordhau and Snaps of Games

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Gaming
  • Lovely Planet 2: April Skies is an FPS with a sweet style for those who like to go fast

    Lovely Planet 2: April Skies from QUICKTEQUILA and tinyBuild has released, with Linux support just like the first game. Are you reading to run, jump and shoot? There's a lot of that.

  • Valve have given out some more details on the Index VR HMD with a "Deep Dive" about the Field of View

    As the first in a series of posts giving out more detail on what Valve wanted to achieve with the Valve Index, a new Deep Dive post is up starting with information about the Field of View. Future posts will also be covering Extensibility and Mod-ability as well as Optics and Clarity so we will keep an eye out for those and let you know when they're up.

    VR is something that's completely new to me, I've never owned one and the most I've ever tested is about 30 minutes of a Vive in a local GAME store and it was…weird. I want to be convinced, so perhaps the Valve Index will truly sway me over.

    As for the FOV post, Valve said their goal with the Index was to "improve the overall fidelity of the VR experience, including visuals, audio, ergonomics, tracking quality, and more". Interestingly, I wasn't actually aware until this post that you could tweak the HMD's lenses distance to your eyes which is pretty handy and that's on top of the slider on top of the unit to adjust the spacing between the lenses. It certainly seems like Valve have made some interesting design choices, to make it as comfortable as possible for many people.

  • Valve are doing a small celebration for 20 years of Counter-Strike

    Has it really been 20 years? Madness. Counter-Strike started off life as a Half-Life mod in 1999 and the series is still going strong. Pretty amazing really, to think something that started off as a modification in 1999 for another game by two people has later spawned four games: Counter-Strike (2000), Counter-Strike: Condition Zero (2004), Counter-Strike: Source (2004) and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (2012).

  • Mordhau | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Mordhau running through Steam play.

  • Fresh snaps for May 2019

    Got a potato gaming computer? You can still ‘game’ on #linux with Vitetris right in your terminal! Featuring configurable keys, high-score table, multi (2) player mode and joystick support! Get your Pentomino on today!

Games: Dead Mage, Slime Rancher and HyperRogue

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Gaming

Games: Seeds of Resilience, Missed Messages, GIGABUSTER, Eagle Island

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Gaming
  • Turn-based survival villager builder 'Seeds of Resilience' released

    Seeds of Resilience has an interesting idea about survival, with you trying not to die on a deserted island and the full release is now available. The full release comes with 12 missions to unlock characters and learn the game as well as a plain survival mode to go at your own pace and do as you wish.

  • Short free Visual Novel "Missed Messages" has beautiful artwork and a mature subject

    I rarely try Visual Novels, mostly because too many of them are overly lewd in some way. However, Missed Messages is of a different sort and it's quite beautiful.

    Developed by Angela He, it's completely free and surprisingly well done. The theme is quite a mature one too, with it touching on suicide and self-harm. It also touches on romance, there's a few memes (who doesn't love a good meme) and so on. What's striking initially is the artwork, it's seriously good. Great chilled-out soundtrack to go along with it too, the quality here really is impressive.

  • GIGABUSTER, an action platformer inspired by Mega Man Zero and Mega Man X will support Linux

    Available to help fund on Kickstarter, GIGABUSTER is an action platformer taking inspiration from Mega Man Zero and Mega Man X.

    They're very clear on release platforms too which is nice to see, with a mention of a Steam release for "Windows, Mac, and Linux". Interestingly, it's being made with Construct 2, a very interesting HTML5 game creator that I've tinkered with myself and found it to be pretty impressive. Thanks to that, you can try out the early W.I.P demo right in your browser on Game Jolt.

  • After a very impressive demo, Eagle Island is launching on July 11th

    Eagle Island, a game where you run around and throw your loyal owl companion at your enemies (yes really, it's awesome) is set to release on July 11th.

Games: Project Zero Deaths, Littlewood, Ravenfield, ENCODYA

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Gaming
  • Project Zero Deaths, a new free to play online platform shooter has Linux support

    A free game to start the day with, as the multiplayer platform shooter Project Zero Deaths recently entered Early Access and it includes Linux support.

  • The peaceful building RPG 'Littlewood' is now available in Early Access with Linux same-day support

    Littlewood from developer Sean Young arrived on Steam in Early Access today and it looks like a very promising and peaceful RPG. Funded thanks to the help of nearly four thousand people on Kickstarter, Littlewood is set after the world has been saved and you're the hero tasked with rebuilding a town.

  • Ravenfield, the fun single-player FPS now has a built-in map editor and destructible object support

    The amount of content being added into Ravenfield is quite impressive and now anyone can easily make their own maps for it, without the need of Unity.

    Early Access Build 16 went live recently, with a custom-made map editor that works on Linux and it's surprisingly easy to use. You no longer need the Ravenfield mod tools for Unity, making it far more accessible. It comes with all of the official Ravenfield props, meaning you can place down all sorts of things. When ready, it also has Steam Workshop support built in for you to publish it.

  • Science Fiction point-and-click Encodya has a demo released, will go to Kickstarter

    The background story of the upcoming science fiction point and click game Encodya is the Kickstarter campaign for the animation short movie Robot Will Protect You. Getting over 23.000€ from an initial target of 8.750€, it reached several stretch goals, the last one being "We'll start developing a game!". And so they did...

    The game, named "ENCODYA", grabbed my attention in a Facebook group about point and click adventures. Drawn by the art, I asked if a Linux version would be possible. Indeed it was, and I was asked if I could test it. As it's using Unity, I expected it to a) fail on trying to play a video, Cool show graphical problems or c) just run like the Windows version. First a) it was. But the author was eager to make the Linux version and a fix was attempted. After struggling with finding the right output options for the studio's intro video, we found that everything seems to be working just like on Windows. So Hooray for the game engines supporting the OS of our choice!

Games: Overcooked! 2, Stimulating Simulator Sale, PyGamer and Atari VCS

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Gaming
  • Overcooked! 2 - Night of the Hangry Horde extends one of the best co-op games even further

    Overcooked! 2, an absolutely brilliant game to play in co-op just recently got even bigger with the Night of the Hangry Horde DLC now available. You can either buy it directly or if you have the Season Pass, it's another that's included.

    Sounds like quite an amusing DLC, as it comes with a new Horde Mode which actually looks pretty good. More than just a silly name, it introduces some new game mechanics as you try to repel waves of undead ingredients across eight levels. On top of that there's twelve additional levels, nine new kitchens, and four new chefs to pick from.

  • The Stimulating Simulator Sale at the Humble Store is live, some good Linux games are in

    Here's a sale to start your week with! The Stimulating Simulator Sale is now live on the Humble Store until June 21st.

    As expected, there's a rather varied selection as what makes a "Simulator" seems to have a pretty broad definition and some are pushing it a bit.

  • PyGamer open source handheld gaming starter kit $59.95

    Expanding their PyGamer offerings, Adafruit has now made available the PyGamer Starter Kit priced at $59.95 providing everything you need to create your very own fully functional open source pocket handheld games console that can run CircuitPython, MakeCode Arcade or Arduino games you write yourself. Equipped with a 1.8″ 160×128 color TFT display with dimmable backlight, dual-potentiometer analog stick and buttons.

    On the rear of the device Adafruit have also thoughtfully included a full Feather-compatible header socket set, enabling those interested to plug-in any FeatherWing to expand the capabilities of the PyGamer. There are also 3 STEMMA connectors – two 3-pin with ADC/PWM capability and one 4-pin that connects to I2C which can also be used for Grove sensors. Checkout the PyGamer Starter Kit in the video below.

  • Atari VCS Linux-powered gaming console now available for pre-order for $249

    At the E3 Expo, the largest video game trade event in the world, which took place recently in Los Angeles, US, Atari made a big announcement concerning advances of the Atari VCS. For those new to Atari VCS, it is a home gaming and entertainment system.

    Gamers can enjoy Atari’s world of all-new and classic games, including Atari games, streaming multimedia and personal apps; or can easily make their own.

Games: Terminal, Donensbourgh, Voxel Tycoon, SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, Truck the System, RPCS3 and Thrive

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Gaming
  • 5 command-line games for sysadmins

    Just because you prefer working in a text-mode interface doesn't mean you're not entitled to a little fun here and there.

    Last December, I took some time out before the holidays to explore some of my favorite command-line diversions into a series for Opensource.com. It ended up being a bit of an advent calendar for terminal toys, and I got some great suggestions from readers.

    Now summer has arrived, at least for us in the northern hemisphere, and for many of this means a time of summer breaks, vacations, and generally trying to fit in a little relaxation between committing code and closing tickets. So to that end, I thought I'd revisit five of my favorite command-line games from that series, and share them here with you on Enable Sysadmin.

  • Donensbourgh, a medieval farming RPG that could be one to watch has Linux support

    Currently in the early stages but it seems promising, Donensbourgh is a medieval RPG with no violence or combat of any kind for those after perhaps a more relaxing experience. I'm glad developers take risks and make games like this, as I do enjoy games with plenty of combat but I often find there's not enough outside of that.

    Sadly, it seems they don't do their development videos showcasing gameplay in English so I've not a clue what they're saying.

  • An early build of the tycoon strategy game 'Voxel Tycoon' will release on itch.io later this month

    Voxel Tycoon, another in-development indie game that will have Linux support is arriving soon with an early build.

    What exactly is it? The developer says it's a "tycoon strategy game about transportation, building factories, and mining in a beautiful voxel landscapes" which sounds interesting. Even more interesting perhaps, is their claim that it will include "all-new features never before seen in the genre". I'm keen to see if it will live up to that in any way, so I will be taking a look when it's ready.

  • SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG

    SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, the fun card-based tactical RPG from Image and Form (developer) and Thunderful (publisher) can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG.

  • Truck the System, an upcoming game about building trucks and then racing them sounds amusing

    Currently in development by UK developer jorgen games (hooray, a fellow Brit!), Truck the System is a slightly unusual racing game that's coming to Linux.

    It's not a standard racing game like Dirt or Grid as you will be actually building your vehicle, possibly adding a bunch of weapons and then race or fight your way to the finish. Sounds like it could be a lot of fun! There's no full trailer yet since it's still in development but here's a few quick clips to give you an idea:

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 has a new report out, over 40% of listed games now "Playable"

    RPCS3, the very impressive PlayStation 3 emulator continues advancing quickly with the team putting up a new report. This latest report covers April, with the delay being due to not having enough contributors. They're actually looking for help writing them, which you can apply for here.

  • Thrive, a free and open source game about the evolution of life

    Thrive [Official Site] is a game I came across years ago, a game about the evolution of life with you starting as a tiny Microbe and eventually working up to something more complex.

    That idea might sound familiar and for good reason, as it was originally inspired by the game Spore. However, they're attempting to go a little further by being scientifically accurate and have the evolution play-out across both you and everything around you.

Games: Strange Loop Games and City Builder

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Gaming

Games: NetherWorld, Dota Underlords and DXVK

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Gaming
  • NetherWorld, an impressive looking and weird narrative pixel-art action game is coming to Linux

    Currently in development by Hungry Pixel, NetherWorld has a pretty impressive pixel-art visual style that will mix insane action with narrative elements and it's coming to Linux.

    The actual plot of the game sounds pretty wild, starting with a marriage crisis as your wife decides to leave you and so you head to the local Bar to drown your sorrows. One thing leads to another with some unexpected turns, as you go on some sort of twisted journey as you explore the darkest corners of the land of NetherWorld.

    Discovered thanks to IndieDB, the developer recently confirmed to me that it will be supporting Linux.

  • Dota Underlords from Valve is already quite addictive and they're improving it quickly

    With Dota Underlords available for testing, I've now taken a look at it (thanks Scaine!) and so far I've been quite impressed.

    Valve have essentially rewritten the rules of "Valve Time", considering how quickly they've made it available and how promptly they've been responding to feedback. They've already adjusted it so you can switch between a Mobile and PC style for the user interface, fixed up the Linux version nicely (it runs beautifully!), removed the odd character outlines from the PC version and so on. Honestly, I'm genuinely surprised at how fast Valve are reacting with it.

    Since this is apparently the next big thing, it's nice to see that Linux gamers can jump on in right away thanks to Valve. As a reminder, the original creator of the mod is making a stand-alone version for the Epic Games Store and the League of Legends developer Riot are also doing their own.

  • DXVK 1.2.2 released with performance improvements and bug fixes

    DXVK, the incredible project that provides a Vulkan-based layer for D3D11 and D3D10 games run with Wine has another release now available. DXVK 1.2.2 is quite a small point release but as always, it still brings with it some nice changes.

    This time around Team Sonic Racing has a bug fix to help some startup issues and Planet Coaster should also see less startup issues, although Planet Coaster does need "additional wine patches" as of Wine 4.10.

    Also in this release are some CPU overhead optimizations, improved compute shader performance on Nvidia GPUs in some games with Nier: Automata being one that was noted and minor bugs were solved that caused wine test failures.

Games: GOG Summer Sale Festival, The Expression Amrilato, Atari VCS

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Gaming
  • GOG are giving away Toonstruck during the Summer Sale Festival finale

    The GOG Summer Sale Festival is ending on Monday June 17th at 10 PM UTC, so GOG are now giving away copies of Toonstruck.

  • The Expression Amrilato, a Yuri Visual Novel that teaches some Esperanto has a same-day Linux release on GOG

    Currently stuck in release limbo on Steam, 'The Expression Amrilato' has been released on GOG today with full Linux support. Curiously, this Yuri Visual Novel will also teach you some of the Esperanto language.

    I will fully admit to being completely uncultured here, I had to google around about Esperanto for a while. I had never heard of it until I saw this game. If you didn't know either, Esperanto is an international auxiliary language, something meant to help people communicate when they don't share a common language. Well, that's what my Googling told me anyway…

  • Here’s how Atari VCS will run PC games

    Back when Atari was first describing the VCS, it tried to position it as a jack-of-all-trades console that would play retro Atari games on top of being a media player on top of also playing some PC games. Today we’re getting a better idea of how it’s going to do all of that, and a lot of its capability lies in its Sandbox Mode.

    When you boot up the VCS, Atari says that you’ll be greeted by a “color-splashed modern dashboard,” which is where you’ll access things like your apps and the Atari Store. It’s there you’ll also find a bold window in the center, which you can select to reboot the console into Sandbox Mode. With Sandbox mode, you’ll be able to run your choice of a number of operating systems via USB boot drive (Atari mentions Windows, Ubuntu, and Chrome OS specifically), allowing you to run PC games on the machine.

    With an AMD Ryzen processor and Radeon graphics at the core, along with either 4 or 8GB of RAM depending on the model you buy, it sounds like the Atari VCS will be similar in power to an entry-level gaming PC (a notion that it’s $280 price tag supports). The console supports USB and Bluetooth keyboards, mice, controllers, and “most other PC peripherals,” so you’ll don’t necessarily have to settle for playing PC titles with a gamepad if you don’t want to.

  • Can Fortnite Run on Linux?

    Can Fortnite run on Linux? It sure can!

    Valve has been trying to improve the appeal and usability of PC gaming on Linux and making big games available on the platform is one of those steps.

    It involves some tinkering to play some of the games, including Fortnite. Here's how to do it.

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More in Tux Machines

AMD Releases Firmware Update To Address SEV Vulnerability

A new security vulnerability has been made public over AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) having insecure cryptographic implementations. Fortunately, this AMD SEV issue is addressed by a firmware update. CVE-2019-9836 has been made pulic as the AMD Secure Processor / Secure Encrypted Virtualization having an insecure cryptographic implementation. Read more

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to get the latest Wine on Linux Mint 19
  • How to Install KDE Plasma in Arch Linux (Guide)
  • 0 bytes left

    Around 2003–2004, a friend and I wrote a softsynth that was used in a 64 kB intro. Now, 14 years later, cTrix and Pselodux picked it up and made a really cool 32 kB tune with it! Who would have thought.

  • A month full of learning with Gnome-GSoC

    In this month I was able to work with Libgit2-glib where Albfan mentored me on how to port functions from Libgit2 to Libgit2-glib. Libgit2-glib now has functionality to compare two-buffers. This feature I think can now benefit other projects also which requires diff from buffers, for example Builder for it’s diff-view and gedit.

  • Google Developers Are Looking At Creating A New libc For LLVM

    As part of Google's consolidating their different toolchains around LLVM, they are exploring the possibility of writing a new C library "libc" implementation.  Google is looking to develop a new C standard library within LLVM that will better suit their use-cases and likely others within the community too. 

  • How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

    We’ve witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda’s speed, and we’ve experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we’ve been able to dedicate a lot of time recently to optimizing Conda.  We’d like to take this opportunity to discuss what we did, and what we think is left to do.

  • TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

    By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we’ll call it “DL” for short). This popular framework has been increasingly used to solve a variety of complex research, business and social problems. Since 2016, Intel and Google have worked together to optimize TensorFlow for DL training and inference speed performance on CPUs. The Anaconda Distribution has included this CPU-optimized TensorFlow as the default for the past several TensorFlow releases. Performance optimizations for CPUs are provided by both software-layer graph optimizations and hardware-specific code paths. In particular, the software-layer graph optimizations use the Intel Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (Intel MKL-DNN), an open source performance library for DL applications on Intel architecture. Hardware specific code paths are further accelerated with advanced x86 processor instruction set, specifically, Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512) and new instructions found in the Intel Deep Learning Boost (Intel DL Boost) feature on 2nd generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Let’s take a closer look at both optimization approaches and how to get these accelerations from Anaconda.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

VIdeo/Audio: Linux in the Ham Shack, How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and "Debian Package of the Day"

  • LHS Episode #290: Where the Wild Things Are

    Welcome to Episode 290 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short format show, the hosts discuss the recent ARRL Field Day, LIDs getting theirs, vandalism in Oregon, a Canonical flip-flop, satellite reception with SDR and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0

    In this video, I am going to show how to Install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • Jonathan Carter: PeerTube and LBRY

    I have many problems with YouTube, who doesn’t these days, right? I’m not going to go into all the nitty gritty of it in this post, but here’s a video from a LBRY advocate that does a good job of summarizing some of the issues by using clips from YouTube creators: I have a channel on YouTube for which I have lots of plans for. I started making videos last year and created 59 episodes for Debian Package of the Day. I’m proud that I got so far because I tend to lose interest in things after I figure out how it works or how to do it. I suppose some people have assumed that my video channel is dead because I haven’t uploaded recently, but I’ve just been really busy and in recent weeks, also a bit tired as a result. Things should pick up again soon.

Games: Steam Summer Sale, Last Moon, Ubuntu-Valve-Canonical Faceoff

  • Steam Summer Sale 2019 is live, here’s what to look out for Linux fans

    Another year, another massive sale is now live on Steam. Let’s take a look at what Valve are doing this year and what you should be looking out for. This time around, Valve aren’t doing any special trading cards. They’re trying something a little different! You will be entering the "Steam Grand Prix" by joining a team (go team Hare!), earning points for rewards and having a shot at winning some free games in the process. Sounds like a good bit of fun, the specific-game challenges are a nice touch.

  • Last Moon, a 2D action-RPG with a gorgeous vibrant style will be coming to Linux next year

    Sköll Studio managed to capture my attention recently, with some early footage of their action-RPG 'Last Moon' popping up in my feed and it looks gorgeous. Taking inspiration from classics like Legend of Zelda: A link to the past, Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger and a ton more you can see it quite clearly. Last Moon takes in place in a once peaceful kingdom, where an ancient and powerful mage put a curse on the moon, as Lunar Knight you need to stop all this insanity and bring back peace.

  • Ubuntu Takes A U-Turn with 32-Bit Support

    Canonical will continue to support legacy applications and libraries. Canonical, the maker of the world’s most popular Linux-based distribution Ubuntu, has revived support for 32-bit libraries after feedback from WINE, Ubuntu Studio and Steam communities. Last week Canonical announced that its engineering teams decided that Ubuntu should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture. “Consequently, i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure,” wrote Will Cooke, Director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

  • Steam and Ubuntu clash over 32-bit libs

    It has been a tumultuous week for gaming on Linux. Last Tuesday afternoon, Canonical's Steve Langasek announced that 32-bit libs would be frozen (kept as-is, with no new builds or updates) as of this October's interim 19.10 release, codenamed "Eoan Ermine." Langasek was pretty clear that this did not mean abandoning support for running 32-bit applications, however.

  • Linux gamers take note: Steam won’t support the next version of Ubuntu

    Valve has announced that from the next version of Ubuntu (19.10), it will no longer support Steam on Ubuntu, the most popular flavor of Linux, due to the distro dropping support for 32-bit packages, This all kicked off when Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, announced that it was seemingly completely dropping support for 32-bit in Ubuntu 19.10. However, following a major outcry, a further clarification (or indeed, change of heart) came from the firm stating that there will actually be limited support for 32-bit going forward (although updates for 32-bit libraries will no longer be delivered, effectively leaving them in a frozen state).

  • Valve killing Steam Support for some Ubuntu users

    A few years ago the announcement that Steam would begin supporting Linux was a big deal: it meant that anyone who preferred to rock an open-source operating system over Mac OS or Windows 10 would have instant buy-it-and-play-it access to a large catalog of game titles that would have otherwise taken a whole lot of tweaking to get up and running or wouldn't have worked for them at all. For some, at least, the party may be coming to an end.

  • Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu, but not Linux entirely

    The availability of Steam on Linux has been a boom for gaming on the platform, especially with the recent addition of the Steam Play compatibility layer for running Windows-only games. Valve has always recommended that gamers run Ubuntu Linux, the most popular desktop Linux distribution, but that's now changing.

  • Canonical (sort of) backtracks: Ubuntu will continue to support (some) 32-bit software

    A few days after announcing it would effectively drop support for 32-bit software in future versions of the Ubuntu operating system, Canonical has decided to “change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages.” The company’s original decision sparked some backlash when it became clear that some existing apps and games would no longer run on Ubuntu 19.10 if the change were to proceed as planned. Valve, for example, announced it would continue to support older versions of Ubuntu, allowing users to continue running its popular Steam game client. But moving forward, the company said it would be focusing its Steam for Linux efforts on a different GNU/Linux distribution.

  • Just kidding? Ubuntu 32-bit moving forward, no word yet from Valve

    Due in part to the feedback given to the group over the weekend and because of their connections with Valve, Canonical did an about-face today. They’ve suggested that feedback from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community led them to change their plan and will “build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. Whether this will change Valve’s future with Ubuntu Steam, we’ll see.

  • Canonical backtracks on 32-bit Ubuntu cull, but warns that on your head be it

    CANONICAL HAS CONFIRMED a U-Turn on the controversial decision to drop 32-bit support for Ubuntu users later this year. The company has faced criticism from users who aren't happy with the plan to make Ubuntu purely 64-bit, which culminated at the weekend with Steam announcing it would pull support for Ubuntu. Many Steam games were never made in 64-bit and it would, therefore, devalue the offer. However, Canonical confirmed on Monday that following feedback from the community, it was clear that there is still a demand, and indeed a need for 32-bit binaries, and as such, it will provide "selected" builds for both Ubuntu 19.10 and the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04. Canonical's announcement spoke of the highly passionate arguments from those who are in favour of maintaining both versions, thus forcing the team to take notice. However, it has made it clear that it's doing so under the weight of expectation, not because it agrees. "There is a real risk to anybody who is running a body of software that gets little testing. The facts are that most 32-bit x86 packages are hardly used at all," the firm said.